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Heart Rate and Hard Efforts - Newbie question

speedjunkiespeedjunkie Posts: 69
edited May 2015 in Road beginners
Lets suposse we´re doing a Hard Effort 90% - 95% Max HeartRate for 10, 20m, and we let the engine cool off and drop to 60% MHeartRate and then we have to dig deep again for another hard effort. of 90%-95%. It is preferable not completly cool off and keep the HR at 75% to 80% so the "engine" is ready for going high revs or makes no difference.

Im asking because when i take brakes with a sudden hrate drop, is damm painfull to enter in "Racing mode again" while if i mantain the Heart artificially at a slighty higher HR seems more easy.

Am i making any sense ?

Also i finally entered on some high censored fast group rides, averaging 23-25 on flats, due the wind shielding of group effect im prone to take quick breaks and stop pedelling for 1 2, 3 seconds, and i notice some experience riders keep pedalling almost ever, besides going downhill. Whats the advantage of this ?

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  • ai_1ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    Lets suposse we´re doing a Hard Effort 90% - 95% Max HeartRate for 10, 20m, and we let the engine cool off and drop to 60% MHeartRate and then we have to dig deep again for another hard effort. of 90%-95%. It is preferable not completly cool off and keep the HR at 75% to 80% so the "engine" is ready for going high revs or makes no difference....
    I doubt you're holding 90-95% for 10 or 20 minutes. If it's 10 or 20 meters that's reasonable!
    It can be difficult to crank up the power levels after a rest but if you've been at a high enough level for a while you may need the rest? Some people are good at changing speeds (surges and lulls) others are good at constant even efforts (like TT style riding).
    ...Also i finally entered on some high ******* fast group rides, averaging 23-25 on flats, due the wind shielding of group effect im prone to take quick breaks and stop pedelling for 1 2, 3 seconds, and i notice some experience riders keep pedalling almost ever, besides going downhill. Whats the advantage of this ?
    Generally speaking it's more effective to pedal constantly at a lower effort than to pedal harder and take breaks. Also the later will cause changes in speed which though minor may cause some difficulty in a group with those behind you having to reduce speed unexpectedly due to a closing gap to your back wheel.
    Also, even if you're cycling solo, you'll probably find that taking breaks and resting your legs after hard efforts can cause them to become stiff and occasionally prone to cramps. Keeping them moving helps maintain circulation and helps clear lactate etc from your muscles and bloodstream even if you're not doing much work. I pedal almost constantly, even on descents where I could freewheel at 50km/h. Once it gets above that I'll often stop pedaling because I'd need to put in a proper effort to contribute anything or because I want to get a more aero or a more stable position.
  • speedjunkiespeedjunkie Posts: 69
    ai_1 wrote:
    Lets suposse we´re doing a Hard Effort 90% - 95% Max HeartRate for 10, 20m, and we let the engine cool off and drop to 60% MHeartRate and then we have to dig deep again for another hard effort. of 90%-95%. It is preferable not completly cool off and keep the HR at 75% to 80% so the "engine" is ready for going high revs or makes no difference....
    I doubt you're holding 90-95% for 10 or 20 minutes. If it's 10 or 20 meters that's reasonable!
    It can be difficult to crank up the power levels after a rest but if you've been at a high enough level for a while you may need the rest? Some people are good at changing speeds (surges and lulls) others are good at constant even efforts (like TT style riding).
    ...Also i finally entered on some high ******* fast group rides, averaging 23-25 on flats, due the wind shielding of group effect im prone to take quick breaks and stop pedelling for 1 2, 3 seconds, and i notice some experience riders keep pedalling almost ever, besides going downhill. Whats the advantage of this ?
    Generally speaking it's more effective to pedal constantly at a lower effort than to pedal harder and take breaks. Also the later will cause changes in speed which though minor may cause some difficulty in a group with those behind you having to reduce speed unexpectedly due to a closing gap to your back wheel.
    Also, even if you're cycling solo, you'll probably find that taking breaks and resting your legs after hard efforts can cause them to become stiff and occasionally prone to cramps. Keeping them moving helps maintain circulation and helps clear lactate etc from your muscles and bloodstream even if you're not doing much work. I pedal almost constantly, even on descents where I could freewheel at 50km/h. Once it gets above that I'll often stop pedaling because I'd need to put in a proper effort to contribute anything or because I want to get a more aero or a more stable position.

    On a big climb, going all out, had more than one time hit 180-3avg bpm for 20m and my MHR is 191.

    I dont do this climb often. Thank god , its damm painfull. lol

    On group riding without huge climbs avoiding going to red line, maybe 3,4m at 170bpm 180bpm, when the group accelarates big time, with averages around 160bpm for long efforts.

    Going to use that constant pedaling tip ! Thanks!
  • ai_1ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    If that is 180-183bpm for up to 20 mins then I doubt your MHR is 191. I'd say it's at least 200. I may be wrong!
    For comparison my MHR is in the low 190s and I only really get over 180 in a sprint, doing short high intensity intervals, or pushing very hard towards the end of a steep climb or TT when I know I'm nearly finished for the day. I could sustain 180bpm for a couple of minutes at most.

    P.S.
    m = meters
    mins = minutes
    miles = miles
    Using m for minutes or miles is VERY confusing.
  • speedjunkiespeedjunkie Posts: 69
    ai_1 wrote:
    If that is 180-183bpm for up to 20 mins then I doubt your MHR is 191. I'd say it's at least 200. I may be wrong!
    For comparison my MHR is in the low 190s and I only really get over 180 in a sprint, doing short high intensity intervals, or pushing very hard towards the end of a steep climb or TT when I know I'm nearly finished for the day. I could sustain 180bpm for a couple of minutes at most.

    P.S.
    m = meters
    mins = minutes
    miles = miles
    Using m for minutes or miles is VERY confusing.

    Max i ever recorded was 191, and i hit it like a handfull of times, never going any further than 191. Maybe i never truly tested myself.

    From feeling alone , seems im going anaerobic around 178-180 i start to feel the "system is shutting down" warning.
  • ai_1ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    ai_1 wrote:
    If that is 180-183bpm for up to 20 mins then I doubt your MHR is 191. I'd say it's at least 200. I may be wrong!
    For comparison my MHR is in the low 190s and I only really get over 180 in a sprint, doing short high intensity intervals, or pushing very hard towards the end of a steep climb or TT when I know I'm nearly finished for the day. I could sustain 180bpm for a couple of minutes at most.

    P.S.
    m = meters
    mins = minutes
    miles = miles
    Using m for minutes or miles is VERY confusing.

    Max i ever recorded was 191, and i hit it like a handfull of times, never going any further than 191. Maybe i never truly tested myself.

    From feeling alone , seems im going anaerobic around 178-180 i start to feel the "system is shutting down" warning.
    Actual max is probably higher than you've ever seen in training unless you went out with the express intention of reaching it. I think the suggested method to do so is to find a long gradual hill and cycle up it at a fairly hard pace initially, increasing that pace in steps until at a certain point you go all out to exhaustion. You'll find the protocol described in proper detail here somewhere if you hunt around. Once you've hit your actual MHR you'll probably need to fall off the bike and lie on the side of the road to recover for a while before going anywhere. It'll hurt. It's also probably not advisable to do this if you're in any doubt about your cardiac health!
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