Struggling to fit tyre to rim

Sam Kennedy
Sam Kennedy Posts: 32
edited August 2018 in Workshop
I just bought a set of 23mm wide carbon deep sections (50mm) and I'm trying to fit Bontrager R3 23mm tyres to the rim, however I can't fit even the first bead around the rim, there is a ton of overlap and it's way too tight to just force onto the rim.

Are 23mm tyres too small for these rims? Would getting a set of 25mm tyres help?

Thanks

Comments

  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Some tyre / rim combos are worse than others. Make sure the tyre bead is pushed right down into the rim well. If the tyre is new, the stiffer bead won't help. Ask an experienced mechanic to see if they can fit the tyre as they know all the tricks / techniques. If they're hard to fit, consider how you might deal with a puncture on the road?
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • marcusjb
    marcusjb Posts: 2,412
    As above - certain rim and tyre combos just don't work well and you do need to think strongly whether you would be able to deal with a flat on the road.

    There are some tips and tricks - pushing the tyre bead right down into the 'well' of the rim as you go, water, even washing up liquid.

    VAR levers work well with difficult tyres.

    But overall, I would avoid combinations that require massive amounts of special techniques and tools as halfway up a mountain in Wales, in a storm, in the dark, when I'm tired and it's just not happening.
  • Would going up a tyre size, to say 25mm help any?
  • marcusjb
    marcusjb Posts: 2,412
    Would going up a tyre size, to say 25mm help any?

    Hard to say.

    Generally, probably - but no guarantees.

    The problem is the bead diameter rather than anything to do with the width of the tyres.

    Certain rims might be a little over-sized in diameter, and certain tyres might be a little undersized - it only takes a mm or whatever in each direction and you've got an impossible combination.
  • bikes`n`guns
    bikes`n`guns Posts: 959
    R3`s are as tight as hell even on Bontrager rims

    Last time I fitted a new one, it was two people and two bead clamps whilst levering on.
    Trek,,,, too cool for school ,, apparently
  • white91
    white91 Posts: 431
    23mm or 25mm will make no difference, they are both for the same size rim!
  • g00se
    g00se Posts: 2,221
    Once fitted, the beads will stretch a little with time. So getting them off and on later should be easier.

    I found lots of talcum powder inside the tyre really helped. I mean lots.
  • Just an update, I have a broken blister on my left thumb, and another on my right thumb. Turns out using a plastic lever made getting the tyre on 10x easier (10x easier than almost impossible is still pretty hard), however my technique wasn't the best, and through trial and error I learned what works best to get the tyre on the rim, but I've broken both my levers :(

    I got both tyres on, but at some point, I punctured my tube with my lever, so I have to replace the tube as well as my levers.

    Which tyre levers would you recommend specifically for getting a tight tyre onto a rim?
  • g00se
    g00se Posts: 2,221
    You shouldn't use normal levers - they tear the tube. but if you have to, use one of these:

    http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/var-tyre-levers-prod27539/
  • lesfirth
    lesfirth Posts: 1,382
    I had the same problem fitting tyres to some new wheels. The rim tapes that came with the wheels were quite thick and stiff. When I replaced them with some thinner tapes from some old wheels the tyres went on a lot easier.
  • flycop2000
    flycop2000 Posts: 55
    Just ordered the tyre lever after reading this topic. Last week whilst on a 90 mile Sportive I got a puncture and then pinched the replacement tube with my tyre lever trying to get the last 4inchs of the tyre over the rim. I had no more tubes and the rain had stared to come down. Two other very nice riders stopped and gave me another tube and even put it on for me making it look so easy!, can't thank these two enough. My tyres are Continental Grand Prix 4 Season on Ultegra 6800 rims, which are incredibly tight fitting.
  • rafletcher
    rafletcher Posts: 1,235
    You shouldn't use normal levers - they tear the tube.

    What utter rubbish :roll: ! Bad technique tears tubes, not tyre levers.

    However I try to not use any levers if possible, just because.
  • g00se
    g00se Posts: 2,221
    You shouldn't use normal levers - they tear the tube.

    What utter rubbish :roll: ! Bad technique tears tubes, not tyre levers.


    Rubbish yourself - it's bad technique to use normal levers to get a tyre onto a rim.
  • Ian78
    Ian78 Posts: 24
    Spray a little bit of GT85 round the outside, works for me.
  • desweller
    desweller Posts: 5,175
    Spray a little bit of GT85 round the outside, works for me.

    I'd use talcum powder or soapy water, it's not always a great idea to use petroleum products on rubber - the results can be a bit unpredictable.
    - - - - - - - - - -
    On Strava.{/url}
  • mikesm08
    mikesm08 Posts: 2
    Does anything think I can fit 25mm clincher to this profile? https://ibb.co/fKD0Xy
  • Vino'sGhost
    Vino'sGhost Posts: 4,129
    Flycop2000 wrote:
    Just ordered the tyre lever after reading this topic. Last week whilst on a 90 mile Sportive I got a puncture and then pinched the replacement tube with my tyre lever trying to get the last 4inchs of the tyre over the rim. I had no more tubes and the rain had stared to come down. Two other very nice riders stopped and gave me another tube and even put it on for me making it look so easy!, can't thank these two enough. My tyres are Continental Grand Prix 4 Season on Ultegra 6800 rims, which are incredibly tight fitting.
    I have some ultegra wheels that are so tight I can’t use them on the road. Confined to turbo duty :(
  • ridgerider
    ridgerider Posts: 2,851
    I start fitting the tyre opposite the valve and make sure that the bead sits in the central part of the rim as you work round the wheel to maximise the 'slack' available to pull the last section over the rim by the valve. Never had to use levers to get a tyre on using this technique.
    Half man, Half bike
  • svetty
    svetty Posts: 1,904
    Ridgerider wrote:
    I start fitting the tyre opposite the valve and make sure that the bead sits in the central part of the rim as you work round the wheel to maximise the 'slack' available to pull the last section over the rim by the valve. Never had to use levers to get a tyre on using this technique.
    This.
    FFS! Harden up and grow a pair :D
  • fullvic
    fullvic Posts: 8
    Can anybody recommend a tyre which is known to be easier to fit. I'm having the same problem. Just received a VAR lever which I'm sure I'll break if this carries on.
  • orlok
    orlok Posts: 89
    There will be always a moment of tailwind.Pinarello F8/10 - Ultegra 8000 Di2 - Carbonspeed C50 UST - Tubeless
  • coops1967
    coops1967 Posts: 99
    You need a Kool Stop Tire bead Jack

    https://www.amazon.com/Kool-Stop-Tire-B ... B001AYML7K


    TF-TL4022-1.jpg

    aLways useful to have anyway, especially if you go tubeless with tricky tyre/rom combinations or decide to try out 'open tubular' clinchers like Challenge which are 'interesting' to fit first time...
  • fullvic
    fullvic Posts: 8
    VAR lever broken. Has anybody experience of Pianni rims be tight to fit tyres.
  • Newby here, go easy on me. I've just had my first 'tight fit experience' with a Schwalbe S-One on my Whyte RD rims, all thanks to an effing pot hole pinch puncture.

    I had to give up roadside, luckily not far from home, I couldnt even get the tyre off at first!!!

    I've managed to get the new tube in and the tyre back on now, had to use levers and a fair bit of elbow grease.

    I have a question, in order to get the tyre on I had to push the bead right into the middle of the rim on both sides. I've been very careful with the tube but i'm still a bit nervous of pinching it again when I inflate. Do I just inflate now and the bead will work itself back to the correct position on the rim or should it be levered back on somehow?

    Probably a daft question, but like I said i'm a newby and trying to avoid buying shares in an inner tube manufacturer! Thanks in advance for your advice!

    Crispy
  • svetty
    svetty Posts: 1,904
    Crispy1981 wrote:
    Newby here, go easy on me. I've just had my first 'tight fit experience' with a Schwalbe S-One on my Whyte RD rims, all thanks to an effing pot hole pinch puncture.

    I had to give up roadside, luckily not far from home, I couldnt even get the tyre off at first!!!

    I've managed to get the new tube in and the tyre back on now, had to use levers and a fair bit of elbow grease.

    I have a question, in order to get the tyre on I had to push the bead right into the middle of the rim on both sides. I've been very careful with the tube but i'm still a bit nervous of pinching it again when I inflate. Do I just inflate now and the bead will work itself back to the correct position on the rim or should it be levered back on somehow?

    Probably a daft question, but like I said i'm a newby and trying to avoid buying shares in an inner tube manufacturer! Thanks in advance for your advice!

    Crispy
    Ridgerider wrote:
    Start fitting the tyre opposite the valve and make sure that the bead sits in the central part of the rim as you work round the wheel to maximise the 'slack' available to pull the last section over the rim by the valve. Never had to use levers to get a tyre on using this technique.

    You really want to avoid using levers to get tyres on. By using the technique outlined above you will (almost) always be able to have enough slack to roll the tyre over the rim at the valve to finish. Make sure both tyre beads are sitting in the well of the rim to create this slack. The beads will be forced into place as you inflate the tyre. I generally over-inflate to about 130 psi the first time to ensure the beads are properly seated. It's worth checking that the tyre is correctly installed all the way around with no high spots, then let some air out to achieve the desired pressure.
    FFS! Harden up and grow a pair :D
  • Svetty wrote:

    You really want to avoid using levers to get tyres on. By using the technique outlined above you will (almost) always be able to have enough slack to roll the tyre over the rim at the valve to finish. Make sure both tyre beads are sitting in the well of the rim to create this slack. The beads will be forced into place as you inflate the tyre. I generally over-inflate to about 130 psi the first time to ensure the beads are properly seated. It's worth checking that the tyre is correctly installed all the way around with no high spots, then let some air out to achieve the desired pressure.

    Cheers for the advice.