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Schwalbe S-One

SRC1SRC1 Posts: 301
edited January 2016 in Road general
I've just bought a pair of 30mm Schwalbe S-Ones to fit to my Kinesis GF-Ti for this year's trip to France to ride PR cobbles. I've just managed to get them onto a pair of Pacenti SL23 rims and I'm not sure I've the confidence to use them.

They were so tight I nearly gave up on the whole idea, but having learnt a few new tricks they are actually mounted and on a positive note, they pumped up very easily with no loss of sealant.

However, I've only got one layer of Stans yellow rim tape, so there's a slight worry that one layer won't cope with the pressure I'm running at (50psi). Also, if I do have an pun****e the sealant doesn't fix, I really don't fancy getting a tube in by the side of the road.

One option, is I take a spare tyre and tube with me, but that seems a bit silly...

Thoughts?

Posts

  • ddraverddraver Posts: 21,170
    I think you re overthinking this...
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,550
    Those rims are tough to get any tyre onto in my experience - needed to warm up some Rubino Pros in order to get them to fit.
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • SRC1SRC1 Posts: 301
    ddraver wrote:
    I think you re overthinking this...

    You'd use the tubeless tyre? Would you bother taking a spare tube?
  • svettysvetty Posts: 1,904
    Used to take me ages to get tyres on these rims but this forced me to optimise my fitting technique and now I can do it without too much trouble - so worth it in the end. To answer your question, make sure the sealant is fresh and use enough. You'd be unlucky to get a puncture the sealant won't seal but it is worth taking a tube just in case
    FFS! Harden up and grow a pair :D
  • DKayDKay Posts: 1,652
    The older spec SL23's are notoriously difficult to get tyres mounted onto, hence why they've been revised to have a slightly smaller diameter. Once fitted though, the bead of the tyre will stretch enough to make taking the tyre off again much easier.
  • Get yourself one of these http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/velo ... lsrc=aw.ds

    Two things really one if you have put some miles in to the tyre is will be a bit softer and easier. I managed to get tube in just in to a 23mm on Fulcrum Zero. When I repaired the tyre at home it struck me to be a lot easier than the tube was.

    I have patched one now at the roadside well enough to get me home took less than 20 minutes didn't take it off just enough to clean the area, rough it up glue and patch.

    My experience is that when they go and the sealant cannot cope the hole is big enough to still find when deflated so fairly easy to patch.
  • SRC1SRC1 Posts: 301
    Thanks. I was really thinking (worrying) about what to do when out on the road, miles from home.

    I guess it's just because I'm new to tubeless and don't trust them yet, but my worry is getting a puncture the sealant doesn't fix and then not being able to get an inner tube in because they're so tight.

    I suspect if I had to get an inner-tube in, I probably would and I might even do it without pinching the tube too.

    BTW - I rode the S-Ones today for the first time. Running them at 50psi make for a very comfy ride yet they also felt really fast and made a lovely sound as I got up to speed. They're very nice tyres to ride on and I think I'll use them on my trip to French cobbles. I'll report back how I got on.
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,550

    I love the things that CRC think I should consider buying along with this kit:
    - A Park Professional toolkit
    - One or other of two wheel truing stands
    - A torque wrench

    Getting the tyre off might be harder than I think
    :D
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
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