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Newbie to Winter Commuting Wear - Layers- Jackets vs Jerseys

wolfsbane2kwolfsbane2k Posts: 2,965
edited October 2015 in Road beginners
Hi.
I'm currently planning my winter commuting routine of 10miles each way (~30 mins) , and I'm trying to find the appropriate way to keep warm & dry for a budget without overheating - I've got rid of the car now, so have no choice!
I'm trying to work out the right mix of layers, and can't seem to get it right at the moment, but it's not that cold yet at 6 degrees C when I leave in the morning.

I've just started wearing a L/S polaris baselayer and a S/S top , and within 2 minutes I'm warm enough, but if it's windy I freeze.
If I change the S/S top to a L/S Jersey, I overheat, again unless it's windy, then I freeze.

So in an attempt to get rid of the windchill, I've just got an Aldi Winter Jacket which is advertised as windproof and rain resistant, which I expect to wear with a baselayer only, - but I still expect to overheat in the current temperature. is there anything "wrong" with just wearing the jacket by itself ( other than the chest hair in the zip pain)?

is this "normal"? I keep seeing the "3 layer rule" - base, top & outer, but in my experience to date, I'm more using a 2 layer, and just a S/S top on the way home at 15 deg c.

Is this a mixture of the stuff I've got being cheap ( Aldi/Lidls) other than an 2009 Altura NV Jacket, or I'm I just unfit, and therefore generating a lot more heat than most?

Ta!
Intent on Cycling Commuting on a budget, but keep on breaking/crashing/finding nice stuff to buy.
Bike 1 (Broken) - Bike 2(Borked) - Bike 3(broken spokes) - Bike 4( Needs Work) - Bike 5 (in bits) - Bike 6* ...

Posts

  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    IME this is the trickiest time of year. Cold when you set off, but quickly too warm for many layers.

    SS baselayer / SS jersey / windproof gilet and armwarmers probably the most versatile at the mo.

    Later on I'll switch to LS thermal/wicking baselayer and Phantom softshell which has zip-off sleeves, and only add a merino mid layer if it's freezing.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    Try a sleeveless baselayer with your aldi jacket and unzip it as you warm up.

    Or do s/s jersey, base layer, arm warmers and gilet.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    I always go for a base layer no matter what the weather. It just feels odd otherwise.

    A winter jacket is a step too far currently - I think you need a gilet - that's what I've been wearing on the bike lately together with ss top, armwarmers and the base.

  • So in an attempt to get rid of the windchill, I've just got an Aldi Winter Jacket which is advertised as windproof and rain resistant, which I expect to wear with a baselayer only, - but I still expect to overheat in the current temperature. is there anything "wrong" with just wearing the jacket by itself ( other than the chest hair in the zip pain)?
    I bought this Aldi softshell jacket (in yellow) yesterday and wore it on my commute today:
    https://www.aldi.co.uk/en/specialbuys/thur-24-sep/product-detail/ps/p/mensladies-winter-cycling-jacket/
    A cold morning, but with a thermal base layer and the jacket over it I was nice and warm on my 18 mile commute. Coming home at 4pm it was a bit warmer so I wore the jacket on its own and it felt absolutely fine.

    If I was pushing hard on the bike it would probably be too hot, but on a steady commute it was good. Previously my top layer was a thin Altura waterproof to keep out the cold, but it was like a tent in the wind so not aero at all, whereas the tight fitting Aldi jacket was much better.
  • Hi.
    I'm currently planning my winter commuting routine of 10miles each way (~30 mins) , and I'm trying to find the appropriate way to keep warm & dry for a budget without overheating - I've got rid of the car now, so have no choice!
    I'm trying to work out the right mix of layers, and can't seem to get it right at the moment, but it's not that cold yet at 6 degrees C when I leave in the morning.

    I've just started wearing a L/S polaris baselayer and a S/S top , and within 2 minutes I'm warm enough, but if it's windy I freeze.
    If I change the S/S top to a L/S Jersey, I overheat, again unless it's windy, then I freeze.

    So in an attempt to get rid of the windchill, I've just got an Aldi Winter Jacket which is advertised as windproof and rain resistant, which I expect to wear with a baselayer only, - but I still expect to overheat in the current temperature. is there anything "wrong" with just wearing the jacket by itself ( other than the chest hair in the zip pain)?

    is this "normal"? I keep seeing the "3 layer rule" - base, top & outer, but in my experience to date, I'm more using a 2 layer, and just a S/S top on the way home at 15 deg c.

    Is this a mixture of the stuff I've got being cheap ( Aldi/Lidls) other than an 2009 Altura NV Jacket, or I'm I just unfit, and therefore generating a lot more heat than most?

    Ta!

    Riding in Autumn is a case in flexibility of kit.

    A gilet is a must have item, useful all year round. Put it on first thing in a morning to keep the chill of your chest. A variety of baselayers is a good idea, short sleeve and long sleeve. Arm warmers and knee/leg warmers. Oversocks are a good choice at this time - more to keep rain and censored from dirtying your shoes!

    A long sleeve 'roubaix' fabric jersey is also adaptable. You could even wear this in the winter with a gilet.
  • Don't discount wearing a jumper! Seriously - it is not a long commute so you don't need cycling specific kit. Long sleeve cotton T short for me at the moment.
  • I find the Aldi Jackets too warm for anything other than rides around zero degrees. A long sleeve jersey with a windproof Gilet seems to do the job between 5-10 degrees with a long sleeve base layer under 5 degrees.
  • wolfsbane2kwolfsbane2k Posts: 2,965
    I find the Aldi Jackets too warm for anything other than rides around zero degrees. A long sleeve jersey with a windproof Gilet seems to do the job between 5-10 degrees with a long sleeve base layer under 5 degrees.

    I can't get away with just a lidl LS jersey, as I over heated yesterday on the way in, 9 C outside

    Just used the aldi compression layer & lidl LS top today, hoping to get the wicking layer in, and , quite surprised by it. While walking the dog at 7 C, I was freezing cold and felt that I was colder than if I wasn't wearing it . But when actually on the bike half an hour later at almost 8C, it was perfect.

    It's all about understanding the capabilities of your gear I guess!
    Intent on Cycling Commuting on a budget, but keep on breaking/crashing/finding nice stuff to buy.
    Bike 1 (Broken) - Bike 2(Borked) - Bike 3(broken spokes) - Bike 4( Needs Work) - Bike 5 (in bits) - Bike 6* ...
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    I find the Aldi Jackets too warm for anything other than rides around zero degrees. A long sleeve jersey with a windproof Gilet seems to do the job between 5-10 degrees with a long sleeve base layer under 5 degrees.

    I can't get away with just a lidl LS jersey, as I over heated yesterday on the way in, 9 C outside

    Just used the aldi compression layer & lidl LS top today, hoping to get the wicking layer in, and , quite surprised by it. While walking the dog at 7 C, I was freezing cold and felt that I was colder than if I wasn't wearing it . But when actually on the bike half an hour later at almost 8C, it was perfect.

    It's all about understanding the capabilities of your gear I guess!

    I have some LS thermal base layers that are a compression fit (bargain in the M&S sale!). Brilliant on the bike at keeping me warm and wicking moisture. If I wear them round the house or pottering round the garden I'm colder than without them...
  • ..

    A gilet is a must have item, useful all year round. Put it on first thing in a morning to keep the chill of your chest. A variety of baselayers is a good idea, short sleeve and long sleeve. Arm warmers and knee/leg warmers. Oversocks are a good choice at this time - more to keep rain and censored from dirtying your shoes!

    ..
    +1
    Sometimes you're the hammer, sometimes you're the nail

    strava profile
  • iPeteiPete Posts: 6,076
    At this time of year when the morning commute can be much colder I'm in a thin armless mesh base layer, arm warmers, regular jersey (Gabba when nasty out) and gillet. Then opt for normal or 3/4 bibs.

    When it's cold both ways, like 5-8 degrees or lower then it's time for a good windstopper jacket.
    I'm bit of a race snake in fit so tend to use either a Mavic eschappee or my favourite, the Rapha Pro Team jacket. In a downpour Mud-guards keep the bulk of water away and the jackets are cosy for an hours commuting, no need for waterproof.

    As for removing the base layer, depending on the jacket, if it isn't fleece lined you can just end up feeling sticky and hot instead of hot.
  • awaveyawavey Posts: 2,368
    it doesnt really feel like winter (or even that autumnal yet) where I live,so Ive only added arm warmers to my normal summer gear, though my knees are beginning to feel the chill so Ill probably be onto knee warmers next as it starts to get cooler.

    but people feel the cold differently I saw plenty of people last year go right through in just short sleeve tops & shorts.
  • 964cup964cup Posts: 1,359
    I agree that this is tricky weather, especially if you're starting early in the morning, but coming home not too late, as the temps are so different. Rain not helping either.

    If it's supposed to be dry, I tend to go with merino SS base, merino/mid-weight (think Rapha) arm warmers, normal mid-weight SS jersey and gilet (which comes off once I warm up), Roubaix shorts with lightweight knee warmers and merino socks with thin shoecovers. If it's going to rain, then it's the same base, but either a Gabba and Nanoflex arm-warmers, or a (waterproofed) LS softshell, with Nanoflex bib-knickers. I try to avoid packable-type rain jackets as I just boil in the bag in these conditions. I still find I overheat coming home, but then I have a big (by London standards) hill at the end of my commute.
  • Where's a good place to buy gear? I'm also a newbie, I've got my bike and helmet, but now need to buy some clothing. Are the likes of Wiggle etc my best bet?
  • 964cup964cup Posts: 1,359
    DHB roubaix kit from Wiggle is good value, although they no longer seem to do the (excellent) bibs. Castelli Cafe may still have some deals, although it's a bit late. Planet-X do very good value bundle deals if you can live with the branding; their base layers, socks, shoecovers etc are always at good prices. Endura's BaaBaa merino range is a also a good shout for base layers, socks (especially) and warmers - just search to see who's discounting it most today.
  • navrig2navrig2 Posts: 1,558
    Also worth borrowing from other sports and activities.

    I discovered last year that my Decathlon ski socks made a big difference to keeping my feet warm in the winter. They are a mix of wool/silk/man made and are quite long but not overly thick (ski boots tend to provide most of the insulation these days) meaning they don't compress my feet. Having that extra layer between knee and ankle works quite well.
  • rumbatazrumbataz Posts: 796
    Where's a good place to buy gear? I'm also a newbie, I've got my bike and helmet, but now need to buy some clothing. Are the likes of Wiggle etc my best bet?

    Wiggle are very good overall - not always the cheapest though, but they price-match in most cases. Plus, if you spend loads with them then you get at least 12% off a list-price item, though sadly not 12% off any discounted price.

    Their live chat is okay (although not always great - depends who you get answering) and their returns policy is excellent.

    I've bought some stuff off eBay too and have had no issues with brands that would generally be looked down upon.

    The key is to spend hours doing research and reading reviews. Sizing can be an issue and many reviews will state the reviewer's height and weight and which size they bought of an item of cycling clothing. I've found this generally helps (but not always!).
  • Don't discount wearing a jumper! Seriously - it is not a long commute so you don't need cycling specific kit. Long sleeve cotton T short for me at the moment.


    Really?
    Well, if it's ten Miles then you're likely to get a little warm and sweaty either way.Layer up,

    Do get some cheap longs, some base layers a decent jacket. I find that I get very hot in a matter what but in the winter, when it is raining, and you have to get changed then nothing around with our mourners knee warmers legwarmers and four layers is not nice when you're soaking wet. It's not even talk about going home and putting wet kit on.
    http://twitter.com/mgalex
    www.ogmorevalleywheelers.co.uk

    10TT 24:36 25TT: 57:59 50TT: 2:08:11, 100TT: 4:30:05 12hr 204.... unfinished business
  • Where's a good place to buy gear? I'm also a newbie, I've got my bike and helmet, but now need to buy some clothing. Are the likes of Wiggle etc my best bet?

    Wiggle are very good overall - not always the cheapest though, but they price-match in most cases. Plus, if you spend loads with them then you get at least 12% off a list-price item, though sadly not 12% off any discounted price.

    Their live chat is okay (although not always great - depends who you get answering) and their returns policy is excellent.

    I've bought some stuff off eBay too and have had no issues with brands that would generally be looked down upon.

    The key is to spend hours doing research and reading reviews. Sizing can be an issue and many reviews will state the reviewer's height and weight and which size they bought of an item of cycling clothing. I've found this generally helps (but not always!).

    I find Wiggle a mixed bag now, I used to have a platinum discount but really it's worthless most of the time as it doesn't apply to anything which is already discounted. Many times I'd have been better off going with full rrp and my platinum discount rather than the sale price. They are good in many other respects though, the dhb gear is generally excellent, and when buying bikes on the c2w scheme they stick to any sales prices when many lbs don't because of the premium they have to pay to the scheme administrators.
  • +1 for base layer, LS top and windproof gilet.

    I'm still in mitts but last Friday morning I wished I'd put my Sealskins gloves on.

    Keep a cheap waterproof jacket in your back pocket in case it chucks it down. DHB do one for peanuts. Yes you'll sweat in it, but it won't be often and you're not riding far. Don't over think it.
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