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finding fitting which new tubular tyre

nik_cnik_c Posts: 61
edited July 2015 in Workshop
Hello,

So I finally brought over my 40 year old Falcon to the UK whcih I rode when I was 10. Nice 10-gear.

Only issue I have at the moment is that so far I never really had to take care of such a cool vintage bike and this one needs a new set of tubular tyres. It runs on Campagnolo Lambda Strada rims. I can find a description here: http://www.velobase.com/ViewComponent.a ... e&Enum=107 and I found the tyre I want to fit onto it: http://www.wiggle.co.uk/continental-spr ... ular-tyre/

Is that a possible combo? I see that the rim (outer) width is given as 20mm, but that seems not to be an option on the tyres? Can I fit the 'Black 28x22' option? Or do I have to look any further?

My second question would be whether to use glue or tape to fix the tyres to the rim? I presume glue - even though it is more messy - is the better more sturdy alternative?

Your advice will be very much appreciated - I am a newbie to Road racer bikes, having riden my MTB for the last 10 years (and not much before then and after the age of 12 ;). Additionally, I wold love to keep my Falcon as origianl as possible and not let it 'descend' into a state of mish-mash of 'so-so' parts ;)

Thank you!

Nik C

Posts

  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    No idea about which tubs but reference tape/glue: I'venever had any issues with tape and neither has anyone else I know.

    If it wasn't as secure as possible, all based on user use, they wouldn't sell it.

    If you want to use glue, use glue. Tape if you want to tape. Do either properly and it will be fine.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • fleshtuxedofleshtuxedo Posts: 1,823
    Those tubs will fit perfectly on your rims, as will any 700c tubs except possibly some cross tyres. The 28 in the description just means they are 700c diameter.

    For your build have you considered the cheaper Vittoria Rallys? Tan sidewalls so more vintage looking.

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/vittoria-rally-tubular-tyre/

    Glue is more secure but messier, tape is fine too.
  • sungodsungod Posts: 13,205
    glue shouldn't be messy, it's technique that counts, apply with care and it'll be neat

    with conti tyres, put them on the rims dry first to practice and get a feel for the force needed to mount them

    degrease rims carefully, if there's ancient glue on them i'd get it all off first and lay down a couple of thin coats

    glue: vittoria mastik one, especially on campag rims

    had you considered some retro looking gumwall tubs rather than contis?
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • nik_cnik_c Posts: 61
    thanks all for your great feedback - what a palaver it is to get my old racer back on the road ;) But I like the bike, and am only now realizing what a little gem it is.
    I did buy the contis after all for now, for two reasons: 1) they were immediately available / in stock, 2) they seem to have an ever so slightly thicker thread layer on them which (maybe wrongly) I am thinking will prevent any punctures that little better as well as providing an ever so slightly more 'comfy' ride. I am riding on roads here that are not that great, with if not potholes, then at least some substantial unevenesses and holes in tarmac layers and any bit of added padding is appreciated by my wrists and other asorted bones...
  • JayKostaJayKosta Posts: 635
    Definitely 'dry fit' the tubs onto a rim, inflate to full pressure, and leave it set for at least an hour.
    If the new tire seems 'impossibly tight' to get on the rim, then stop before you damage it.
    It's been easy for me to damage the valve stem by fighting with a tight tub.
    I start at the valve stem and then proceed simultaneously in both right and left direction.

    What has worked for me is to inflate the tire OFF the rim and then soak it in water to help stretch the cloth base tape. Dry off the tire a minute or so after the tape has been wet, and leave the tub inflated for a bit. Then try again to 'dry fit' and inflate the tire on the rim.

    Trying to mount an overly tight tire with glue (and probably tape) is a horrible experience.....

    Jay Kosta
    Endwell NY USA
  • nik_cnik_c Posts: 61
    Thanks Jay for your advice!
    I am still waiting for the new tires to arrive, but from what I am seeing on the internet and hearing on here - I am NOT looking forward to fitting them.

    I am usually good with stuff like this (i.e. things I need my hands for) so am not worried I get it done, but it's really "cycling" I am 'friends with' here not spending endless hours getting my bike ready ;)
  • CYCLESPORT1CYCLESPORT1 Posts: 471
    Just get it done !
    It won't be as bad as a 15 year old schoolboy trying to fit Barum PBWs on using glue in the 70s !
  • nik_cnik_c Posts: 61
    Haha, - sure I will ;)
    no worries about that ...
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    nik_c wrote:
    Thanks Jay for your advice!
    I am still waiting for the new tires to arrive, but from what I am seeing on the internet and hearing on here - I am NOT looking forward to fitting them.

    I am usually good with stuff like this (i.e. things I need my hands for) so am not worried I get it done, but it's really "cycling" I am 'friends with' here not spending endless hours getting my bike ready ;)


    Tish tosh - its another cycling myth. Its simple.

    They aren't difficult t fit - especially with tape - should take you 5 minutes r so.

    Pop on tape, leave tail hanging over the edge of the wheel.

    Valve in valve hole on wheel, roll over the rest of the tub using your fingers. Have a squiz so its central.

    Then two options - pull up tub with one hand, undo tape backing with other. Proceed until whole tub is done or pop a pencil/pen under the tub and unpeel tape as you roll then pen/pencil around.

    Whack some more air in, make sure tub is central.

    When central, inflate fully.

    Jobs a fish. Its a tyre not the space shuttle ............ No worse than fitting a tight new clincher.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • nik_cnik_c Posts: 61
    sounds better and easier with every post ;)

    thank you guys!
  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,496
    No idea about which tubs but reference tape/glue: I'venever had any issues with tape and neither has anyone else I know.

    If it wasn't as secure as possible, all based on user use, they wouldn't sell it.

    If you want to use glue, use glue. Tape if you want to tape. Do either properly and it will be fine.

    +1 I've never had problems with tape.
  • RDB66RDB66 Posts: 492
    ++1 more for tape...never had any problems. You can even use a Tub without tape as a "get you home" its fine, just dont take corners like a nutter !

    One little tip....Leave a 2" gap in the tape opposite the valve. Makes it alot easier to get the Tub off if you need a lever.

    R.
    A Brother of the Wheel. http://www.boxfordbikeclub.co.uk

    09 Canyon Ultimate CF for the Road.
    2011 Carbon Spesh Stumpy FSR.
  • nik_cnik_c Posts: 61
    Little report back about how I got on with my tubular tyres.
    Well, I picked up the fitting pretty quick.

    I have had to. Not sure what it is but they don't last very long these tubular tyres. The roads I am cycling on are not particularly bad or bumpy, or full of potholes but I have yet to make a Continental Giro last longer than 200km. I went through 4 of them so far. I have switched to them becaus ethey are the cheapest. And that is still expensive for me as I need 1 tube of cement for about £4 and the tyre at about £16, plus the time it takes to fit them. This is usually a good few days taking into account the ordering of parts, removing of the old one and the gluing, drying, etc.

    So all in all, tubulars work well when they actually on the bike. Nothing wrong there, but I will be switching to clicnhers at the earliest as they are simply not time and espcially financially efficient for me.
  • earthearth Posts: 934
    Slightly off topic question but if the bike was from 40 years ago when you were 10, I guess you are in your 50s now. Isn't the bike a bit small for you now?
  • nik_cnik_c Posts: 61
    haha - good question ;)
    it was hugely too big and took me a few years to grow into. I am 46 now ...
    oh, and it was my Dads bike who rode it for the first few yeasr of its live!
  • buddy_clubbuddy_club Posts: 935
    Those tubs will fit perfectly on your rims, as will any 700c tubs except possibly some cross tyres. The 28 in the description just means they are 700c diameter.

    For your build have you considered the cheaper Vittoria Rallys? Tan sidewalls so more vintage looking.

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/vittoria-rally-tubular-tyre/

    Glue is more secure but messier, tape is fine too.
    Use these on my retro roadie - great tyres never had a puncture. Use conti glue which again is absolutely fine.
    Framebuilder
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  • nik_cnik_c Posts: 61
    great -thanks.
    a few pounds saved for next time!!
  • sungodsungod Posts: 13,205
    Little report back about how I got on with my tubular tyres.
    Well, I picked up the fitting pretty quick.

    I have had to. Not sure what it is but they don't last very long these tubular tyres. The roads I am cycling on are not particularly bad or bumpy, or full of potholes but I have yet to make a Continental Giro last longer than 200km. I went through 4 of them so far. I have switched to them becaus ethey are the cheapest. And that is still expensive for me as I need 1 tube of cement for about £4 and the tyre at about £16, plus the time it takes to fit them. This is usually a good few days taking into account the ordering of parts, removing of the old one and the gluing, drying, etc.

    So all in all, tubulars work well when they actually on the bike. Nothing wrong there, but I will be switching to clicnhers at the earliest as they are simply not time and espcially financially efficient for me.

    how are you getting through tyres that fast? i use veloflex which are pretty delicate in comparison and would be disappointeded if i got only 1000km out of one, let alone 200km

    if i get small puncture, tufo extreme will fix it fine

    anything bigger, swap tub and put the old one in the 'to be repaired' bag for whenever i'm in the mood for some gluing and sewing
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Put sealant in the tubulars as a preventative measure.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
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