Cassette tool for shimano freehub

fixiebob
fixiebob Posts: 222
edited November 2015 in Workshop
Hi

I'm trying to change the cassette on a friends old 8 speed shimano screw on cassette, the tool I use for my own 9 and 10 speed cassettes seems ever so slightly too big.
Can someone tell me the right tool to buy please so I don't go and buy wrong one.

Thanks in advance

Rob

Comments

  • keezx
    keezx Posts: 1,322
    Depend completely on which model freewheel it is.
    Take the wheel to an old bike shop and maybe somebody gets an idea.
    https://www.google.nl/search?q=shimano+freewheel+tool&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0CD8QsARqFQoTCOaC1YLzkskCFcJYLAodR-sIZQ&biw=1280&bih=839
  • dj58
    dj58 Posts: 2,221
    If you mean a screw on freewheel, the Shimano tool is
    TL-FW30 Multiple Freewheel Removal Tool, code no. Y-120 09050

    If you mean a slide on cassette, the Shimano tool is
    TL-LR15 Lockring Removal Tool, code no. Y-120 09230

    Tools are listed here http://si.shimano.com/#seriesList/47
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Sounds like what you have is a screw on freewheel, not a cassette.

    So you likely need a freewheel tool. They look virtually the same as your Shimano cassette lockring tool, but crucially they are slightly thinner. I bought mine from Halfords.

    When you get one, clamp the tool in a bench vice or a Workmate, engage the freewheel with the splines of the tool, and unscrew the wheel anticlockwise. Easier still if the tyre's still on the wheel and fully inflated.

    A screw-on freewheel that's been on there a while can require a lot of grunt to shift, and a tool in an adjustable wrench just doesn't give you enough leverage.
  • fixiebob
    fixiebob Posts: 222
    Sounds like what you have is a screw on freewheel, not a cassette.

    So you likely need a freewheel tool. They look virtually the same as your Shimano cassette lockring tool, but crucially they are slightly thinner. I bought mine from Halfords.

    When you get one, clamp the tool in a bench vice or a Workmate, engage the freewheel with the splines of the tool, and unscrew the wheel anticlockwise. Easier still if the tyre's still on the wheel and fully inflated.

    A screw-on freewheel that's been on there a while can require a lot of grunt to shift, and a tool in an adjustable wrench just doesn't give you enough leverage.

    Thanks all it is a screw on freewheel tool on its way from cyclesurgery