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Others riders drafting

morgan_blakemorgan_blake Posts: 12
edited July 2015 in Road beginners
So I was out riding this morning quite early. I was on a flat 25 mile loop and putting in a good effort. I catch up with a rider ahead and go by him. I realise he is now following me, inches from my back wheel.

This continued for about 15 minutes until we arrive at traffic light which were red. He pulled up next to me but about half a bike length back, I was waiting for him to say something, but he didn't, just staring into the distance.

We set off, I slowed a bit when the lights went green and he waited for me to go first. Same thing happens, for 10 minutes he follows me, inches behind. We approach a roundabout and there are cars coming round, I slow and stop, he kept going and probably caused the car to slow. I see him then ride off and he seemed to get into "race mode", on his drop bars, kept looking back. I felt a bit miffed he had followed me for so long and then tried to get away from me. He had about 300m on me by the time I finally found a gap on the roundabout. I put my head down and caught upto him again, as soon as he saw me behind him (he looked a bit shocked), he slowed right down to encourage me infront.

Never once did he say anything, like "hello", or ask if it was ok to follow me so closely. I was doing about 23/24 mph.

What should I do in that situation? Just pretend they are not there??
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Posts

  • marcusjbmarcusjb Posts: 2,412
    Either don't care or give them the flick of the elbow and tell them to get up front and do some work.
  • Ber NardBer Nard Posts: 827
    You don't owe him anything so there's no reason you can't sit up and tell him you're not happy with him drafting you. Doesn't have to be confrontational; you can agree to share the work or he can drop back.
  • JackPozziJackPozzi Posts: 1,191
    Used to bother me, but I just get on with my ride now, if someone wants to sit on my wheel it's not causing any me any hardship as long as they don't ride into the back of me. TBH most of my rides now, I'm trying to target a particular effort level so it annoys me more if they do come through as sitting on screws it up...
  • Simon MastersonSimon Masterson Posts: 2,740
    To be honest, I find the prima donnas that think they own the road and will shout at anyone that so much as cycles anywhere near them the most annoying. Just get on with your ride, and/or drop them.
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 8,207
    Usually anybody that try,s to draft me gets uncomfortable as I tend to push myself until I am sure I've dropped them or change route very quickly to lose them. Did the midland monster recently and had a few lads tag on behind, not once did they take a turn at the front on the return loop, I quite enjoyed passing them again after they had passed me having rested for a bit. I find its good to be pushed occasionally, but annoys me they don't share the work.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • FlâneurFlâneur Posts: 3,027
    just remember you are better and they need the rest.

    I think it is better when they say hi, thank you or even take a turn. But at the end of the day nobody really loses.

    If someone took a tow then sprinted for a KOM I'd just be inclined to laugh.
    If it does bother you, either drop off down the outside and sit on their wheel, or ride them off your own, make them hurt
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  • Record11TiRecord11Ti Posts: 74
    To be honest, I find the prima donnas that think they own the road and will shout at anyone that so much as cycles anywhere near them the most annoying. Just get on with your ride, and/or drop them.


    Exactly, if you cant drop him he will probably beat you at the race this weekend. Or, just blow your nose a few times. OR, you could man up and help him train and you both can get faster. Why complain about it?
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 50,089 Lives Here
    To be honest, I find the prima donnas that think they own the road and will shout at anyone that so much as cycles anywhere near them the most annoying. Just get on with your ride, and/or drop them.


    Exactly, if you cant drop him he will probably beat you at the race this weekend. Or, just blow your nose a few times. OR, you could man up and help him train and you both can get faster. Why complain about it?

    Is fair enough to complain.

    I'm more than comfortable with it on the club run or when riding with friends - there's implicit trust.

    I have two broken rear wheels that say that strangers drafting you (especially without warning) isn't ideal. Unexpected traffic occurrence: slamming on brakes + unexpected drafter totals my rear wheel.

    Though fairly sure they were both triathletes, so maybe there's the problem.

    Either way, if you don't like it, feel free to say so. Just be aware, as with any communication on the bike - that it's best to aim to sound as calm as possible because you will always sound more aggressive than you mean to as you're probably blowing.
  • t4tomot4tomo Posts: 2,643
    So I was out riding this morning quite early. I was on a flat 25 mile loop and putting in a good effort. I catch up with a rider ahead and go by him. I realise he is now following me, inches from my back wheel.

    This continued for about 15 minutes until we arrive at traffic light which were red. He pulled up next to me but about half a bike length back, I was waiting for him to say something, but he didn't, just staring into the distance.

    We set off, I slowed a bit when the lights went green and he waited for me to go first. Same thing happens, for 10 minutes he follows me, inches behind. We approach a roundabout and there are cars coming round, I slow and stop, he kept going and probably caused the car to slow. I see him then ride off and he seemed to get into "race mode", on his drop bars, kept looking back. I felt a bit miffed he had followed me for so long and then tried to get away from me. He had about 300m on me by the time I finally found a gap on the roundabout. I put my head down and caught upto him again, as soon as he saw me behind him (he looked a bit shocked), he slowed right down to encourage me infront.

    Never once did he say anything, like "hello", or ask if it was ok to follow me so closely. I was doing about 23/24 mph.

    What should I do in that situation? Just pretend they are not there??

    And all this time you didn't think to say hi or start up a conversation?
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  • bob6397bob6397 Posts: 218
    Leave him for dead..

    I do that all the time to cars heading up the hill into the 1 way system in town - traffic lights at the bottom followed by a 100m climb to another set of lights.. Cars often try to get past - hilarious to sprint it and see the driver's face when they realise that you have got to the top before they have pulled out around you.. :)

    Seriously though - if anyone was drafting me - apart from a couple of mates who I trust absolutely - then I would ask them to stop. I have had people not concentrating enough behind me before now (even a couple of times on go-out-with-your-mates mtb rides or when I have gone out leading some Scout group rides off road) where people haven't noticed me slowing down even if I slow down slowly because I know they are behind me.. One time they took my mech hanger out completely - sheared it.. I was lucky nothing else was damaged.

    Ask them to stop it. If they don't, slow down until they overtake you. Then get on with riding...

    bob6397
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  • Record11TiRecord11Ti Posts: 74
    Though fairly sure they were both triathletes, so maybe there's the problem.

    As a former Elite cyclist - and IronDistance triguy...I bet your right. I NEVER let a Tri guy on my wheel or in my paceline. Thus, I rescind my prior comment.
  • jgsijgsi Posts: 5,026
    drafting.... dropping....close quarter riding in "Beginners" ?
    These skills need to be learnt methodically over time.
    Even the good get it wrong sometimes. A touch of wheels can be very expensive.

    OP if it happens again... simply tell to eff the ** off, it's your training ride not someone elses.
    By all means hook up with someone to practise the skillsets but do it on your own terms.

    Some people are born chopppers and remain choppers.
  • BrandonABrandonA Posts: 553
    Used to bother me, but I just get on with my ride now, if someone wants to sit on my wheel it's not causing any me any hardship as long as they don't ride into the back of me. TBH most of my rides now, I'm trying to target a particular effort level so it annoys me more if they do come through as sitting on screws it up...

    You can say it doesn't affect you. If the person is inexperienced then they may rear end you and damage your rear mech or cause you physical pain.

    People need to learn to take it like a man and let you ride past.

    It doesn't happen often to me but when it does I never point out pot holes our parked cars to them or any other obstruction. You have to earn the right to receive this information from me.
  • prhymeateprhymeate Posts: 792
    People need to learn to take it like a man and let you ride past.

    It doesn't happen often to me but when it does I never point out pot holes our parked cars to them or any other obstruction. You have to earn the right to receive this information from me.

    I can appreciate people don't like strangers riding close behind them for safety reasons, but that is just ridiculous. Your attitude of acting 'like a man' went out of the window pretty quick.
  • BrandonABrandonA Posts: 553
    People need to learn to take it like a man and let you ride past.

    It doesn't happen often to me but when it does I never point out pot holes our parked cars to them or any other obstruction. You have to earn the right to receive this information from me.

    I can appreciate people don't like strangers riding close behind them for safety reasons, but that is just ridiculous. Your attitude of acting 'like a man' went out of the window pretty quick.

    Luckily your opinion of me means nothing so I can live with your impression.

    Am I to a assume that you are the sort of person they can't accept that other's are faster than you and you take the free draft when you get a chance, rather than to man up and continue to ride your own ride having given maybe 2 seconds of less effort to ensure the other rider gets a safe distance away from you?

    Just because I catch you and you then decide to up your speed/effort to sit on my wheel doesn't mean that I have accepted to take on your safety. You are foolish to sit on someone's wheel when you don't know them as you never know who the person you are drafting is and what their cycling experience is.
  • Record11TiRecord11Ti Posts: 74
    I can appreciate people don't like strangers riding close behind them for safety reasons, but that is just ridiculous. Your attitude of acting 'like a man' went out of the window pretty quick.

    Additionally, more often than not the person in the rear is the one to crash. This can be seen in about every peloton crash there is (and anyone behind him). Two guys, wheel cross...rear guy goes on. I have heard many a story of the leader not knowing it even happened.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    Similar happened to me when I was out last, I flicked an elbow, he came through and we continued like this for about 15k, until he put in an attack (of some kind) on a small incline, I chased and countered, we continued like this for about 3k, by which point we were in town and had to slow anyway. Planning on riding more when I'm off tour.
  • MiddleRingerMiddleRinger Posts: 678
    If I notice somebody on my wheel for a while I'll usually drop back on the outside alongside them and start up a conversation.
  • prhymeateprhymeate Posts: 792

    Luckily your opinion of me means nothing so I can live with your impression.

    Am I to a assume that you are the sort of person they can't accept that other's are faster than you and you take the free draft when you get a chance, rather than to man up and continue to ride your own ride having given maybe 2 seconds of less effort to ensure the other rider gets a safe distance away from you?

    Just because I catch you and you then decide to up your speed/effort to sit on my wheel doesn't mean that I have accepted to take on your safety. You are foolish to sit on someone's wheel when you don't know them as you never know who the person you are drafting is and what their cycling experience is.

    You can assume what you like. Enjoy your cycling :)
  • So I was out riding this morning quite early. I was on a flat 25 mile loop and putting in a good effort. I catch up with a rider ahead and go by him. I realise he is now following me, inches from my back wheel.

    This continued for about 15 minutes until we arrive at traffic light which were red. He pulled up next to me but about half a bike length back, I was waiting for him to say something, but he didn't, just staring into the distance.

    We set off, I slowed a bit when the lights went green and he waited for me to go first. Same thing happens, for 10 minutes he follows me, inches behind. We approach a roundabout and there are cars coming round, I slow and stop, he kept going and probably caused the car to slow. I see him then ride off and he seemed to get into "race mode", on his drop bars, kept looking back. I felt a bit miffed he had followed me for so long and then tried to get away from me. He had about 300m on me by the time I finally found a gap on the roundabout. I put my head down and caught upto him again, as soon as he saw me behind him (he looked a bit shocked), he slowed right down to encourage me infront.

    Never once did he say anything, like "hello", or ask if it was ok to follow me so closely. I was doing about 23/24 mph.

    What should I do in that situation? Just pretend they are not there??

    And all this time you didn't think to say hi or start up a conversation?

    I felt like he should have sparked any conversation. I went by him, he decided to follow me. I also saw him jump a red light before I caught him. Had a nice bike a good kit, maybe even headphones.
  • slowbikeslowbike Posts: 8,490
    I felt like he should have sparked any conversation. I went by him, he decided to follow me. I also saw him jump a red light before I caught him. Had a nice bike a good kit, maybe even headphones.
    Did you not say Hi or Morning, Afternoon or any sort of greeting as you overtook? Pretty antisocial ... only reason you wouldn't say that is if you're a miserable git ... ;)

    Yes I've had people overtake me and I've jumped on their wheel for a free tow - usually when I'm in the "can't be arsed" commuting mode ... and I've had people jump on my wheel too - doesn't worry me too much eitherway - never not had a "cheers" as we split ...
  • homers_doublehomers_double Posts: 6,570
    I find a good fart drops them back a few feet.
    Advocate of disc brakes.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    Had an incident this evening on a ride, out doing some hill repeats (haven't been on the bike in about 3 weeks bad idea), on the way home, coming down a steady downhill road (about -3%); riding in a bus a bike lane (no busses) so in the middle of the lane, at about 35-40kpH. Some guy goes by me on a bike and hits a raised drain cover and comes off about 15 meters in front of me. I had to pull the brakes hard, I managed to stop, just. Spoke to him he's ok, torn jersey and shorts and scraped bike (rear hanger looked bent to me). I'm now left with a ripped rear tyre from skidding to stop, and it was because of his stupidity. He passed me under 1m from my bars.
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,689
    erratic speed changes works wonders as does a proper hard dig on the nearest ramp
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  • amaferangaamaferanga Posts: 6,789
    Only total [email protected] would draft a stranger. Would you be happy with a [email protected] tailgating you when you're driving on a motorway? They very probably are a censored cyclist / driver if they think it's in any way a smart thing to do.
    More problems but still living....
  • Finesilver24Finesilver24 Posts: 140
    Yesterday a complete stranger hopped onto my wheel as I passed him. I knew he would as I was about 2mph faster. For the next mile I rode at my own pace and pointed out several hazards including other riders, which we both avoided. After a mile or so, I went straight on and he turned left. Nothing bad happened, as usual.
  • slowbikeslowbike Posts: 8,490
    Only total [email protected] would draft a stranger.
    Ah - you see, round here most [email protected] are wearing club kit ... so they're not really strangers at all ...
  • roger_merrimanroger_merriman Posts: 6,147
    Only total [email protected] would draft a stranger. Would you be happy with a [email protected] tailgating you when you're driving on a motorway? They very probably are a censored cyclist / driver if they think it's in any way a smart thing to do.

    I suspect they feel it's the done thing to do, it is a roadie trait ( clearly not all ) same with overtaking in close proximity. I assume since that's what happens on club runs, road races they think it's the norm.

    In fairness most of the risk is to the drafter, though clearly not all, some nice chap few years ago hit the back of my wife's bike trashing the derailer.

    To be honest I tend to move out/in so they are out of the slipstream which point they tend to drop off or take the hint and move on.

    Oddly I tend to get more when on the MTB/town bike. Though normally my lines (on that bike) though potholes/puddles etc tends to dissuade all but the most dedicated of drafting fairies.
  • mpattsmpatts Posts: 962
    your options are:

    1) Sit up, slow down
    2) Give it a great big dig to drop your wheelsuck
    3) Say hello and have a chat

    Either way, I can't say it's great behaviour, but hey the world is full of people having bad days.
    Insert bike here:
  • Honesty is the best policy, say to him "your turn out in front, mate".

    or stop and let him go past.


    I remember watching this years Giro d'Italia and even one of the Orica Green Edge pros was bad for not taking their turn. Might have been Simon Clarke? As part of a 2 man breakaway he was sat on another guys wheel in the last few km of the stage and the OGE rider blatantly refused to work together.

    Cant remember the race but I've even seen some pros at the front turn around and gesticulate with their hand, shout for f's sake and get quite vocally angry about it.
    "The Prince of Wales is now the King of France" - Calton Kirby
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