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Bag advice to fit full sus frame

xyra123xyra123 Posts: 10
edited August 2015 in MTB buying advice
Been a lurker for a while, but first post here, so hi!

I've recently bought a Specialized Camber Evo (small frame) and having trouble finding a way to store tools/keys/etc whilst riding.

I've tried;
Saddle bags, but unless they are very small they tend to get hit by the suspension on full compression and I intend to add a dropper post so they are out

Rucksacks, not a fan - I'd rather be able to strap the bits to the bike (to me the vehicle should carry the load, not me)

Currently I'm using a water bottle with bits inside but that doesn't fit the frame very well either

I don't think a ti-bag would fit the frame particularly well, and all the frame bags I've seen look like they are designed to fit the upper corner by the seat post where the shock is located. (the front top corner of the triangle is a very small gap, at least on the small frame.

Any other ideas, or should I just stick with my current bits in the water bottle concept?

Many thanks for any advice!

Posts

  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    You can get purpose designed tool kits that fit in bottle cage mounts (which are designed to cope with 3/4 of a Kilo).

    Personally you are better off with the weight attached to you not the bike, much easier to control the weight.
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    i would not consider anything other than a camelbac type thing. holds eveything i need.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
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  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    i would not consider anything other than a camelbac type thing. holds eveything i need.

    +1 Camelbak. Tools, water, sarnies, spare tubes, Haribows etc all in one place. And once you get used to it, it feels weird to ride without it. And you're going to have to carry water on all but the shortest rides and there's no better way to sup.
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • xyra123xyra123 Posts: 10
    Thanks guys, I will give the hydro pack another go.

    I've got a couple kicking around from a few years ago when I regularly did long rides. I use to use them on long rides but seem overkill on a an after work quick 30 mins or hour around the local trails which is what I mainly do now.

    Thanks for the advice
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    For a quick local ride I don't bother with tools, and only take water if it's hot.
    I don't do smileys.

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  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    Thanks guys, I will give the hydro pack another go.

    I've got a couple kicking around from a few years ago when I regularly did long rides. I use to use them on long rides but seem overkill on a an after work quick 30 mins or hour around the local trails which is what I mainly do now.

    Thanks for the advice

    The smaller packs like the Camelback Octane XCT are perfect for that.

    http://shop.camelbak.com/octane-xct/d/1307

    Very neat when it sits on your back and holds just what you need if you're not on an all day epic.
    For a quick local ride I don't bother with tools, and only take water if it's hot.

    Yes, depending on the ride, I might just be taking water. If the walk back in the event of mechanical failure is not much more than an hour then I wouldn't bother with tools and spares.
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • PXR5PXR5 Posts: 203
    I use a Topeak Aero wedge bag strapped under the saddle to hold a few essential items - but if you use a dropper post it has to be the strap on type bag not the clip on type (the angles change as the post drops). In a medium size bag i always keep spare inner tube plus tyre levers plus multi tool. If the ride is about one hour then water in a water bottle on the frame, any longer than its the camelback equivalent which has more than enough room for everything else.
    Every time I go out, I think I'm being checked out, faceless people watching on a TV screen.....
  • xyra123xyra123 Posts: 10
    Thanks - I'll get down to a local stockist and take a proper look at some of the up to date packs (my current ones are about a decade old). Even on local rides I need to carry keys/inhaler (both which hurt a lot if you fall on them if they're in a pocket) and normally an allen key (lack of aforementioned dropper post).

    Do the hydration valves leak less than they did a decade ago? :)
  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    Thanks - I'll get down to a local stockist and take a proper look at some of the up to date packs (my current ones are about a decade old). Even on local rides I need to carry keys/inhaler (both which hurt a lot if you fall on them if they're in a pocket) and normally an allen key (lack of aforementioned dropper post).

    Do the hydration valves leak less than they did a decade ago? :)

    No, they don't leak at all. Well, my Octane doesn't, anyway. I also use an inhaler so I have one that lives in the Octane permanently so that I don't have to think about it.
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • batmobatmo Posts: 277
    There are bags designed to fit on the top tube, butted up against the stem, like this one. Reasonable alternative?
    Viscount Grand Touring - in bits
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  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    There are bags designed to fit on the top tube, butted up against the stem, like this one. Reasonable alternative?

    I'd be surprised if that stays put once it gets rowdy.
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • jamskijamski Posts: 737
    I bought a hydropack from Mountain Warehouse for £16 at the weekend! Hasn't split a drop yet, and enough room for various bits inside. Think it's £20 now, but still a bargain.

    viewtopic.php?f=10002&t=13033352
    Daddy, Husband, Designer, Biker, Gamer, Geek
    Bird Aeris 120 | Boardman Team 650b | Boardman Pro FS | Calibre Two.two
  • xyra123xyra123 Posts: 10
    Went out at the weekend to Swinley (nice riding, not been there before) and took my old hydropack with me (minus the bladder which was looking less than appetising after sitting damp for 8 years or so...). Still found I got the exceptionally sweaty back which is what put me off in the first place - perhaps a more modern design will help?

    I have found a much flusher fitting bottle holder now so for shorter rides I can fit a 500ml bottle on the small frame to stick basic tools/keys in. Longer rides I will persevere with the hydropack for now and see how I get on.
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    Specialized make a bottle cage with multi tool and mini pump attachment and a stem top cap with a built-in chain tool. Tube can be tied to the underside of the top tube.
  • Newer camel back used here . Not too sweaty in use. Think it's the mule. Ideal for me . One tip be careful where you place a pump as heard tragic tale of one causing spinal injury . I peronally regard mine as a form of protection. Halfords had better price than many online stores.
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