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Fat bloke and out of seat riding.

MiniMaltsMiniMalts Posts: 266
edited October 2015 in Road beginners
21 stone, 36 spoke wheels on a Ridgeback Speed (hybrid). If I get out of the saddle to ride uphill am I likely to snap spokes? Would it be advisable of someone my weight to just stay in the saddle and take it easy?

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  • 21 stone, 36 spoke wheels on a Ridgeback Speed (hybrid). If I get out of the saddle to ride uphill am I likely to snap spokes? Would it be advisable of someone my weight to just stay in the saddle and take it easy?
    The load on the wheels doesn't change much whether you're standing or sitting.

    Snapping a chain is more likely if you're very heavy and you give it some serious wellie standing up.

    Funniest thing I ever saw was a guy overtaking me on Broomfield Hill in Richmond Park. He got out of the saddle to come past me, and with less than a bike length gap ahead of me, his chain snapped, and there was this frantic 200rpm cadence for about two seconds, while he toppled over sideways in slomo.

    I had the chain splitter, he didn't - we had a good laugh over the next few minutes.
    Is the gorilla tired yet?
  • Recently I've been trying to stay seated more on climbs and spinning an easier gear. For any rider there is only so much time you can stand on the pedals.

    As the previous post I've only every seen a chain snap on a hill, wheels tend to be robust.
  • MiniMaltsMiniMalts Posts: 266
    When I first started cycling I couldn't stand up on the hills, but now I can. I'm trying to lose some of the fat on my thighs and build some muscle up so I mix of easy gear seated and then higher gear unseated. As long as it's the chain that snaps and I don't turn a wheel in to mincemeat then I'm happy.

    This post here is what made me ask. For the life of me I can't find out the max weight my bike is designed for. :/

    http://forum.ctc.org.uk/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=100765
  • As long as it's the chain that snaps and I don't turn a wheel in to mincemeat then I'm happy.
    It definitely won't be the wheel that turns to mincemeat if you're standing up when the chain snaps :)
    Is the gorilla tired yet?
  • Would it be advisable of someone my weight to just stay in the saddle and take it easy?

    No!

    It would be advisable to include high-intensity work in your exercise*, and then just fix the chain if it snaps!

    I know you didn't come on here asking for weight-loss advice but working at high intensity burns far more calories than pootling around for mile after mile.

    *doctor permitting, of course


    And sorry, but
    I'm trying to lose some of the fat on my thighs

    This isn't how it works. You cannot control the location of the fat cells your body uses. But eat a high-protein diet, avoid refined carbs, run a calorie deficit, do regular QUALITY exercise that works your largest muscle groups to failure, and you will lose fat from everywhere on your body.
  • MiniMaltsMiniMalts Posts: 266
    As long as it's the chain that snaps and I don't turn a wheel in to mincemeat then I'm happy.
    It definitely won't be the wheel that turns to mincemeat if you're standing up when the chain snaps :)

    Poorly worded post on my part. What I actually meant was, I'd rather snap chains from standing up than popping spokes. :)
  • MiniMaltsMiniMalts Posts: 266
    Would it be advisable of someone my weight to just stay in the saddle and take it easy?

    No!

    It would be advisable to include high-intensity work in your exercise*, and then just fix the chain if it snaps!

    I know you didn't come on here asking for weight-loss advice but working at high intensity burns far more calories than pootling around for mile after mile.

    *doctor permitting, of course


    And sorry, but
    I'm trying to lose some of the fat on my thighs

    This isn't how it works. You cannot control the location of the fat cells your body uses. But eat a high-protein diet, avoid refined carbs, run a calorie deficit, do regular QUALITY exercise that works your largest muscle groups to failure, and you will lose fat from everywhere on your body.


    I know, that's why I want to stand up and work those legs! :)

    Yes, but fat turns to muscle and as it's the legs that's getting the workout....

  • Yes, but fat turns to muscle and as it's the legs that's getting the workout....
    Fat does not turn to muscle.

    Fat is burned as fuel, and is converted to carbon dioxide and water. Muscle is mostly protein, synthesised from amino acids, which originate from dietary protein.

    The two metabolic pathways are completely separate. You have absolutely no control over where you lose fat from.
    Is the gorilla tired yet?
  • but fat turns to muscle and as it's the legs that's getting the workout....

    No.

    Just no.

    If you're serious about weight loss then it might be worth your while doing some reading. Myfitnesspal and the Livestrong fitness site are great places to start.
  • MiniMaltsMiniMalts Posts: 266
    Again, poorly worded post, by working out I burn fat, and at the same time gain muscle. I know I have no control over where I burn the fat, but I will be gaining muscle in the thighs. So in a way, I'm losing one, and gaining the other which is why I said turning fat to muscle. Whilst not correct, I know what I meant. :D

    I've lost over 6 stone since the start of the year by eating healthy, giving up the fizzy drinks, alcohol, chocolate and walking everywhere. It's only since August that I've started cycling to help lose weight as my feet were screaming no more walking (I really was chewing them up quite badly). :(
  • That's a lot of weight lost, man. Congratulations!
  • That's a lot of weight lost, man. Congratulations!
    ^^ This.
    Is the gorilla tired yet?
  • MiniMaltsMiniMalts Posts: 266
    Thanks guys. :)
  • fatdazfatdaz Posts: 348
    I second MyFitnessPal. Providing you are brutally honest with yourself about what you are eating and what exercise you are doing it is a fantastic, simple (and free) way to keep your weight loss on track long term. I lost 4 stone (nearly a quarter of my body weight) using MyFitnessPal to monitor what I ate and cycling (and later running after some weight came off). I've now kept the weight off for 2 years, ridden in the Pyrenees and the Alps, run a marathon and just completed my first half ironman triathlon. It all started with the desire to change and a weight loss goal input into MyFitnessPal
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