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Best GPS for mapping

rubertoerubertoe Posts: 3,994
edited June 2015 in Commuting chat
As per the title really.

I have been looking at some touring and want a GPS computer that has maps (a bit like the sat nav in my car). I am not interested in HR, Cadence or power, I just want to ride my bike and not get lost.

I have been looking at the Edge Touring which is essentially an 800/10 lite without the the training data stuff ( I currently use a 200) but have read mixed reviews.

What else should I consider (eTrex)?

Edited to add: I am a complete idiot when it comes to computers and files so it needs to be 5 year old child simple.
"If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always got."

PX Kaffenback 2 = Work Horse
B-Twin Alur 700 = Sundays and Hills

Posts

  • imatfaalimatfaal Posts: 2,716
    I found that until I added better maps (which is not a task for a 5-y-o) that my Garmin800 was very poor for following a route in unknown territory. But you can either buy or download better maps which are routable - I used the guide here to both navigate and get the maps in the first place

    http://www.scarletfire.co.uk/foolproof- ... -edge-800/

    But then I bought the thing in order to measure cadence, heart rate etc. so route-following was secondary. Now that I have it sorted out I can download a GPX file and follow it fairly easily. I still carry an old fashioned paper OS map tho.
  • deswellerdesweller Posts: 5,271
    Paper map if simple is your #1 criterium.

    The eTrex takes a bit of getting used to. Some of the features (the behaviour of the routing algorithm, for example) vary depending on what maps are loaded. I don't know what the Edge Touring is like.
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  • davisdavis Posts: 2,566
    Names of towns/villages taped to your stem? Improves your sense of direction no end.

    I'm not even really joking.
    Sometimes parts break. Sometimes you crash. Sometimes it’s your fault.
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 8,195
    I currently use the edge touring which works for me, gives the usual speed , time etc but also what road your on, used it a few times to follow present routes with no issues but tend to use it just to log riding times and distance tbh.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • mudcoveredmudcovered Posts: 725
    Only used it s few times but my Edge810 loaded with the openstreetmap routable maps seems to work well. The route prompts pop up nicely even if you have it in non-mapping display mode and it seemed to chose sensible enough routes to the destinations.

    Mike
  • freezing77freezing77 Posts: 731
    I think that you should very much consider one of the etrex series such as the 20 or 30.

    You will need to provide your own maps but they use standard AA batteries and are simple to use.

    They automatically log rides, no need to start/stop timers and reset the device to save a ride.
  • I've had a Bryton Rider 50 for a couple of years and it does the job. Comes with decent enough maps and the routing software (i.e. navigate me to this place, rather than follow this route) works well enough. It was cheaper than any equivalent Garmin at the time so I imagine it still is.
    FCN 7
    Porridge and coffee - the breakfast of champions
  • rubertoerubertoe Posts: 3,994
    £300 is a bit steep for a cycling gadget.

    Edge touring and a paper map can be had for less than £150
    "If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always got."

    PX Kaffenback 2 = Work Horse
    B-Twin Alur 700 = Sundays and Hills
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    I have the Edge Touring Plus (I like to see / record HR out of curiosity). Liked the fact it came with Open Streetmap of Europe pre-installed, and that it updates itself regularly if with glacial slowness. (3 hours to update a map?? WTF??)

    Most of the time I just use it to record my rides, if I remember to hit the start button. Occasionally I'll use it's round trip routing function, ie tell it I want to do 50 miles and it will suggest 3 circular routes. I can preview them on the map to see where it's taking me, and check their elevation profiles, then choose one and hit Ride. I have discovered a lot of great routes this way; quiet roads I've never been down before despite their proximity to home.

    It's generally reliable, although occasionally it tries to take me down a footpath.
    (this must be a Garmin thing; I've checked Open Streetmap on line and the path is invariably tagged correctly as not suitable for cycling)

    Turn off the recalculate function though. If it loses satellite reception or you stray off course on the first part of the ride it recalculates not back onto the course, but instead to your destination via the shortest route which is generally back the way you came. Did that 3 times before I worked out what it was doing.

    It's very reliable at following a pre planned route, giving you beeps and clear turn by turn instructions at junctions, so in that sense it's the closest thing to a car sat nav for a bike (smart phones aside)
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 12,649
    Tell your Garmin that you will be in a car (I can't remember the setting) and it will stick to roads avoiding paths.
    You also tell it to avoid highways.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • freezing77freezing77 Posts: 731
    Tell your Garmin that you will be in a car (I can't remember the setting) and it will stick to roads avoiding paths.
    You also tell it to avoid highways.

    Comes under routing options on the 800, the choices are bicycle , car/motorbike, pedestrian. There are several other routing options which are worth fine tuning.
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    Tell your Garmin that you will be in a car (I can't remember the setting) and it will stick to roads avoiding paths.
    You also tell it to avoid highways.

    Comes under routing options on the 800, the choices are bicycle , car/motorbike, pedestrian. There are several other routing options which are worth fine tuning.

    I'm not sure the Touring has that option, but I'll have another look tonight...
  • freezing77freezing77 Posts: 731
    On the touring it is under profile settings IIRC
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,686
    I'm yet to find a Garmin edge with maps of any use other than as a reminder of places you sort of know, I have my phone and gmaps for the uk or offline maps for EU & USA
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 12,649
    I'm yet to find a Garmin edge with maps of any use other than as a reminder of places you sort of know, I have my phone and gmaps for the uk or offline maps for EU & USA
    Check your settings or route options.
    My 705 gives perfect turn by turn directions in the UK, France and Mallorca.
    I did buy the bundle with official Europe maps which may make a difference.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,686
    Nah I have the maps and in fact a 705 but its still censored compared with a phone

    Having just sold my garmin 200 my 705 is now on commuting duties pending replacement full time by my Samsung s5 or the leyzne head unit
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    On the touring it is under profile settings IIRC

    Nope, no way of convincing the Touring that you're a car :cry:
  • roger_merrimanroger_merriman Posts: 6,147
    As per the title really.

    I have been looking at some touring and want a GPS computer that has maps (a bit like the sat nav in my car). I am not interested in HR, Cadence or power, I just want to ride my bike and not get lost.

    I have been looking at the Edge Touring which is essentially an 800/10 lite without the the training data stuff ( I currently use a 200) but have read mixed reviews.

    What else should I consider (eTrex)?

    Edited to add: I am a complete idiot when it comes to computers and files so it needs to be 5 year old child simple.

    if you know the routes you'll be taking the 200 will handle that, you can follow routes, it's not great for MTBing or urban, but it's fine for roads and lanes and such.
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