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My first attempt at a build.

steeeevosteeeevo Posts: 27
edited September 2015 in Your road bikes
Now I know some people don't agree with these 'alternative' bikes but thought I'd post this as its my first go at building my own. Not quite finished. Requires some decent pedals and saddle and to swap the yellow electrical tape for something more suitable.

All in all I'm happy with it..

Yes I am fully aware it will probably snap and kill me but what I will be careful I promise.

Sorry if the links don't work. Also my first time.

B15F90CD-9C29-4382-AB67-CBC69BF93719_zpsh8rc6xac.jpg~original

5CB64477-CAAD-4416-9446-6D061BAA95B5_zpswuqv85zb.jpg~original


A55AC78A-EE96-4BAA-B082-00FADB75871E_zpseile0g6j.jpg~original

Posts

  • kayodotkayodot Posts: 143
    Needs more spacers
  • sandyballssandyballs Posts: 570
    Needs more spacers

    Definitely and more cable, you can never have too much cable. They will pull tight after about 2 revolutions of the bar and that could prove dangerous.
  • t4tomot4tomo Posts: 2,643
    Not sure about the stickers either, had they run out of "Chinarello" ones.
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  • steeeevosteeeevo Posts: 27
    Thanks for the replies but why do I need more spacers?

    Could you explain little more? I take it you're talking about the steerer?

    I can't fit any more spacers on there.

    Also with the cables, I turned the steerer to the most extreme position and then gave myself some extra before cutting. Surely this is enough, no?

    I appreciate any comments.
  • steeeevosteeeevo Posts: 27
    You guys are having me on right?
  • JoeblackJoeblack Posts: 829
    They are having you on, although this isn't for me I commend you for building it up yourself, Iv recently gone down the road of building and servicing my own bikes and it's a very tough but satisfying process until you've done it a while.

    The stem is super high on the steerer. If you've had a bike fit then fine leave it as that if not then look at getting one and see if you can reduce the stack height a little. However in the end it's what's comfortable that matters most.

    Regarding the cables the others are referring to the length of them. You do seem to have been a bit generous with the outters. When I did mine I tried to keep them as short as possible without affecting the turning of the bars.

    Ps :- not nipping out and getting black tape to finish the bars is just lazy *slapped wrists*
    One plays football, tennis or golf, one does not play at cycling
  • steeeevosteeeevo Posts: 27
    Joeblack wrote:
    They are having you on, although this isn't for me I commend you for building it up yourself, Iv recently gone down the road of building and servicing my own bikes and it's a very tough but satisfying process until you've done it a while.

    The stem is super high on the steerer. If you've had a bike fit then fine leave it as that if not then look at getting one and see if you can reduce the stack height a little. However in the end it's what's comfortable that matters most.

    Regarding the cables the others are referring to the length of them. You do seem to have been a bit generous with the outters. When I did mine I tried to keep them as short as possible without affecting the turning of the bars.

    Ps :- not nipping out and getting black tape to finish the bars is just lazy *slapped wrists*


    Thanks Joeblack for your grown up response. It's nice to know that there are some people who, even if they don't agree with what you are doing, they will still offer their assistance rather than just being mean. Big meanies!

    However I understand some people don't agree with the whole Chinarello thing and I guess their comments are to be expected.

    The whole height of the bars and length of the cables is really just me being extra cautious. I thought if I cut the cables and then needed to raise the bars, I might run out of cable so put them at the highest point to start with. Believe me, I want them as short as possible too but didn't want to cut too much off to start with. It does look a little silly doesn't it. I will have a re-jig.

    Unfortunately when I finished the bike at 1am, I doubt anywhere was open that sold black electrical tape!

    I have given it a small, easy road test and all seems ok so far. No strange noises etc.

    Fingers crossed for the future.
  • jgsijgsi Posts: 5,025
    Good... I'll be generous 6/10. NOw undo it all and build again.
    Seriously dont ride that hard on the road.... if you hit a major pothole at speed, I fear for that steerer tube and yourself.
  • Ber NardBer Nard Posts: 827
    Seriously dont ride that hard on the road.... if you hit a major pothole at speed, I fear for that steerer tube and yourself.

    Absolutely. You joke about the bike snapping and killing you but with that many spacers under the stem, it's a real possibility. Think of the leverage the handle bars and stem have got over the steerer. Seriously, for safety more than aesthetics, you need to cut it shorter.
  • steeeevosteeeevo Posts: 27
    Good... I'll be generous 6/10. NOw undo it all and build again.
    Seriously dont ride that hard on the road.... if you hit a major pothole at speed, I fear for that steerer tube and yourself.

    Where can I make up the extra 4/10 in your opinion?

    I have lowered the stem almost down to the bottom. Is it just that having the stem up too high is dangerous in your opinion or you fear for the build quality?

    Re undoing it and building it again, are you just being mean as well or do you have a valid reason for that? Serious question.
    Ber Nard wrote:
    JGSI[/url]"]Seriously dont ride that hard on the road.... if you hit a major pothole at speed, I fear for that steerer tube and yourself.

    Absolutely. You joke about the bike snapping and killing you but with that many spacers under the stem, it's a real possibility. Think of the leverage the handle bars and stem have got over the steerer. Seriously, for safety more than aesthetics, you need to cut it shorter.

    Now this does explain it a bit more. Thanks, like I said I have lowered it now.
  • steeeevosteeeevo Posts: 27
    Better?

    IMG_1470_zpsnyzyffmy.jpg~original
  • Yellow PerilYellow Peril Posts: 4,466
    Dude it's only better if it's still comfortable enough to ride. I think you've done a good job but just be careful, these snide framesets can lead to expensive dental treatment.
    @JaunePeril

    Winner of the Bike Radar Pro Race Wiggins Hour Prediction Competition
  • 964cup964cup Posts: 1,359
    Better?

    IMG_1470_zpsnyzyffmy.jpg~original
    Better, but...

    Cables are still too long at the front.
    I think the outer is too short, on the other hand, for the top-tube to rear brake connection.
    Shifters look to me to be too high up on the bars; you need to move them down the drops, and then rotate the bars to get the part of the hoods where your hands go to be horizontal. This will increase the effective reach and saddle to bar drop, so be sure you're comfortable with it.
    When you've got the bar height correct, you need to cut the steerer tube. If you don't have a cutting guide, get your LBS to do it. If you do, remember that you need either to leave about 2mm above the stem, and then use a 5mm spacer, or to cut it about 3mm below the top of the stem (so that the top cap doesn't touch the steerer tube when you tighten it up); which you choose depends in part on stem design. You may choose to leave a bit more above the stem, say 7mm with a 10mm spacer so as to have some room for adjustment.
    Suggest you go over the whole bike with a torque wrench checking every bolt before you try any serious riding. It's easy to have forgotten to tighten something, with consequences ranging from a taxi ride to an ambulance.
    Check your chain length, too - it's hard to tell because the driveside pic you posted has it in the small ring and halfway up the cassette. Post one with it in big front small rear, or small front big rear if you want anyone else's opinion.
  • steeeevosteeeevo Posts: 27
    IMG_1474_zpsmpplihnr.jpg~original

    How's this? look?

    Do you mean the part of the outer that protudes near the seatpost needs to be longer?

    I have noo issue with cutting the steerer tube. I have already done it once would you believe!! I took about 2-3 inches off but again, didn't want to overdo it.I will do this once I'm happy it's set up right.
  • steeeevosteeeevo Posts: 27
    Dude it's only better if it's still comfortable enough to ride. I think you've done a good job but just be careful, these snide framesets can lead to expensive dental treatment.

    Thanks Yello wPeril.
  • JoeblackJoeblack Posts: 829
    Yes he is referring to your rear brake cable looks too short.

    Bike looks a lot nicer with the stem lowered, well done.
    One plays football, tennis or golf, one does not play at cycling
  • 964cup964cup Posts: 1,359
    How's this? look?
    Looks a bit long to me. Shimano SOP says that the RD cage should be vertical when in that gear (*but* this can vary if you are running a wide-ratio cassette). You may find that the jockey wheels are running on each other when you're in small front and small rear (which is bad, there should always be some tension in the derailleur). The other test is to go big-big and check that the chain is still making an S-shape through the cage (i.e. is not pulled straight because the chain is too short). Have a look, and then, if you're using a quick-link (you should be) try taking one link out and check small-small and big-big.
    Do you mean the part of the outer that protudes near the seatpost needs to be longer?
    Yes. Otherwise a) you'll struggle to keep the brake central and b) braking performance will be affected. You'd normally expect the outer to describe a curve from the top-tube to the brake, with the peak of the curve about 1 to 1.5cm above the exit point from the top tube.
    I have noo issue with cutting the steerer tube.
    Cool. Be sure to do it outside and/or wear a decent mask. Carbon dust is not your friend.
  • steeeevosteeeevo Posts: 27
    IMG_1475_zpsdpjiekre.jpg~original

    Ok, the chain will get sorted. I have shortened the cables as much as i dare and lengthened the rear part of the brake cable.
    On a test ride, the stem does feel a little low but I will tinker withh that.
  • jgsijgsi Posts: 5,025
    You can do better with the cable runs... take a look at some bike setups
    https://youtu.be/w8PqH7bltJQ
    is for bar tape but gives you an idea on how close you can cut....
    you never go lock to lock on a road bike.. its not a mountain bike.

    if ever you ride on the drops, you will quickly feel how far away those levers will be... hence the suggestion of dropping them down.

    Practising bike builds leads to good competent practice - buy some cheap cable outers/inners of Ebay .
    This is all good work.

    re stack height
    fork11.jpg
    Threadless forks with carbon fiber steering columns have special concerns. There is a limit to the amount of spacers between the stem and the headset. Too many spacers may stress the carbon fiber and lead to failure. Contact the fork manufacturer for limits in regards to your fork. Generally, manufacturers recommend no more than 20mm additional stack height between stem and upper race.

    To raise bar height, a flipped stem that has a greater angle may be a solution.
  • 964cup964cup Posts: 1,359
    IMG_1475_zpsdpjiekre.jpg~original

    Ok, the chain will get sorted. I have shortened the cables as much as i dare and lengthened the rear part of the brake cable.
    On a test ride, the stem does feel a little low but I will tinker withh that.
    Brake cable looks good. WRT cable length, here's a couple of my builds for contrast:

    viewtopic.php?f=40044&t=13028778
    viewtopic.php?f=40044&t=13034266

    As JGSI said, the easiest way to get some additional stem height is to flip the stem; you can also try using a (slightly) shorter stem to reduce the reach.
  • Starting to look better now. The forks look like a strange fit though. Never seen the bottom of a headtube stick out that far above a fork crown before.
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  • where did you get the frameset from?
  • Ignoring the obvious (cable lengths / steerer tube length) you MAY want to re-cut the front mech outer and splice in an inline adjuster. I've just re-built my Dolan using full DA9000, and I read a lot about the front mech needing good cable tension on it in order for it to achieve the "sublime" front changes, something that wouldn't be possible without an inline adjuster. As the 6800 and the 9000 front mech are of a similar design, it may be that you want to think about fitting one as well (and, FWIW, the front change IS as spectacular as everyone says it is. I've not ridden Di2 but, with a front change as good as this, I'm not sure I need to!).

    But chapeau on the build. Doing it the first time isn't easy. Nice work!
  • arlowoodarlowood Posts: 2,420
    Thanks for the replies but why do I need more spacers?

    Could you explain little more? I take it you're talking about the steerer?

    I can't fit any more spacers on there.

    Also with the cables, I turned the steerer to the most extreme position and then gave myself some extra before cutting. Surely this is enough, no?

    I appreciate any comments.


    Irony, sarcasm in evidence above I'm afraid.

    Essentially your build deviates from what the pedants expect ie steerer trimmed with no spacers above the stem if at all possible and the cables cut to the minimum required to allow the bars to be turned.

    It's your first build so well done for that. If you're happy with the set up then ignore those sniping from the sidelines or at least take a view on whether you want to take action based on their comments
  • People arent really being sarcastic. The stem was raised dangerously high and with all the spacers left above the stem you'd be in real danger of ripping your nuts off if you went over the bars :shock:
    Also, the cables are way too long. People do take pi$$ somewhat on here but generally they know a decent bike setup from an iffy one.
    Well done on the build though. Its a learning curve like everything else.
    argon 18 e116 2013 Vision Metron 80
    Bianchi Oltre XR Sram Red E-tap, Fulcrum racing speed xlr
    De Rosa SK pininfarina disc
    S Works Tarmac e-tap 2017
    Rose pro sl disc
  • 964cup964cup Posts: 1,359
    People arent really being sarcastic. The stem was raised dangerously high and with all the spacers left above the stem you'd be in real danger of ripping your nuts off if you went over the bars :shock:
    It's not the nuts, really, it's the danger of serious spleen damage if you land on the protruding steerer. The cable thing is (at the front) mostly aesthetics, although the longer the cable run, the less precise the gears will be because there's more cable to stretch. Having large loops of outer at the front is also an invitation to tangling with something (e.g. a protruding branch on a leafy lane) in my view.

    It occurs to me that the OP should also check that his bar end caps are securely in place. Every time I see someone (especially a flat bar rider) without end caps, I want to stop them and suggest they Google "handlebar through leg". Don't do it on Images unless you have a strong stomach.
  • where did you get the frameset from?

    genuinely interested op
  • Just get a new bar stem. Looks like you would benefit more from an adjustable one. Ignore the ones poking fun at you... They hate themselves for not having red cables.
  • Hi,

    Thanks for all the extra comments. I hadn't realised since I last posted.

    I appreciate all the comments, including the negatives. I HAVE shortened/tidied up the cables further. The steerer tube WILL be cut once I have had a fit and am happy where it needs to be. Inline adjusters ARE on order. LBS also suggested this after I threw a hissy fit after a whole day of fighting the front mech!

    I've covered around 100 tentative miles so far, including some quickish descents. No issues so far. I remain aware that a problem could occur at any time and so am being careful still.
    jimmyt-11 wrote:
    jimmyt-11 wrote:where did you get the frameset from?

    I bought it from a private seller who bought it online from China. That's all I know I'm afraid. I have since asked where he got it from but have had no reply!!
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