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160mm rotor to 180mm

powell7powell7 Posts: 52
edited September 2015 in MTB general
Hi guys
I'm planning on replacing my 160mm rotors to 180mm.
Is it worth me changing both or do I change just the front?
I see alot of people running 180 front 160 rear but wasn't sure if I can run both at 180?
Thanks chris

Posts

  • Depends of the type of riding you're doing. Lots of high speed may warrant 180mm rear but otherwise keep it at 160mm. Bare in mind it's easy to lock up the rear wheel under braking due to weight shifting to the front so a 180mm will offer more power but lock easier while a 160mm will still easily lock up if you want it but you'll generally have more feel and control.
    Bird Aeris : Trek Remedy 9.9 29er : Trek Procaliber 9.8 SL
  • Change the front, if you think you need a bigger rear then change that as well. No reason to do both at the same time.
  • Thanks guys I'll try the front first
  • On a similar note, is there any problem with skipping sizes e.g 200 front 160 rear?
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    No problem, use what you need.
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  • Daz555Daz555 Posts: 4,040
    Rotor? Is than an Americanism? Don't care too much, just curious.

    I've always referred to the disc part of a disc brake as a disc. Anyone else?
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  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    I use rotor as it seems to annoy people.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • I would refer to the rotating part as a rotor.
  • As far as I'm aware rotor is originally the American term. They call the discs on cars rotors too.

    The brakes on our bikes are known disc brakes not rotor brakes. I personally call them discs, but I don't really mind if people call them rotors, I'm sure we all know what is meant by either rotors or discs.
  • I believe rotor would be the correct technical term for the disc. It's all a bit irrelevant anyway.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Except when it annoys people.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • Would mention what rotors you are planning to use first. Someone maybe able to save you some money.

    I learnt the hard way before and purchased some hope floating rotors 180 front 160 rear and never got to use them due to the rivets catching.
  • I have Tektro Auriga 160 front and rear on my Rockrider. Is it possible to change the front disc to a 180 without changing the caliper, or would I need a new caliper as well?
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    You'll need an adapter. 160 to 180. Whatever it is fork (post or IS) to whatever it is caliper (post or IS).
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

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  • So it's just a case of moving the caliper to the new position (obvious, really) - is there an upper limit? Presumably a caliper designed for a 160mm disc would have a maximum size disc it would work with due to the extra force exerted by a larger disc.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Nope, unless they are made of cheese the callipers will be fine. I have the same brakes (Deore M615) on 160 and 203 fronts.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • M615 are great. I have had mine a couple years at least, never bled them and they're still good. In the Alps this summer in a group of 9 I had the cheapest brakes and was the only one who didn't have to bleed them, which meant more time for beer which is good!
  • Update guys
    I got a deal on a pair of 180's and took them out for a ride today.after bedding them in I can houstly say it's like iv completely upgraded my entire brake set up.they have a smooth feel and the bite when it's needed is unbelievable compared to the 160's.

    Very happy and would recommend to anyone who wants abit more to go for at least a 180 front.
    All I had to do was buy the discs and mounts, set them up and bed them in
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    That may be more an issue with your Auriga's than disc size, I can easily lift the rear wheel with my 160mm front, so don't need any more brake.
  • To be fair I've not had any problems as yet, but I was just checking in case I felt the need to do so in the future. Knowledge is power, and all that!
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