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cadence device

lmcamoeslmcamoes Posts: 51
edited July 2015 in Road buying advice
Hi,

I am looking for a simple device that shows me my cadence, nothing fancy and expensive.

What do you suggest?

Posts

  • ai_1ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    lmcamoes wrote:
    Hi,

    I am looking for a simple device that shows me my cadence, nothing fancy and expensive.

    What do you suggest?
    Depends how unfancy and inexpensive you want to go.
    A watch will do it. Just count your pedal strokes for a timed period and you know your cadence.
    If you want a live RPM read-out then get a cheap wired bike computer that includes cadence. I'm sure they all work fine.
  • Zerotails99Zerotails99 Posts: 127
    Cateye wireless sensors are very good for the money. You will only need to use it for a couple of rides before you can tell what cadence you're doing without looking. It's not something you will need to use for long.
  • ai_1ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    Cateye wireless sensors are very good for the money. You will only need to use it for a couple of rides before you can tell what cadence you're doing without looking. It's not something you will need to use for long.
    The value of a cadence sensor is definitely highest when you start using it but I don't think they then outlive their usefulness. I've been using one for years and I still use it constantly.
  • lmcamoeslmcamoes Posts: 51
    I found that the Cateye Strada Cadence Computer is the kind of device that I am looking for, shows on a display the RPM and it is around £31

    Do you know any other similar device for a lower price?
  • cgfw201cgfw201 Posts: 669
    i bought one of the cheaper ones from Cateye and after a couple of weeks got frustrated with it's limitations and got a garmin 500...more expensive but likely a better long term option.
  • lmcamoeslmcamoes Posts: 51
    I know that is limited in its functions but I can't spend much more money on my bike, misses will kill me if I do.
    I am looking for something around £20/£25
  • chris_basschris_bass Posts: 4,913
    think you might struggle for that price, maybe just bend the front mech cable out a bit and count the clicks?
    www.conjunctivitis.com - a site for sore eyes
  • simon_mastersonsimon_masterson Posts: 2,740
    I have a Sigma BC16.12 wireless computer on one of my bikes. In all honesty, whilst I find/have found it significantly more irritating than a wired computer, the cadence sensor in the main has been fine; it's the front wheel sensor I've had trouble with. It cost me a little more than your stated budget, but it's a decent piece of kit.
  • diydiy Posts: 6,473
    lmcamoes wrote:
    I know that is limited in its functions but I can't spend much more money on my bike, misses will kill me if I do.
    I am looking for something around £20/£25

    Buy the garmin - hide the credit card bill and receipt.
    or
    when she moans say firmly "be quiet woman" and not expect sex for a while.

    sorted.
  • lmcamoeslmcamoes Posts: 51
    No sex for a while? I think that will be to much to bare!
  • lmcamoeslmcamoes Posts: 51
    diy wrote:
    sorry - I assumed you were married. :D


    I am but the idea of no sex for a while doesn't appeal to me... I prefer not upset her that much :roll:
  • jamin100jamin100 Posts: 72
    btwin count 14 from decathlon have cadence and are about £25
  • bob6397bob6397 Posts: 218
    Whatever you get, getting one with a wireless sensor will make your life much easier..

    I used a Cateye Strada Wireless (non cadence) on my bike before I got my Garmin eTrex and that was awesome - 6 month battery life (at least!) and an awful lot easier than a wired one to install and a lot less ugly.. :)
    Boardman HT Team - Hardtail
    Rose Pro-SL 2000 - Roadie
  • lmcamoeslmcamoes Posts: 51
    jamin100 wrote:
    btwin count 14 from decathlon have cadence and are about £25

    not any longer on sale :(
  • simon_mastersonsimon_masterson Posts: 2,740
    bob6397 wrote:
    Whatever you get, getting one with a wireless sensor will make your life much easier...

    I would have to disagree - I'm not even sure that the installation was that much less fiddly with the wireless computer vs wired. As mentioned in my post above, I have had far more trouble getting wireless computers to work than wired - I don't remember having had any trouble at all from my Sigma BC1009...
  • bob6397bob6397 Posts: 218
    bob6397 wrote:
    Whatever you get, getting one with a wireless sensor will make your life much easier...

    I would have to disagree - I'm not even sure that the installation was that much less fiddly with the wireless computer vs wired. As mentioned in my post above, I have had far more trouble getting wireless computers to work than wired - I don't remember having had any trouble at all from my Sigma BC1009...


    Well fair enough.. but all the wireless ones I have used (about 5 of them on different bikes for different people) have just worked out of the box - they were all cateye ones though so I have no experience with other brands..
    Boardman HT Team - Hardtail
    Rose Pro-SL 2000 - Roadie
  • flowrateflowrate Posts: 15
    I saw this on Youtube.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qrL476g662I

    Make sure you have a wired computer as the wireless ones can not pick up the sensor as when I tried to convert my wireless cycle computer sensor was too far away to read,

    Or try ebay. Plenty of boardman's that have this function for around £20
  • lmcamoeslmcamoes Posts: 51
    Now tthat I have my cadence device what RPM should I aim for?
  • ai_1ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    Now tthat I have my cadence device what RPM should I aim for?
    Depends!

    First I'd just use it for observation for a few rides and see what you've been doing to date.
    Most people would agree that a cadence anywhere from 80-100 is normal and can suit a given rider. If you're riding with a much lower cadence say 60-75 most of the time then it may be worth using the cadence meter monitor yourself and keep your cadence higher for a few rides until it becomes natural, then you can decide if you find it better or not.
    If you have a low cadence and are trying to train yourself to maintain a higher cadence, I think 90-95 is a good target initially.
  • lmcamoeslmcamoes Posts: 51
    At the moment what I manage to do is around 80... When I go bellow 80 and change to a low gear to increase cadence and when I am above 85, close to 90 I change to a higher gear.
    Should I aim to be around 90 instead of the 80?
  • ai_1ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    At the moment what I manage to do is around 80... When I go bellow 80 and change to a low gear to increase cadence and when I am above 85, close to 90 I change to a higher gear.
    Should I aim to be around 90 instead of the 80?
    I don't think there's a "correct" answer.
    You could certainly try it and see which you find works best for you.
    When I started riding I had a tendency to ride in too big a gear (i.e. too low a cadence) so that my legs fatigued quite quickly without my ever being particularly taxed in terms of high heart rate or heavy breathing. I started keeping an eye on my cadence and I tended to keep it around 95rpm when I was paying attention. This became natural to me and I stopped worrying about cadence. Now my cadence varies a bit depending on what I'm doing and how I'm feeling. I now ride on feel in terms of cadence but occasionally I'll glance at the cadence figure and think, "maybe I'll raise that a little" a bit or "that seems appropriate".
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