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Bike Fit every 2 years ?

Octopus1Octopus1 Posts: 56
edited June 2015 in Road beginners
My last bike fit was a specialized BG in 2011. I ride almost every day, a 14 mile commute and ride several sportives during the year. Both summer bike and winter trainer are set up as close as I can them, although summer bike is more agressive geometry. I'm finding that on longer distances (typically over 60 miles) I get a niggle in the right knee, inside of the knee cap. Whilst this could be as a result of the increase in distance, everything else feels really good. Cleat position is the same as originally outlined , as I've got typex around the outside of the cleat so I can replicate the alignment. It happens every time I go for longer distances although it has been slightly better after raising the saddle 3mm.

I thought about whether it would be worthwhile getting another fit, apparently Specialized advise getting fitted every two years ? Is this right ? Whilst I might of gotten a little fitter and thinner, flexibility is about the same. Is it likely to be worth it or a waste of money.

Which is better the BG fit or using a Retul fitter. I'm looking to replicate the measurements across several bikes ?

Thanks for your help.

Posts

  • gaffer_slowgaffer_slow Posts: 417
    i may be wrong, but somehow i got the impression that BG/Spec bought the Retul system and renamed it.

    If you want to try something else. The Giant Powerfit, is an interesting one that i am going to take over the summer. I don't know if Retul use power, but considering that through my own experimentation i am generally niggle / pain free for 8+ hrs in the saddle - but i would be interested if their is a more efficient position i could use (whilst maintaining the same comfort level) There is also a Shimano system that also uses power.
  • GrillGrill Posts: 5,610
    Spec did buy Retul, but still use the BG fit system in their concept stores. Retul will advise which bikes fit the best given a body position and of course they're all Spec bikes.

    All fit systems suck and are worthless without someone competent doing the fit. Better off doing it yourself with small (a few mm at a time) modifications to saddle height as well as fore/aft.
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • kingrollokingrollo Posts: 3,147
    My last bike fit was a specialized BG in 2011. I ride almost every day, a 14 mile commute and ride several sportives during the year. Both summer bike and winter trainer are set up as close as I can them, although summer bike is more agressive geometry. I'm finding that on longer distances (typically over 60 miles) I get a niggle in the right knee, inside of the knee cap. Whilst this could be as a result of the increase in distance, everything else feels really good. Cleat position is the same as originally outlined , as I've got typex around the outside of the cleat so I can replicate the alignment. It happens every time I go for longer distances although it has been slightly better after raising the saddle 3mm.

    I thought about whether it would be worthwhile getting another fit, apparently Specialized advise getting fitted every two years ? Is this right ? Whilst I might of gotten a little fitter and thinner, flexibility is about the same. Is it likely to be worth it or a waste of money.

    Which is better the BG fit or using a Retul fitter. I'm looking to replicate the measurements across several bikes ?

    Thanks for your help.

    Really ? - a bike fit every two years ? - youve got to be kidding me.

    Do it yourself - you are unlikely to be that far out - and if pain persists I will wager its not a bike fit issue - its either flexibility or an injury...
  • BrandonABrandonA Posts: 553
    Last year one of the Eurosport commentators stated that they have a couple each year. His rationale was that your both changes shape or your fitness/flexibility may change. If this is the case then the bike fit you had done previously is no longer valid.

    Personally, I like to tweak one thing at a time and see how it feels. Tonight I am going to start experimenting with different stem heights as I think I'm now more flexible than I was when I started riding and had my bike fit. No need to pay someone if you do things in a structured way, but I think it is always worth looking into ways that could either make you faster or more comfortable.
  • KajjalKajjal Posts: 3,404
    I recently raised the saddle a little too high causing knee pain. Dropped it back down a bit and back to normal now. For bike fit peoples bodies, flexibility and needs vary but most can get a good enough setup by careful adjustment and a bit of research.
  • Is the pain behind your knee cap I.e. On the inside surface - chondromalacia - or in the joint itself?
  • Octopus1Octopus1 Posts: 56
    Right Knee, left hand side, feels like the joint. I'm going to paly around with the footbeds and the shims I have as it may be done to over-pronation ? I have no problems with the left knee of any other part of my body. Just the knee. I though I would try a 1.5+ varus shim (specialised shoes) and a ++ footbed. That might help.

    I'm not keen on spending more money on a bike fit that I do not need. It seems more like a sales pitch than a genuine answer.
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 20,351
    I had a very similar knee problem to the one you describe and eventually traced it to my cleat set up (Speedplay). Essentially I had set it up so that my toes were a mm too far in so that, on every pedal stroke, my knee was twisting in very slightly as the cleat just nudged up against the edge of the float. On a short ride it was barely noticable but after 100+km it felt like someone was sticking a needle into the back of my knee cap!

    So at first I would just make sure that your cleats are in the right place as even the tiniest rotation could cause you issues.

    With the rest I do sympathise. I had a bike fit and, partly becasue I had come from MTBing, I had my position all sorts of wrong! However, after it was adjusted it felt awful becasue everything was different and bit by bit I just ended up putting everything back to where it was. Over last year I slowly moved everything into the new positions which felt better. During the winter I had another fit and everything was much more subtle but really ironed out a lot of little niggles. So I do think there is a case - especially if you re a new cyclist - for getting a fit re-checked every now and again.
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • Right Knee, left hand side, feels like the joint. I'm going to paly around with the footbeds and the shims I have as it may be done to over-pronation ? I have no problems with the left knee of any other part of my body. Just the knee. I though I would try a 1.5+ varus shim (specialised shoes) and a ++ footbed. That might help.

    I'm not keen on spending more money on a bike fit that I do not need. It seems more like a sales pitch than a genuine answer.

    Over pronation is a relatively common foot problem but what makes you think this? Do you have problems when walking? Do your shoes (non cycling) have a distinct wear pattern?
    ddraver wrote:
    I had a very similar knee problem to the one you describe and eventually traced it to my cleat set up (Speedplay). Essentially I had set it up so that my toes were a mm too far in so that, on every pedal stroke, my knee was twisting in very slightly as the cleat just nudged up against the edge of the float. On a short ride it was barely noticable but after 100+km it felt like someone was sticking a needle into the back of my knee cap.

    Do you mean you had the rear cleat grub screw screwed in too far, I.e. your heel was being prevented from rotating out (away from the frame) as far as it wanted to by the grub screw?
  • blackpoolkevblackpoolkev Posts: 474
    Hmm - So every couple of years you are looking to pay someone to tell you where your saddle and handlebars should be? (There are only three contact points and the pedals are always in the same place)

    Okay so I'm playing Devil's Advocate here but wouldn't a bit of trial and error give you the answers you need. After all it's your body, it will tell you more than some "one size fits all algorithm" .
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 20,351
    ddraver wrote:
    I had a very similar knee problem to the one you describe and eventually traced it to my cleat set up (Speedplay). Essentially I had set it up so that my toes were a mm too far in so that, on every pedal stroke, my knee was twisting in very slightly as the cleat just nudged up against the edge of the float. On a short ride it was barely noticable but after 100+km it felt like someone was sticking a needle into the back of my knee cap.

    Do you mean you had the rear cleat grub screw screwed in too far, I.e. your heel was being prevented from rotating out (away from the frame) as far as it wanted to by the grub screw?

    So my heel couldnt rotate TOWARD the crank arm enough...I think that's the front grub screw isnt it? Same basic problem though
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • ddraver wrote:
    I had a very similar knee problem to the one you describe and eventually traced it to my cleat set up (Speedplay). Essentially I had set it up so that my toes were a mm too far in so that, on every pedal stroke, my knee was twisting in very slightly as the cleat just nudged up against the edge of the float. On a short ride it was barely noticable but after 100+km it felt like someone was sticking a needle into the back of my knee cap.

    Do you mean you had the rear cleat grub screw screwed in too far, I.e. your heel was being prevented from rotating out (away from the frame) as far as it wanted to by the grub screw?

    So my heel couldnt rotate TOWARD the crank arm enough...I think that's the front grub screw isnt it? Same basic problem though

    Cheers
  • I once got a bike-fit. The shop spent a few hours adjusting their jig to get my fit and were happy they had a good set of measurements. Then when they went to adjust my bike, the saddle and bars would have been in impossible places! Their measurements just did not compute onto the actual frame. In my experience it was an exercise in them selling customers a new saddle and some innersole footbeds. I've done 100km a few times and 100 mile with their bodged compromised bike fit but my upper back, shoulders and lower neck still starts to get a bit stiff towards the end.

    Maybe its worth getting a bike-fit before you choose which bike to buy and getting the bike that's the closest match to the geometry. For example, you could not turn a Look 795 into a comfortable tourer. The aggressive stems must only be suited to the most flexible of youthful racers.
    "The Prince of Wales is now the King of France" - Calton Kirby
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