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Aquaplaning technique or hardware?

Clockworkmark31Clockworkmark31 Posts: 1,053
edited September 2015 in MTB general
Done some local rides recently and with the ground getting wet/boggy.

Carrying speed on a bridleway or canal or on a DH section and you hit a patch of wet boggy mud. No way of avoiding it. Is there a technique to approaching it?

So far my results have been a bit hair raising. Hit it with speed, leg out to balance like Rossi and shifting the weight and angle of the front wheel.

If you have experienced it you will know what I am talking about.

Any safer technique that won't see me in the canal or a tree? Other than scrubbing the speed off?

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  • ilovedirtilovedirt Posts: 5,798
    Manual.
    Production Privee Shan

    B'Twin Triban 5
  • Lean back and unweigh the front wheel if you cant manual. Also really helps in sand.
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  • I find getting out of the saddle helps you move your weight around to stay upright, being in a suitably slack gear and keep pedalling as your forward motion will also aid staying upright..
  • As you hit the puddle, hit your front brake as hard as you can while moving you weight forward...

    The as you start to launch of the bars remove your hands from your grips, and stretch forward it a suitable superman pose...

    This is surely the best technique :P
  • Can a bike even aquaplane?
  • Can a bike even aquaplane?

    Yes, but only at about 80mph
  • Can a bike even aquaplane?

    Yes, but only at about 80mph

    It was the only word I could think of that describes hitting a big mud soup puddle thing at speed.

    Maybe under and over steer would be more suited. I'm sure you all know what I mean.

    Don't fancy doing a superman into a canal or a tree. I will try it once the snow arrives haha.

    My manuals well I can't even call them manuals. Already out of the seat, will try shifting the weight over the rear next time.
  • There's a few boggy bits on one of my rides, most notably one 2foot mud pool after another, probably about 6 of these in a row, I basically rely on carrying sufficient speed into them to get most of the way through, but before I hit the first one, drop down a gear or 5, get out of the saddle and pedal and pray lol, it's quite tricky as the back end floats about all over the shop, so I'm kinda wrestling for balance while trying to keep going forwards by pedalling at the same time!
  • step83step83 Posts: 4,044
    Carry speed, notch it down a couple of cogs before you hit it. You will scrub speed hitting it but as said, lean back up an off the saddle an be ready to pedal keep loose an try not to jolt the bars keep it smooth.
  • Thanks guys but they aren't quite 2 foot deep. I'm talking maybe 3-4 inches deeps and maybe 10 feet in length. Carrying speed is not my problem (maybe I am approaching them with too much). As soon as I hit them, both wheels are wanting to go in different directions. Almost feels like when you hit a patch of ice and the wheels just want to wash out. Wonder if my tires aren't up to the job, or if it is still technique.
  • I'd say technique.. I'm no master by any stretch, but it's a matter of keeping balance, I. E stand on the pedals slightly so you can shift your weight and shift the bike just before you hit it, and carry as much speed as you can, then get out of the seat and peddal the second you start bogging down so you don't slow to the point you have to put your foot down into the mud, or fall off

    If it's ten feet long and 3 inches of gloop, speed alone should carry your most of the way, assuming you can have a decent run up to it and hit it straight at a decent pace. Should have said that at the start actually, line yourself up for it before hand, don't hit it whilst turning.
  • I'd say technique.. I'm no master by any stretch, but it's a matter of keeping balance, I. E stand on the pedals slightly so you can shift your weight and shift the bike just before you hit it, and carry as much speed as you can, then get out of the seat and peddal the second you start bogging down so you don't slow to the point you have to put your foot down into the mud, or fall off

    If it's ten feet long and 3 inches of gloop, speed alone should carry your most of the way, assuming you can have a decent run up to it and hit it straight at a decent pace. Should have said that at the start actually, line yourself up for it before hand, don't hit it whilst turning.

    Sorry thought my OP was clear. I am hitting them with speed and it carries me through. Don't have to peddle. I get out of my seat and sometimes put a leg out to balance me.

    It just feels like the bike wants to wash away from me. Like the bike wants to low side on me.

    On my local trails (pennine), they are on straights I line myself up and carry the speed. I will try more with moving more on the bike. I can keep my self from going in to the mud. But I was hoping there was a better technique other than holding on for the ride.
  • What tires do you use currently?

    Do a good number of miles on the canals round here and have more issues on wet bricks than mud.. Though occasional muddy patches of grass can lead to a bit of a twitch.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    Sorry thought my OP was clear. I am hitting them with speed and it carries me through. Don't have to peddle. I get out of my seat and sometimes put a leg out to balance me.

    It just feels like the bike wants to wash away from me. Like the bike wants to low side on me.
    I know the feeling, the deceleration caused by the drag pitches your weight forward, also the front wheel has a lot of gloop under it so little grip, you will lift off the harder surface underneath much easier in mud giving poor grip than you would aquaplane over (mostly) water.

    Attack position but weight back, heels down and drive 'forward' against the pedals to resist your weight being thrown forward onto the bars (and as that action is rarely equal you'll almost certainly add a very undesireable steering effect to boot).
  • Sorry thought my OP was clear. I am hitting them with speed and it carries me through. Don't have to peddle. I get out of my seat and sometimes put a leg out to balance me.

    It just feels like the bike wants to wash away from me. Like the bike wants to low side on me.
    I know the feeling, the deceleration caused by the drag pitches your weight forward, also the front wheel has a lot of gloop under it so little grip, you will lift off the harder surface underneath much easier in mud giving poor grip than you would aquaplane over (mostly) water.

    Attack position but weight back, heels down and drive 'forward' against the pedals to resist your weight being thrown forward onto the bars (and as that action is rarely equal you'll almost certainly add a very undesireable steering effect to boot).

    Yes this is what I was trying to explain.

    Front wheel just looses grip, I stick a leg out and end up in all manner of positions trying to keep it upright.

    Think I have got what you are suggesting, will give it a try. Thanks
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