Best Inner Tube for descending Alps

gotwood25
gotwood25 Posts: 314
edited June 2015 in Road buying advice
Ok, currently run Vittoria latex tubes and have heard mixed stories regarding their suitability for mountain descents. So what would you guys recommend?

I am running Shamal Milles with Schwalbe Ones and am a terrible descender, lots of nervy braking just so you have a fuller picture.

Cheers

Comments

  • bendertherobot
    bendertherobot Posts: 11,684
    Are they the tubeless compatible versions? If so, get Schwalbe One tubeless and all your cares will melt away.
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  • mfin
    mfin Posts: 6,729
    Don't expect your Mille's braking surface to stay looking new for too long if you are really brake happy.

    Brush up on descending tips before you go, poor descenders can improve a hell of a lot from remembering a few things and practicing them at every opportunity.

    Just swap for any old butyl inner tubes like Continental supersonics if you want a bit of peace of mind while you're there.
  • mamba80
    mamba80 Posts: 5,032
    Ok, currently run Vittoria latex tubes and have heard mixed stories regarding their suitability for mountain descents. So what would you guys recommend?

    I am running Shamal Milles with Schwalbe Ones and am a terrible descender, lots of nervy braking just so you have a fuller picture.

    Cheers

    I use Vitt latex tubes (and Michelin ones too) in the alps with no probs at all, but should you want a great butyl alternative, try some spesh turbo tubes, they are really reliable, used them for years with no probs, conti SS are too thin and would be more prone to heat than latex ever would be.
    its the fitting of the latex that gives them a bad rep, the tube gets pinched, it rides ok until the rim heats up and bang... the tube goes, latex is actually more resiliant to heat than a thin butyl tube.

    jus try and let your brakes off and then reapply, rather than just dragging them constantly, gives the rim chance to cool down.
  • mfin
    mfin Posts: 6,729
    Sorry, I meant Conti Race 28's and for some reason said the supersonics!
  • stueys
    stueys Posts: 1,332
    latex is slightly more susceptible to heat build up but, unless you really drag the brakes, on alu rims i suspect you will be fine. I came down Sa Calobra a few weeks back running latex and that has lots of short, sharp bends that require some hard braking if you are heading down at speed, no problems at all.
  • fleshtuxedo
    fleshtuxedo Posts: 1,856
    Vittoria ultralite are the perfect inner tubes IMO - balance of durability/weight/price is spot on
  • DeVlaeminck
    DeVlaeminck Posts: 8,882
    I use latex tubes in the Alps - touch wood haven't had a problem.
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
  • DeVlaeminck
    DeVlaeminck Posts: 8,882
    Although having looked at the forecast for mid 30 degrees in the Alps next week when I'm going to be there and just having googled latex and heat I may make a last minute trip to a bike shop tomorrow for some lightweight butyls if only because I don't want to be coming down some mountain at 50mph and remember this thread !
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
  • gotwood25
    gotwood25 Posts: 314
    Appreciate the feedback, good advice and has gone some way to alleviate my worries. Had a week in the dolomites coming down twisty hairpins on them without a blowout but will still swap to butyl for peace of mind. I normally use tubs so never been a concern for me but ended up buying the Milles for the better braking (which I have to say is superb!) which they don't do in a tub.

    Cheers again
  • itboffin
    itboffin Posts: 20,061
    I think the best advise for high mountains is tyre pressures set correctly ie not what you'd ride at sea level.

    Also triple check your pads and rims I've had a rim that was practically concave which I discovered when I got back to the UK and pads that don't stop when going over 50 mph.

    Brown trousers moment and a half
    Rule #5 // Harden The Feck Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • gotwood25
    gotwood25 Posts: 314
    I think the best advise for high mountains is tyre pressures set correctly ie not what you'd ride at sea level.

    Also triple check your pads and rims I've had a rim that was practically concave which I discovered when I got back to the UK and pads that don't stop when going over 50 mph.

    Brown trousers moment and a half

    Yeah just bought a few packs of the Campag Blues, stopping power is incredible on them however they do burn through very quickly.
  • itboffin
    itboffin Posts: 20,061
    Better that than having to use your foot against a wall to slow down, which I had too.

    Also managed 99 kmph on that same ride 8)
    Rule #5 // Harden The Feck Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • stueys
    stueys Posts: 1,332
    To add, I took some latex tubes down the Mortirolo yesterday whilst every motor biker from Germany had decided they all wanted to ride up together :? They coped with that, far better than my frazzled nerves did anyway