Forum home Commuter cycling forum Commuting general

Mismatching tyres

MattPillingerMattPillinger Posts: 82
edited May 2015 in Commuting general
I've always been fortunate that I have been able to replace both tyres at the same time (I usually swap front with back after 1500 miles or so as the back wears down quicker).

However, just had to replace the front only as it split - back has a few hundred more miles in it yet.

I bought replacement front and rear, but only fitted the front at the moment, so my tyres make, tred etc are different front and back

Is this allowable under the rules, does everyone who passes me (there are a lot) think what a tool?

BTW - Couldn't find the same model replacement as the back one I currently have and TBH I wasn't that impressed with them anyway, so wanted to change brands anyway

Posts

  • davisdavis Posts: 2,566
    Who gives a hoot what other people think?
    Sometimes parts break. Sometimes you crash. Sometimes it’s your fault.
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 8,868
    Anything is allowed except for solid tyres, put what you want on if your moving they can't tell anyway.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • Man Of LardMan Of Lard Posts: 903
    I've always been fortunate...

    Conversely - I've always been of the opinion that you replace things as they wear out and don't make extra work for yourself in the process. So consequently I burn through rear tyres like they're going out of fashion - probably 3 or 4 to every front on average and I certainly can't be ar-er-bothered to take the front one off to put it on the back to even the wear.

    When it comes to mixing tyres - sure - why not? As long as you don't mix them on the same axle :)
  • InitialisedInitialised Posts: 3,047
    Try running a wider tyre art the back and a narrow tyre at the front, it's liberating!
    I used to just ride my bike to work but now I find myself going out looking for bigger and bigger hills.
  • RutlandGavRutlandGav Posts: 144
    Try running a wider tyre art the back and a narrow tyre at the front, it's liberating!

    On a MTB, you've got near twice the weight on the rear as the front.

    What's the effect on the handling of what you describe however? I mean, if the front end slips, you're in a road rash situation before you can possibly react. The back end letting go might give you a split second to countersteer or brace for the inevitable highside?
  • slowbikeslowbike Posts: 8,498
    I've always been fortunate that I have been able to replace both tyres at the same time (I usually swap front with back after 1500 miles or so as the back wears down quicker).

    I was talking to my brother (long time club rider) about this a couple of years ago ... he suggested that perhaps I'd like to get a new front tyre and put the old front on the rear once the rear has worn down - on the basis that you don't really want to get a flat in the front - so it should be the "best" tyre - the rear doesn't matter so much.
  • slowbike wrote:
    I've always been fortunate that I have been able to replace both tyres at the same time (I usually swap front with back after 1500 miles or so as the back wears down quicker).

    I was talking to my brother (long time club rider) about this a couple of years ago ... he suggested that perhaps I'd like to get a new front tyre and put the old front on the rear once the rear has worn down - on the basis that you don't really want to get a flat in the front - so it should be the "best" tyre - the rear doesn't matter so much.

    Interesting, did he say why?

    I'd usually err towards putting my 'best' tyre on the back, on the basis that if I get a slow puncture it is generally easier to get home and fix it in the warm etc if it's a front one - because there is a lot less weight on the front and you can also sit back and reduce weight still further.
  • graeme_s-2graeme_s-2 Posts: 3,382
    Interesting, did he say why?
    Because sudden and rapid deflation of your front tyre is more likely to result in you picking your teeth out of the gutter!

    http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-rotation.html
Sign In or Register to comment.