First 30....done

llebend
llebend Posts: 27
edited September 2015 in Commuting chat
So, my first commute in London is done. I completed 15 miles each way from Uxbridge to Paddington, in the stinking rain.

It is about 1 hour 15 minutes each way, simply down to towpath traffic and the slowness of the initial route finding commute, bike hub is a bit vague and it is a complex route from way out west into Westminster.

I had to jelly baby up on the way home to avoid a bonk, but in general it was fine. I got a puncture literally as I rolled up to my front door in Uxbridge......

Comments

  • Nice one.

    Same again tomorrow?
  • rower63
    rower63 Posts: 1,991
    Wow what a pair of days to inaugurate the commuting. Everything else will be a breeze by comparison. Bear in mind the vast majority of punctures happen in the wet, so remember to inspect tyres and pick out embedded shards before every wet ride.
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  • Wow what a pair of days to inaugurate the commuting. Everything else will be a breeze by comparison. Bear in mind the vast majority of punctures happen in the wet, so remember to inspect tyres and pick out embedded shards before every wet ride.

    This^^^. I'm planning to abandon my previous puncture protection strategy (only riding my commute in the dry!) and therefore really ought to think about getting some new tyres and looking after them a bit better!

    I do about 14 miles each way in the summer. It's a good distance to feel like you are actually getting some training done/building your fitness as well as getting from A to B.
  • The age old question:

    "Why do you get more punctures in the wet?"

    My answer is you don't.
    Water does not affect the penetrability of rubber.

    I think what happens is that you remember the punctures in the wet because it is so much more uncomfortable! Those punctures mended on a warm sunny day are easily forgotten.

    Although the theory that the debris from bushes i.e. thorns etc and other bits of rubbish are washed into the road, roughly to the are where you ride does hold some water.



    No pun intended.
  • I used to live in Uxbridge and did many rides into London along the A 4020. Not the best route, especially around Hillingdon/Southall, but then it gets better towards Ealing/Acton/Shepherds Bush. I never found a fast alternative to the A 4020. That route got me to Marble Arch in 50 minutes on a good day. In summer try the canal path, it goes from Uxbridge to Paddington... but it will take you 1 hour 30 or more
    left the forum March 2023
  • rower63
    rower63 Posts: 1,991
    ..."Why do you get more punctures in the wet?"
    My answer is you don't.
    Water does not affect the penetrability of rubber....
    I disagree. For my reasoning see a piece I wrote about it on my little website:http://www.slidingseat.net/cycling/cycling.html#punctures
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  • ..."Why do you get more punctures in the wet?"
    My answer is you don't.
    Water does not affect the penetrability of rubber....
    I disagree. For my reasoning see a piece I wrote about it on my little website:http://www.slidingseat.net/cycling/cycling.html#punctures

    Very good website!

    I like the theory that the water "lubricates" the cause of the puncture into the tyre, and that had never occurred to me.
    However, I'm not certain that rubber is easier to cut when wet.
    As described above the water might act as a lubricant on the implement cutting the rubber, but it won't change the properties of the rubber.

    However I'm willing to be proved wrong!

    (My above comments are not meant to be argumentative, just opening a discussion).
  • warreng
    warreng Posts: 535
    I definitely get more punctures in the wet

    I was guessing that there is more debris in the road and when the tyres are wet there's some sort of capillary action thing going on that "attracts" the sharp stuff and helps work it in. But then it's a long time since I was at college and I was pretty much stoned the entire time anyway
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  • Wow what a pair of days to inaugurate the commuting. Everything else will be a breeze by comparison. Bear in mind the vast majority of punctures happen in the wet, so remember to inspect tyres and pick out embedded shards before every wet ride.

    This^^^. I'm planning to abandon my previous puncture protection strategy (only riding my commute in the dry!) and therefore really ought to think about getting some new tyres and looking after them a bit better!

    I do about 14 miles each way in the summer. It's a good distance to feel like you are actually getting some training done/building your fitness as well as getting from A to B.

    I did my first 15-miles each way hilly Highland commutes in January on a 10-year-old MTB. There's much to be said by getting the worst of it out of the way. The only problem with the Highlands is that Spring doesn't arrive until the middle of May
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  • I definitely get more punctures in the wet

    +1 definitely. On Conti GP4000Ss, I can pretty much guarantee a puncture in the wet. A lot less frequent in the dry (even on the rubbish Contis)

    Personally I subscribe to the lubrication theory. Of course rubber doesn't change its properties when wet but, if you want to test the lubrication theory, try braking hard on a wet sheet of wet metal or glass. In fact, just try braking with rubber brake blocks on metal rims in the wet.

    I think there's something to be said about small bits of debris sticking to the tyre. I'm less convinced about debris being washed out. It might play a role though.
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • I had to jelly baby up on the way home to avoid a bonk,

    I used to have this and put it down to expending nervous energy from not knowing where you are going and not being used to the traffic... in other words it gets a lot easier very quickly
  • Thanks all!

    I did not cycle today - worked from home in the morning and then came in for the afternoon only, not worth the hassle. I will cycle in tomorrow though. I figure that 2 or 3 times a week into central London for a full day in the office is worth it. TBH, I often spend my Friday, generally, at a sub office that is about 5 miles from my house, so, technically I was cycle commuting in London anyway as I always cycle there.....but personally feel that 5 miles is hardly worth 'blowing ones own trumpet' about.

    Still, it would be nice to have some cycle routes from way out on the fringes going back into the city - proper routes rather than made up hashes sharing footpaths and subways. The cost of living is pushing more of the 'workers' to live out and commute, which is a bit of a false economy with travel costs in a lot of cases.

  • Still, it would be nice to have some cycle routes from way out on the fringes going back into the city - proper routes rather than made up hashes sharing footpaths and subways. The cost of living is pushing more of the 'workers' to live out and commute, which is a bit of a false economy with travel costs in a lot of cases.

    People move out in search of space, rather than cheaper. I was renting a 5 bedroom semidetached in Buckinghamshire, which is by no means a cheap county for the same rent of a 1 bed converted flat in Richmond.
    Now I live in the Midlands where a large two bed cost about half of the above.
    left the forum March 2023
  • itboffin
    itboffin Posts: 20,062
    out here in the wilds when it rains you definitely stand a higher chance of punctures because all the crap washes off the fields into the already bad single track lanes, much tonights little gem of flint i had embedded in my front tyre.

    happy days and all that.
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  • Not sure why this became a thread about punctures, but anyway: water acts as a weak adhesive, meaning it allows debris to stick to the tyre when the contact patch of rubber leaves the tarmac ... rotation after rotation debris pierce the tyre. Without this initial bonding, it is more difficult for debris to do that.
    Then of course heavy rain washes fresh and potentially sharper debris onto the road
    left the forum March 2023
  • .....but personally feel that 5 miles is hardly worth 'blowing ones own trumpet' about.

    5 miles is better than nothing.
    One less car on the road etc etc.
  • .....but personally feel that 5 miles is hardly worth 'blowing ones own trumpet' about.

    5 miles is better than nothing.
    One less car on the road etc etc.

    You are right, I was being facile. Doing anything is better than nothing! I just don't count it as my default setting would be 'cycle', for this distance anyway.

  • Still, it would be nice to have some cycle routes from way out on the fringes going back into the city - proper routes rather than made up hashes sharing footpaths and subways. The cost of living is pushing more of the 'workers' to live out and commute, which is a bit of a false economy with travel costs in a lot of cases.

    People move out in search of space, rather than cheaper. I was renting a 5 bedroom semidetached in Buckinghamshire, which is by no means a cheap county for the same rent of a 1 bed converted flat in Richmond.
    Now I live in the Midlands where a large two bed cost about half of the above.

    Interesting point. We have a few friends who have moved from areas like Notting HIll out to Northfields, they could get more for their money - so, I guess it is both space and potential reduction in overhead. Sadly, it then puts up the prices in places like Northfields.....then the Northfields people decide to cash in and move further out to Langley, Windsor and so on. We moved out years ago.....I would like to move back in, but it is pretty damn expensive now!

  • Still, it would be nice to have some cycle routes from way out on the fringes going back into the city - proper routes rather than made up hashes sharing footpaths and subways. The cost of living is pushing more of the 'workers' to live out and commute, which is a bit of a false economy with travel costs in a lot of cases.

    People move out in search of space, rather than cheaper. I was renting a 5 bedroom semidetached in Buckinghamshire, which is by no means a cheap county for the same rent of a 1 bed converted flat in Richmond.
    Now I live in the Midlands where a large two bed cost about half of the above.

    Interesting point. We have a few friends who have moved from areas like Notting HIll out to Northfields, they could get more for their money - so, I guess it is both space and potential reduction in overhead. Sadly, it then puts up the prices in places like Northfields.....then the Northfields people decide to cash in and move further out to Langley, Windsor and so on. We moved out years ago.....I would like to move back in, but it is pretty damn expensive now!

    Pretty much impossible... in Uxbridge for 300 K you can still buy something that doesn't look like a crumbling ruin in the worst ghetto on the planet, but as you move inwards, even half a million buys very little indeed.

    When I rented in Richmond, my neighbour, according to Zoopla's overinflated estimates, made about half a million on her property in 3 years! Even assuming she only made half of that, it's probably way more than she earned in three years after tax with her job... it's just printing money, it's completely meaningless
    left the forum March 2023
  • Meaningless and wrong.

    Everybody needs to make money, that's life, but when housing gets so expensive it is hard for our children to get out of home and onto the property ladder.

    But that's a whole new argument......

  • Still, it would be nice to have some cycle routes from way out on the fringes going back into the city - proper routes rather than made up hashes sharing footpaths and subways. The cost of living is pushing more of the 'workers' to live out and commute, which is a bit of a false economy with travel costs in a lot of cases.

    People move out in search of space, rather than cheaper. I was renting a 5 bedroom semidetached in Buckinghamshire, which is by no means a cheap county for the same rent of a 1 bed converted flat in Richmond.
    Now I live in the Midlands where a large two bed cost about half of the above.

    Interesting point. We have a few friends who have moved from areas like Notting HIll out to Northfields, they could get more for their money - so, I guess it is both space and potential reduction in overhead. Sadly, it then puts up the prices in places like Northfields.....then the Northfields people decide to cash in and move further out to Langley, Windsor and so on. We moved out years ago.....I would like to move back in, but it is pretty damn expensive now!

    Pretty much impossible... in Uxbridge for 300 K you can still buy something that doesn't look like a crumbling ruin in the worst ghetto on the planet, but as you move inwards, even half a million buys very little indeed.

    When I rented in Richmond, my neighbour, according to Zoopla's overinflated estimates, made about half a million on her property in 3 years! Even assuming she only made half of that, it's probably way more than she earned in three years after tax with her job... it's just printing money, it's completely meaningless

    not meaningless if you sell up

  • not meaningless if you sell up

    It is a very British thing to believe that the property market creates wealth... it doesn't... it does redistribute wealth, more often than not going one way from the more deserving and in need to the least deserving and less in need.

    Interestingly, those making the most profit are the same lot going on about cutting benefits and putting a cap on immigration...
    left the forum March 2023

  • not meaningless if you sell up

    It is a very British thing to believe that the property market creates wealth... it doesn't... it does redistribute wealth, more often than not going one way from the more deserving and in need to the least deserving and less in need.

    Interestingly, those making the most profit are the same lot going on about cutting benefits and putting a cap on immigration...

    I agree with that the British obsession with owning property totally distorts our economy (ie people borrow to invest in property rather than increasing productivity) and it does not create wealth in terms of GDP. On a personal level it can transform peoples lives by selling up in the south east and moving somewhere cheaper that allows them to live mortgage free or buy a business. I would also agree this is a tiny %.

    On the plus side the BoE is getting better at pulling levers to cool the lending market and Osborne has the buy to let brigade's inexplicable tax breaks in his sights.
  • On the plus side the BoE is getting better at pulling levers to cool the lending market and Osborne has the buy to let brigade's inexplicable tax breaks in his sights.

    We have a flat that we rent out (only property, as we rent ourselves at the time was not bought as buy-to-let) because we cannot sell it just yet (short lease renewal it's going to take 12-18 months and cost a lot of money). There is no tax break that I am aware of... it's all taxed and now there is even a landlord licence to pay, among the interminable list of expenses.

    I am not sure how the buy-to-let brigade make money, as we seem to put in a lot more than we get out. If you consider that the mortgage we pay is mostly interest, the only profit is probably the increase in value of the property.

    I would be surprised if after 5 years we make more than 20 K on it, which to be honest doesn't even get close to pay for the hassle, as I am pretty sure we could have saved 20 K without having that burden.
    left the forum March 2023
  • dhope
    dhope Posts: 6,699
    On the plus side the BoE is getting better at pulling levers to cool the lending market and Osborne has the buy to let brigade's inexplicable tax breaks in his sights.

    We have a flat that we rent out (only property, as we rent ourselves at the time was not bought as buy-to-let) because we cannot sell it just yet (short lease renewal it's going to take 12-18 months and cost a lot of money). There is no tax break that I am aware of... it's all taxed and now there is even a landlord licence to pay, among the interminable list of expenses.

    I am not sure how the buy-to-let brigade make money, as we seem to put in a lot more than we get out. If you consider that the mortgage we pay is mostly interest, the only profit is probably the increase in value of the property.

    I would be surprised if after 5 years we make more than 20 K on it, which to be honest doesn't even get close to pay for the hassle, as I am pretty sure we could have saved 20 K without having that burden.

    Think it was the BTL that did it through a company and were able to put interest payments against profits or tax or similar. So they got a lump in savings there. I may be completely wrong. IANALOBTLL
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  • rower63
    rower63 Posts: 1,991
    the ultimate morphing thread: 1st commute => punctures => property market philosophical
    Dolan Titanium ADX 2016
    Ridley Noah FAST 2013
    Bottecchia/Campagnolo 1990
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    http://www.slidingseat.net/cycling/cycling.html
  • On the plus side the BoE is getting better at pulling levers to cool the lending market and Osborne has the buy to let brigade's inexplicable tax breaks in his sights.

    We have a flat that we rent out (only property, as we rent ourselves at the time was not bought as buy-to-let) because we cannot sell it just yet (short lease renewal it's going to take 12-18 months and cost a lot of money). There is no tax break that I am aware of... it's all taxed and now there is even a landlord licence to pay, among the interminable list of expenses.

    I am not sure how the buy-to-let brigade make money, as we seem to put in a lot more than we get out. If you consider that the mortgage we pay is mostly interest, the only profit is probably the increase in value of the property.

    I would be surprised if after 5 years we make more than 20 K on it, which to be honest doesn't even get close to pay for the hassle, as I am pretty sure we could have saved 20 K without having that burden.

    Think it was the BTL that did it through a company and were able to put interest payments against profits or tax or similar. So they got a lump in savings there. I may be completely wrong. IANALOBTLL

    you are correct plus you could get a wear and tear tax deduction worth 10% of total rent received. Reading between the lines people were making a tax loss on their BTL to offset against their personal income tax. Osborne has started to crack down and can not see him stopping.
  • dhope
    dhope Posts: 6,699
    the ultimate morphing thread: 1st commute => punctures => property market philosophical
    You'd never get it in commuting general.

    First commute => tumbleweed
    Punctures => tumbleweed
    Property market philosophical => take it to commuting chat
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