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CO2 tyre inflators

rumbatazrumbataz Posts: 796
edited September 2015 in Road beginners
I've bought a PDW Shiny Object CO2 Inflater and was wondering how far a single CO2 cartridge will inflate a road bike tyre. This is in case I ever have to use one to pump up a spare tube.

Essentially I'd like to know the process of pumping up tyres in the event of a puncture - is it just one or more CO2 cartridges on their own, or CO2 plus using a manual pump based on your experiences.

Posts

  • singletonsingleton Posts: 1,644
    I use CO2 and my advice would be to try it in the safe confines of home before you need to do it in the dark and wet down a country lane.... But beware, it gets very cold and your skin can freeze to the cartridge.

    A single 16g cartridge can get a 25mm road tyre up to a decent pressure - I don't carry a pump, just a co2 cartridge.
  • Okay, that's great. I've got 6 spare cartridges to play around with at the moment so will use up one or two getting used to it.
  • JackPozziJackPozzi Posts: 1,191
    And be aware that co2 tends to leak out of tubes faster than air. No problem using it on a ride but advisable to either drain the tube and pump up normally when you get home or at least make sure you top up the air before next ride
  • singletonsingleton Posts: 1,644
    And be aware that co2 tends to leak out of tubes faster than air. No problem using it on a ride but advisable to either drain the tube and pump up normally when you get home or at least make sure you top up the air before next ride

    Yes that's good advice. On the few occasions I've used the co2, I've emptied the tyre and reinflated properly when I got home.
  • Okay, many thanks guys. Some great advice!
  • CiBCiB Posts: 6,098
    One cannister will do 1½ inflations; I carry a couple just in case. Get the foam sleeve that protects fingers from the sudden freezing that occurs when you use one.

    Don't buy them in blister packs of 2 from a bike shop; go to any online catering supplier and buy them in bulk for a fraction of the price. I had a lifetime's supply a few years ago (box of 32) for £17 + p&p, compared to 2 for £7.99. Shops have to make a living but there's a limit.
  • I thought to get a little air into the new tube before you put it in the tyre, you needed a small mini pump, before you attach the C02 inflator to inflate the tyre fully?
  • NeXXusNeXXus Posts: 854
    I thought to get a little air into the new tube before you put it in the tyre, you needed a small mini pump, before you attach the C02 inflator to inflate the tyre fully?
    I blow into the valve. Have never carried a hand pump, always co2
    And the people bowed and prayed, to the neon god they made.
  • grenwgrenw Posts: 785
    I thought to get a little air into the new tube before you put it in the tyre, you needed a small mini pump, before you attach the C02 inflator to inflate the tyre fully?

    I do that but only because I've only ever used the co2 once so still not comfortable without a known backup. The once I did use it was a revelation though.
  • Also, make sure you know which canister your inflator requires. You get threaded and non-threaded.
  • Also, make sure you know which canister your inflator requires. You get threaded and non-threaded.

    Ah, good point!

    I got one CO2 canister with the inflater and that is threaded as the inflater is threaded so will be fine, but I also ordered a bulk pack of 6 more CO2 cartridges as they were on special offer and I've just checked and they are also threaded. Thanks for the heads up.
  • Also remember that CO2 escapes from inner tubes considerably faster than regular air - so if you inflate with CO2 today, you might well find the tyre well on the way to being flat in the morning. The solution of course is simple: let it down and pump it back up with a pump.
  • Also remember that CO2 escapes from inner tubes considerably faster than regular air - so if you inflate with CO2 today, you might well find the tyre well on the way to being flat in the morning. The solution of course is simple: let it down and pump it back up with a pump.

    Also remember it's always worth checking the previous posts ;-)
  • drlodgedrlodge Posts: 4,824
    I inflate my 23c tyres to around 60-80 psi with a small Hand pump first, then top up with CO2, using about 1/2 a cannister. That way you can do 2 tyres with 1 cannister should you get 2 flats.

    Always carry a pump as well by the way...
    WyndyMilla Massive Attack | Rourke 953 | Condor Italia 531 Pro | Boardman CX Pro | DT Swiss RR440 Tubeless Wheels
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  • Also remember that CO2 escapes from inner tubes considerably faster than regular air - so if you inflate with CO2 today, you might well find the tyre well on the way to being flat in the morning. The solution of course is simple: let it down and pump it back up with a pump.

    Also remember it's always worth checking the previous posts ;-)

    Worth reinforcing :)
  • redveeredvee Posts: 11,921
    Get the foam sleeve that protects fingers from the sudden freezing that occurs when you use one.

    To counter the endothermic reaction I use 2" of an old inner tube over the cannister when inflating, much cheaper.
    I've added a signature to prove it is still possible.
  • navrig2navrig2 Posts: 1,556
    To reduce the risk of skin freeze and sticking to the cylinder cut a short section from an old 23mm tube and slide onto the cylinder. It should provide enough of a barrier and insulation to prevent sticking.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Or wear mitts in the summer and gloves in the winter ?
  • I think the one I bought comes with a leather or sImilar kind of sleeve for the CO2 cartridges. Will try it all out at the weekend.
  • redveeredvee Posts: 11,921
    Another point of note:

    Make sure the tube is in the tyre correctly and not pinched by it. A gentle inflation by a hand pump can move the tube as it inflates but a sudden 100psi can make the new tube useless and a waste of a cannister. It happened to me first time I used cannisters.
    I've added a signature to prove it is still possible.
  • Waste of a canister

    Another problem I had is....
    Inflate the inner tube
    Unscrew pump off the inner tube
    Pssssst ! The inner core of the valve got stuck inside the pump. 100psi to 0psi in 1 second.

    I screwed the inner core back in the valve and tried again, It took me a few attempts to sort out the sticky inner core (used a bit of chain oil in the end). Thankfully it was with a hand pump. If it was a CO2 canister I would have been f**ked.
    "The Prince of Wales is now the King of France" - Calton Kirby
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