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Where to start

morgan_blakemorgan_blake Posts: 12
edited June 2015 in Road beginners
Hi

This is probably a well trodden path but thought I ask a few questions and hopefully get some friendly advice.

1) 29 yeras old
2) I am a swimmer, I currently swim 5 times a week for between 40mins - 1 hour
3) I like training super duper early (6/6.30am starts are what I prefer)
4) I am going to be training for sportives

I have a bike (A specialised allez) and have been riding it once a week for 1 hour. I can tell I am getting quicker, but I don't feel like I am training. i.e. when I swim, it is very structured. When I ride.. I just ride! Always as hard as I can but my legs usually get tired and I gradually slow down.

Any advice on what to do to improve would be great.

Many Thanks

Morgan

Posts

  • bagz3bagz3 Posts: 253
    For me personally, its just about spending time on the bike, and gradually increasing it.
    One thing i do stand by is varying the intensity of the rides. For instance i like to do a leisurely ride, where im keeping my heart rate low. Then I'll mix it up another day by doing a shorter timed ride, ie 10 mile Time Trial and get that heart rate right up!!

    A typical week for me is 3 rides with at least one TT or chain gang ride with the club, and a leisurely ride.

    Just gradually increase the time on the bike and it'll come naturally.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,003
    No training is needed for sportives, as such. If you want to improve on the bike generally, start by riding it for more than an hour a week..
  • No training is needed for sportives, as such. If you want to improve on the bike generally, start by riding it for more than an hour a week..

    Why is no training required? I thought they looked like a tough challenge?
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,003
    No training is needed for sportives, as such. If you want to improve on the bike generally, start by riding it for more than an hour a week..

    Why is no training required? I thought they looked like a tough challenge?

    I mean there is no specific training needed. The only requirement of a sportive is that you complete the course. Obviously you will need to be able to ride whatever distance the sportive is - but you don't need to train for that - just ride your bike.
  • dj58dj58 Posts: 2,132
    Depending on what distance you plan to ride when you do a sportive, you need to increase your distance and time in the saddle to enable your body to adapt to road cycling. Your swimming fitness will help with your C.V. and your muscle tone, however as you have discovered just going flat for an hour will not get you very far, as you will be using different muscle groups when cycling.

    Learn to pace yourself and use your gears efficiently so that you don't end your ride on empty, gradually increase your distance, try and do more than one ride a week and if you have the time at the weekend go for a longer ride.
  • JayKostaJayKosta Posts: 635
    Serious bike training (as needed to place high even in a sportive) will typically make your thigh muscles larger and heavier - that might not be desirable if your primary sport is competitive swimming.

    If your sportive goal is not competitive, but simply to finish in a reasonable time and have fun, then no particular training is needed besides 'time and distance' in the saddle.
    If the sportive is particularly hilly, then you would need to be prepared for that.

    For many people, the joy of a sportive is meeting and talking with fellow cyclists - not pounding out fast miles for hour after hour....

    Jay Kosta
    Endwell NY USA
  • markhewitt1978markhewitt1978 Posts: 7,614
    The main advice is that if you're going to be doing a sportive even at a slow space then one hour a week is going to do nothing for you no matter how hard you're going for that hour.

    You need to increase either the duration of your weekend rides or ride more often; preferably both.

    For more structure then sign up to Strava so you can track your progress on segments. Also look into the likes of a Garmin so you can see your heart rate.
  • jgsijgsi Posts: 5,026
    For most.. riding a bike full gas every flippin' ride is not what they do... or want.
    Just enjoy it and read around the subject of competitive riding/training at your leisure.
  • For most.. riding a bike full gas every flippin' ride is not what they do... or want.
    Just enjoy it and read around the subject of competitive riding/training at your leisure.

    I enjoy going fast (well.. as fast as I can!)

    One thing I don't understand (and I mean this nicely!), is how some people seem very very slow. I am by no means quick, but when out riding, I rarely get over taken and often go past people like they are standing still. I rode along side someone for a chat the other week, and going at that pace, I would compare it to a light walk... Is this how most people ride bikes? Maybe its my mentality, but when I get on a bike, I feel like my legs should be hurting. Maybe that's just because I am used to the hurty feeling from swimming?
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,003
    Maybe you are just more awesome than the other riders you meet...
  • Maybe you are just more awesome than the other riders you meet...

    There is always someone more awesome than yourself. Don't hate the player. Ill be the first to admit there are a million and one people who could blast past me. It was a valid and honest question.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,003
    Maybe you are just more awesome than the other riders you meet...

    There is always someone more awesome than yourself. Don't hate the player. Ill be the first to admit there are a million and one people who could blast past me. It was a valid and honest question.

    what was the question?
  • Simon MastersonSimon Masterson Posts: 2,740
    For most.. riding a bike full gas every flippin' ride is not what they do... or want.
    Just enjoy it and read around the subject of competitive riding/training at your leisure.

    I enjoy going fast (well.. as fast as I can!)

    One thing I don't understand (and I mean this nicely!), is how some people seem very very slow. I am by no means quick, but when out riding, I rarely get over taken and often go past people like they are standing still. I rode along side someone for a chat the other week, and going at that pace, I would compare it to a light walk... Is this how most people ride bikes? Maybe its my mentality, but when I get on a bike, I feel like my legs should be hurting. Maybe that's just because I am used to the hurty feeling from swimming?

    This is a pretty normal experience for people in good shape that get into cycling - it feels fast, and you probably will/have made some gains quite quickly.

    As for how to train, similar principles to what I'm guessing you do in the pool (maybe you do go flat out 100% of the time, I don't know!) - structured training, lots of time at medium intensity, recover properly. That said, nothing wrong with really going for it to begin with, you need to get accustomed.
  • ForumNewbieForumNewbie Posts: 1,664
    For most.. riding a bike full gas every flippin' ride is not what they do... or want.
    Just enjoy it and read around the subject of competitive riding/training at your leisure.

    I enjoy going fast (well.. as fast as I can!)

    One thing I don't understand (and I mean this nicely!), is how some people seem very very slow. I am by no means quick, but when out riding, I rarely get over taken and often go past people like they are standing still. I rode along side someone for a chat the other week, and going at that pace, I would compare it to a light walk... Is this how most people ride bikes? Maybe its my mentality, but when I get on a bike, I feel like my legs should be hurting. Maybe that's just because I am used to the hurty feeling from swimming?
    Maybe people you pass are out for a 3 or 4 hour ride, and you are blasting round for only an hour. I'm nearly double your age, and not fast or very fit, but I can still go reasonably fast for an hour if I put my mind to it. However most times when I'm out riding you would probably blast past me, but I am certainly not going at a light walk pace unless maybe I'm crawling up a particularly steep climb.
  • JayKostaJayKosta Posts: 635
    ...
    One thing I don't understand (and I mean this nicely!), is how some people seem very very slow.
    ...

    We all generally try to do 'the best we can' for what 'we want to accomplish'.
    Different strokes for different folks.....

    Jay Kosta
    Endwell NY USA
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    I on the other hand seem to spend a lot of time being overtaken. Perhaps we've met, briefly? Try as I might, I can't get my average speed up to 15mph; it's the reason I've given up on sportives, it's so demoralising spending several hours being overtaken, sometimes by fat buggers on mountain bikes and who go on to clean out the feed stops before I reach them. And approaching 58 years old, I doubt I'm going to suddenly come into form any time soon.

    So some of us are just slower, OK?
  • PTestTeamPTestTeam Posts: 395
    Hi

    This is probably a well trodden path but thought I ask a few questions and hopefully get some friendly advice.

    1) 29 yeras old
    2) I am a swimmer, I currently swim 5 times a week for between 40mins - 1 hour
    3) I like training super duper early (6/6.30am starts are what I prefer)
    4) I am going to be training for sportives

    I have a bike (A specialised allez) and have been riding it once a week for 1 hour. I can tell I am getting quicker, but I don't feel like I am training. i.e. when I swim, it is very structured. When I ride.. I just ride! Always as hard as I can but my legs usually get tired and I gradually slow down.

    Any advice on what to do to improve would be great.

    Many Thanks

    Morgan

    This all depends on what goals you have?
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