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Do you just know?

MattFTMattFT Posts: 178
edited August 2017 in Road buying advice
I seem to be on a never-ending search for comfortable cycling shoes. Spec, Sidi, Bont and NW all tried. No matter which, I either get hotspots, pins and needles or both. Different footbeds aren't helping either.

So my question - did you just know when you tried on your favourite and most comfortable pair of shoes? Was it love at first wear? Or did they have to grow on you? I ask because the "lets try it out" path is getting expensive. Is there hope that just going to a shop with a great selection and trying everything on will yield the perfect pair?
FCN: 4

My Condor R.I.P.

Enigma Echo - everything outside the city
Genesis Day One Disc - commuter

Posts

  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 10,481
    Tried mine on fitted as I wanted, not to narrow or to wide and put my custom moulded insoles in them and still riding. I have a pair of serfas commuting type trainer and shimano rt32 touring type road shoes have no problems with either on comfort or fit. Must be lucky, also had some halfords dhb lookalikes and they where ok as well.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • deswellerdesweller Posts: 5,175
    I just make sure they are wide enough with thick-ish socks - any tightness is bad. Stiff soles give a more even pressure distribution, which also helps. I also find that doing plenty of stretches of my feet and the odd spot of running also helps.
    - - - - - - - - - -
    On Strava.{/url}
  • DKayDKay Posts: 1,652
    If you're getting hotspots regardless of shoes and footbeds, then your issue could more than likely be your feet. A friend of mine was always getting 'hot foot' and in the end he had to go under the knife to get it sorted.
  • ai_1ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    If you're getting hotspots regardless of shoes and footbeds, then your issue could more than likely be your feet. A friend of mine was always getting 'hot foot' and in the end he had to go under the knife to get it sorted.
    It's more than likely feet rather than shoe suitability? Really?
    Is this just based on a single anecdote or is there more to back this up?
    I've heard plenty people talk of "hotspots" but this is the first time I've heard of surgery being necessary to solve the issue because the foot was the problem.
  • DKayDKay Posts: 1,652
    Let's look at it this way, the OP says that he's tried numerous shoes and footbeds, all to no avail. So that points towards his feet being the issue. My friend was finding that his discomfort was becoming quite severe, despite changing shoes and footbeds to little, or no effect. He went under the knife and he's now fine.

    Fair enough, my story is anecdotal, but just because you've never heard of surgery being required, doesn't make it any less valid.

    http://www.foot-pain-explored.com/burning-foot-pain.html
  • term1teterm1te Posts: 1,462
    Could it be your cleat position? I've got some normally very comfortable Sidi's, but after I replaced some worn cleats I was getting cramp along the outside of one foot. It took me a couple of weeks to realise that I one cleat was not alignned properly. I moved it to its correct (for me) position, and the shoes went back to being as comfortable as ever.
  • ilm_zero7ilm_zero7 Posts: 2,213
    you're unlucky - assuming the shoes are wide enough then Sidi are by far the most comfortable i have worn - but give the Supplest a try - they were comfy, just didnt breathe to well in 30 deg C temperatures
    http://veloviewer.com/SigImage.php?a=3370a&r=3&c=5&u=M&g=p&f=abcdefghij&z=a.png
    Wiliers: Cento Uno/Superleggera R and Zero 7. Bianchi Infinito CV and Oltre XR2
  • MattFTMattFT Posts: 178
    Thanks everyone. I'm not sure about surgery - I don't have the problem with other footware or running shoes. So I guess I just keep on going. I do have mid-wide feet and need a big toebox. Onwards I guess.
    FCN: 4

    My Condor R.I.P.

    Enigma Echo - everything outside the city
    Genesis Day One Disc - commuter
  • DKayDKay Posts: 1,652
    Thanks everyone. I'm not sure about surgery - I don't have the problem with other footware or running shoes. So I guess I just keep on going. I do have mid-wide feet and need a big toebox. Onwards I guess.

    Neither did my friend and he used to play lots of other sports on a regular basis. Just because the problem doesn't manifest itself with your other footwear, doesn't mean that your feet aren't the source of the issue.
  • MattFTMattFT Posts: 178
    Thanks everyone. I'm not sure about surgery - I don't have the problem with other footware or running shoes. So I guess I just keep on going. I do have mid-wide feet and need a big toebox. Onwards I guess.

    Neither did my friend and he used to play lots of other sports on a regular basis. Just because the problem doesn't manifest itself with your other footwear, doesn't mean that your feet aren't the source of the issue.

    Fair enough. I'll see if I can find a doctor who knows about these things and get it checked out. I'm not giving up on the shoes though :) Good point on cleats too. I'll get another fitting I think. I had one before I switched to speedplay so things could be different.

    @all, so would anyone be able to hazard a guess at the shop with the biggest selection of shoes in London?
    FCN: 4

    My Condor R.I.P.

    Enigma Echo - everything outside the city
    Genesis Day One Disc - commuter
  • Did you manage to get this fixed? Im in the market for a new pair of sheos to sort out my plantar fasciitis.
  • DMT, Specialized and Giro/Rapha are my go to brands for comfortable road shoes.
  • ryan_w-2ryan_w-2 Posts: 1,162
    Top end Fizik or Lakes are your solution. Like wearing slippers but cost upwards of £200....
    Specialized Allez Sprint Disc --- Specialized S-Works SL7

    IG: RhinosWorkshop
  • dannbodgedannbodge Posts: 1,029
    The DHB R1.0s I had were really comfy. Which was helped by them being very soft.

    Replaced with Fizik R3bs and they aren't as comfy but getting there.

    Next up I want some Sworks shoes
  • dinyulldinyull Posts: 2,979
    I've only ever had 2 pairs and both were fine.

    I have found that comfort can be affected by having them done up too loose, or too tight though.

    Maybe I'm just lucky???
  • joey54321joey54321 Posts: 1,297
    I went through a bunch of shoes and it was getting expensive so decided to go to cyclefit and do it properly. Accurate measurement taken by a knowledgeable guy + footbeds = sorted. It's expensive, but so is trying every pair of cycling shoes.
  • prhymeateprhymeate Posts: 792
    MattFT wrote:
    I do have mid-wide feet and need a big toebox. Onwards I guess.

    When you tried Sidi shoes, were they the normal sizes or their wide 'mega' sizes? I have pretty wide feet and find their mega sized shoes really comfortable.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,817
    Road shoes are race specific and have a carbon sole and they are very stiff. They are OK for 4-5 hours, but become increasingly uncomfortable after... especially if you have to go on your pedals up a climb. Typically you will experience burning toes.

    MTBike shoes can be more forgiving and paradoxically more suited to long distance road cycling, but even there you need to avoid the high end, race oriented carbon soled ones and go for the rubber soled ones.

    Basically, the more you spend, the less you get, because your money will buy you stiffness and power transfer rather than comfort. I have a pair of Sidi Genius 7 wide plant, which are very good for up to a hundred miles, but for longer rides I prefer to use an old pair of Shimano XC 30 with SPD cleats
  • ryan_w-2ryan_w-2 Posts: 1,162
    I disagree with the above.

    I have some S-Works Sub 6 shoes (top of the range, pro tour shoe), and I have completed 14 hour days in the saddle with them without any issues whatsoever.

    They did 1,050 miles over 8 days and were perfect (for me).
    Specialized Allez Sprint Disc --- Specialized S-Works SL7

    IG: RhinosWorkshop
  • neebneeb Posts: 4,445
    To answer the question in your title - in my case, yes. Switched to Bont Vaypor+ a couple of years ago and they were instantly an uncannily perfect fit. But I have a wide forefoot and usually have the problem that I either get pinched toes or else need to go a half size up to get a wide enough fit, which causes other problems.

    You need to find a shoe that is exactly the same shape as your foot and where there is a size that fits you perfectly. Not easy.

    But that's not to say that the problems you are having are necessarily down to fit alone.
  • mouthmouth Posts: 1,195
    neeb wrote:
    Bont Vaypor+


    I have little (ie none) experience with cycling shoes, but Bont do amazing custom work for roller skates - both for speed skating (they also produce ice boots) and roller derby, which is enough for me to take a look at them when I do get round to purchasing a pair. I know several people who use or have used Bont gear with little to no complaint. Excellent product support also, at least for the skates.

    For some models it is possible to send a mould of your foot off to them and a boot is produced accordingly, for others it's a case of going to a dealer and trying them on - they should have a series of 'slippers' for sizing so the right length/width arrives, and some are heat mouldable. It isn't quite as simple as putting them in the oven with your Sunday roast, but not much more complicated either. Personally, its a good deal of cash to throw at something so I'd be paying a visit and taking a recommendation from a trained fitter.
    The only disability in life is a poor attitude.
  • neebneeb Posts: 4,445
    The Vaypor+ are heat mouldable at home, but mine were such a good fit out of the box I've never needed to try that.
  • 964cup964cup Posts: 1,362
    No-one can tell you which shoes will work for you, since they don't have your feet. However, that wasn't the question you asked. I can only say that I know instantly when a shoe won't work for me, but need a long ride to know if it will. I've also found cycling shoe sizing to be even more arbitrary than any other footwear; I have shoes (from different manufacturers) in 42, 43, 44, 44.5 and 45, all of which are individually good fits. I have also found that arch support makes a difference, as does pedal action - since my back operation, which has affected my hip angle, I've started to get hot spots having never had them before; adding arch support and focusing on souplesse has helped.
  • mac9091mac9091 Posts: 196
    Well i'm hoping that you can get used to a new pair of shoes having just forked out on a pair of carbon soled fiziks.

    I moved from an entry level Shimano pair that i put up with being slightly too loose and not having much of an arch support (as i have womens feet apparently). The fiziks felt like a good fit when trying them on, although when i put the cleats on and went for a ride, i noticed that i was getting pain on the outside of both feet, indicating that they are too narrow but i'm hoping they just need some time to stretch and my feet need to adjust to the stiffer sole.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,817
    mac9091 wrote:
    Well i'm hoping that you can get used to a new pair of shoes having just forked out on a pair of carbon soled fiziks.

    I moved from an entry level Shimano pair that i put up with being slightly too loose and not having much of an arch support (as i have womens feet apparently). The fiziks felt like a good fit when trying them on, although when i put the cleats on and went for a ride, i noticed that i was getting pain on the outside of both feet, indicating that they are too narrow but i'm hoping they just need some time to stretch and my feet need to adjust to the stiffer sole.

    WOuldn't hold my breath
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