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Special tyres for rollers?

crescentcrescent Posts: 1,102
edited November 2015 in Road general
Is it necessary to use special tyres on rollers? I know turbos require a different type of rear tyre due to the extra wear on it but I normally just plonk one of my bikes on the rollers and go for it, under the assumption that they are not being exposed to any more wear and tear than they would see on the road. However, after a roller session yesterday I thought my Gatorskins looked a bit "shiny", not sure if it is wear or just the effect of running on the relatively clean roller drums that have cleaned them up a bit.
Ribble Gran Fondo
Bianchi Impulso
BMC Teammachine

“When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race. “ ~H.G. Wells
Edit - "Unless it's a BMX"

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  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
      You don't need a special turbo tyre. They are just made of a harder wearing compound.

      Any old tyre past its best will do just as well. I wouldn't use a tyre you intend going outside on as they do square off on the sides.

      As for rollers you're simulating being on he road and there is no extra pressure on the tyre so you could use your normal setup without damaging them
    • redvisionredvision Posts: 2,812
      You can use any tyres - because the tyre moves freely on the roller it is no different to riding outside really.

      I found gatorskins to be a bit slippy on the rollers, and if using brand new gatorskins then you can get a black residue on the rear rollers which can be a b***** to get off.
    • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
      I found gatorskins to be a bit slippy on the rollers

      I have never used Gatorskins (preferring GP4000's and 4 Seasons) but have always perceived them to have poor grip.
      If they are 'slippy' on rollers, then surely they are slippy on the road?
    • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
      I used Schwalbe one and Ultremo which are a bit more grippy than contis.
    • redvisionredvision Posts: 2,812
      I found gatorskins to be a bit slippy on the rollers

      If they are 'slippy' on rollers, then surely they are slippy on the road?

      Only when new. The first time i bought Gatorskins several club mates, and also the lbs i bought them from, warned me that if the first ride on them is in the wet be very very cautious as they are notoriously slippery.
      This is only for the first ride or two though, after which they are excellent. They are no where near as grippy as GP4000s (which i use on my best bike) but then they last quite a bit longer.
    • Your tyres looking 'shiny' after being on the rollers is normal, mine do the same (mine are metal drums, not sure if plastic drum rollers are the same). It's nothing the worry about, a few miles and the road and they won't be shiny any more, and, I've never had issues with grip on the road while they are still shiny. One of the advantages of rollers over a turbo is that you don't have to mess around with swapping tyres/wheels or worrying about wearing out your best tyres.
    • crescentcrescent Posts: 1,102
      Hmmm, I do have some concerns over the Gatorskins' grip, especially in the wet. I fell off my bike for the first time in many, many years last week. It was slightly damp and the road was a bit muddy as it was near a farm and the bike just slid away from under me as I went round a corner - at low speed, as I was just pulling away from a junction - I wasn't hurt, but I still made a right a**e of myself. I have also noticed a bit of wheel spin in the wet when in low gears. The tyres are less than a year old and have not been used since my winter bike was put away back in March, and I don't recall them having much of a tread pattern on them to start with but they do look a wee bit smooth for my liking. Possibly just a bit of reaction from the spill.
      Thanks for the replies.
      Ribble Gran Fondo
      Bianchi Impulso
      BMC Teammachine

      “When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race. “ ~H.G. Wells
      Edit - "Unless it's a BMX"
    • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
      I found gatorskins to be a bit slippy on the rollers

      If they are 'slippy' on rollers, then surely they are slippy on the road?

      Only when new. The first time i bought Gatorskins several club mates, and also the lbs i bought them from, warned me that if the first ride on them is in the wet be very very cautious as they are notoriously slippery.
      This is only for the first ride or two though, after which they are excellent. They are no where near as grippy as GP4000s (which i use on my best bike) but then they last quite a bit longer.

      Sorry but I just don't buy that they 'wear in' from being dangerous ("very very cautious" "Notoriously slippery") to excellent.

      They sound like a commuting tyre at best, and even then I would just get something that gave me and the bike a better contact point with the tarmac.
    • redvisionredvision Posts: 2,812
      Carbonator wrote:

      Sorry but I just don't buy that they 'wear in' from being dangerous ("very very cautious" "Notoriously slippery") to excellent.

      They sound like a commuting tyre at best, and even then I would just get something that gave me and the bike a better contact point with the tarmac.

      I know it sounds strange but they do wear in. Its as if they are coated with something when they leave the factory. I was very unsure about them after the first ride, but a couple of rides later and i was won over. They aren't as fast as GP4000 but offer a lot of puncture resistance and don't cut up as easily.

      It is just a case of getting the first 20miles or so completed on a dry ride.
    • rumbatazrumbataz Posts: 796
      I've been using the same set of Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres on my hybrid with my Elite Arion Parabolic Rollers for almost two years now. No issues whatsoever and great grip.
    • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
      Carbonator wrote:

      Sorry but I just don't buy that they 'wear in' from being dangerous ("very very cautious" "Notoriously slippery") to excellent.

      They sound like a commuting tyre at best, and even then I would just get something that gave me and the bike a better contact point with the tarmac.

      I know it sounds strange but they do wear in. Its as if they are coated with something when they leave the factory. I was very unsure about them after the first ride, but a couple of rides later and i was won over. They aren't as fast as GP4000 but offer a lot of puncture resistance and don't cut up as easily.

      It is just a case of getting the first 20miles or so completed on a dry ride.

      I know this is hardly the same sport, but if you have ever watched F1 coverage where they refer to tyres as being "scrubbed"? They have removed the top layer of rubber to get to the grippier compound underneath. The same happens on all tyres. If you use a new tyre on a roller you won't scrub away the top layer and it will remain shiny. Add to that a smooth surface of a roller will polish the tyre as opposed to the road which is obviously rough and scrubs it proving better grip.

      If you look at the indoor trainer tyres, they are smooth but a very spongy rubber to provide grip against the resistance roller which is made of metal. If you use a normal tyre they tend to squeak on higher resistances as they just don't have the grip on them for that particular surface.
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