Forum home Mountain biking forum MTB buying advice

Shoes for flat pedals and gym?

rumbatazrumbataz Posts: 796
edited December 2015 in MTB buying advice
My very aged Asics trainers are nearing the end of their useful life. They've lasted so many years that I can't even remember when I bought them! They've survived years of gym training, walking, running and cycling.

They are very heavy and rugged trainers so I'm looking for a new pair of trainers that can perform three functions:

1. Gym circuit training;

2. Walking;

3. Cycling (flat pedals).

Ideally the pair need to weigh in at under 500g - my old Asics are 752g for the pair and I can definitely feel the weight!

I already have a dedicated pair of running shoes so the new trainers won't be used for running. They just need to be able to cope with all-weather cycling, the gym and walking.

I looked at Five Ten Freeriders but they weigh a ton! The current forerunners are Nike Free 5.0 trainers that have a flat sole, are reasonably light and tick all the boxes and can be worn as casual shoes too.

Posts

  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Cycling shoes need stiff soles. Nike Free are probably the worst choice.

    Buy some proper riding shoes and some gym shoes.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • I own Nike Free of various kinds, and use them as my daily shoes. In fact, I am wearing them now. They are my favorite running shows by far.

    I ride with FreeRide Elements on Wellgo MG-5 pedals.

    I tried the pedals with my various other shoes, and aside from the FreeRide, the Nike were the best due to the flat soles, less heel to forefoot drop, less cushioning, and how they gripped the studs.

    Yes, the Nike Free is designed to be flexible, which in theory is the opposite of what you want. That being said, they are fine. You can almost feel the studs, but not in a bad way. What matters more is the flat bottom and how it provides a uniform surface for the pedal studs.

    I think you may be quite happy with the Nike Free for flat pedals. I often take the insoles out to have less height off the ground.
  • rumbatazrumbataz Posts: 796
    Thanks for the advice. I'm trying to settle on one shoe that is good enough to tick all the boxes. How is the sizing on the Nike Free shoes?

    In terms of cycling I'm just a leisure cyclist so am not too bothered about speed or long distances at the moment.
  • Historically I am a size 8.5 US but it is slowly dawning on me that I am really a 9. But in Nike Free I have to take the insoles out unless I get 9.5. So I would go up 1/2 a size and try them on in a store. They are an amazing running show.

    You may want the 3.0 as they are more flat than the 5.0 but harder to find (online or running store only).
  • rumbatazrumbataz Posts: 796
    Historically I am a size 8.5 US but it is slowly dawning on me that I am really a 9. But in Nike Free I have to take the insoles out unless I get 9.5. So I would go up 1/2 a size and try them on in a store. They are an amazing running show.

    You may want the 3.0 as they are more flat than the 5.0 but harder to find (online or running store only).

    Okay, I'll go for a size 7 then - I have small but wide feet: what is the width like?

    As for running shoes, I have a pair of Reebok Ultra Boost shoes and these are exclusively for running - they are amazing. If you ever want another pair of specific running shoes then take a look at the Reebok Ultra Boost shoes.

    I would actually buy the Nike Free 5.0 for walking, gym circuits and cycling using flat pedals.
  • I find the width to be typical. Not narrow or wide. They offer some in wide:

    http://help-en-us.nike.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/53369/~/nike-wide-shoes-and-narrow-shoes

    The Ultraboost and Nike Free are different philosophies in that the Adidas are 10mm difference between the heel and forefoot, whereas the Free is closer to a flat running shoe (it is a long story, but it is for people who sort of want to do the "barefoot" running, but not really all out).

    Nike Free 3.0 Flyknit is 4mm.

    Nike Free 4.0 Flyknit is 6mm.

    Nike Free 5.0 is 8mm.

    So if you think you prefer a taller heel, then get the 5.0. But you want closer to flat, then get the 3.0.

    You may find the 3.0 to be too extreme and prefer the 5.0. The 3.0 may give you sore calves for a while until those muscles adapt.
  • rumbatazrumbataz Posts: 796
    I eventually bought a pair of Reebok Crossfit Nano 5.0 trainers. I got a 30% discount on Black Friday directly from Reebok and customised them too. A lovely flat sole that's stiffer than the Nike one - works great on Wellgo MG1 pedals to the extent that I have to lift my foot off the pedals to reposition it.

    The trainers serve as excellent walking shoes and gym shoes too.
Sign In or Register to comment.