Forum home Mountain biking forum MTB general

The next new standard?

RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
edited March 2015 in MTB general
I have seen a lot of new stuff coming out for 27.5+
How likely is it that standard width is going to get phased out in the same way as 26" went?
Maybe Im being paranoid but I dont want to upgrade to 650b and then find it soon becomes obsolete.

Posts

  • BloggingFitBloggingFit Posts: 919
    Don't see that happening to be honest as that would take the assumption that the whole race scene would move across to 29" as you couldn't race with 27.5"+ for DH and EWS and I don't see them moving wholly across to 29".

    It would be ironic if 27.5"+ became the new width standard for the wheel size and 26" made a come back.
    Bird Aeris : Trek Remedy 9.9 29er : Trek Procaliber 9.8 SL
  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    as you couldn't race with 27.5"+ for DH and EWS

    Why not?
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • benpinnickbenpinnick Posts: 4,148
    as you couldn't race with 27.5"+ for DH and EWS

    Why not?

    I don't think it will stick. We've done big tyres before, and it was never more than a fad for a couple of years before people got bored of it.
    A Flock of Birds
    + some other bikes.
  • BloggingFitBloggingFit Posts: 919
    as you couldn't race with 27.5"+ for DH and EWS

    Why not?
    The effort to roll will negate any grip advantage and from what I hear from fat bike owners the wider tyres don't always offer much more and can at times be a hindrance across trail features.

    Could work for ebikes as they will have more oomph.
    Bird Aeris : Trek Remedy 9.9 29er : Trek Procaliber 9.8 SL
  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    as you couldn't race with 27.5"+ for DH and EWS

    Why not?
    The effort to roll will negate any grip advantage and from what I hear from fat bike owners the wider tyres don't always offer much more and can at times be a hindrance across trail features.

    Could work for ebikes as they will have more oomph.

    Ah, O.K. When you said "couldn't" I took that to mean that there was some rule or other against it.
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • ThewaylanderThewaylander Posts: 8,767
    All new axle standards coming now as well isn't there?

    joyful!
  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    I think we need slightly wider top tubes.
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • HerdwickHerdwick Posts: 523
    I bet until this thread touches 11 replies a couple of new standards will come by...
    what do you think/
    “I am a humanist, which means, in part, that I have tried to behave decently without expectations of rewards or punishments after I am dead.”
    ― Kurt Vonnegut
  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    They could have given us at least a few seasons before reinventing the wheel again.
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • MattharrierMattharrier Posts: 173
    It mostly comes down to marketing, and people with plenty of disposable income buying into the marketing hype. Manufacturers of frames and components can't sell new things to people unless those people are given a reason to. Making a different sized wheel the new standard (because it rolls better and is more stable) means people want that new wheel size, and therefore will buy a new bike to get it. They will then purchase new forks to upgrade the one that came with the new bike, and then new hubs, then new rims...

    By the time they've done that, another wheel size has been marketed heavily, this time slightly smaller so it handles better and is more nimble, but still rolls better and is more stable than the old old wheel size. So people then replace everything again.

    Before long, we may well see someone market 26" wheels (or 600b or whatever) and extoll the virtues of it turning more sharply and so on. All the while we, as consumers, keep buying the new stuff, manufacturers will continue to release new standards, because that's how they keep their shareholders happy.

    Occasionally an actual revolutionary new thing will happen, but mostly it's just marketing BS designed to make us go "ooooo, shiny IHAVETOHAVEIT" (I am deeply cynical, I'll admit, but I'm also pretty much on the money here).
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    All its making me think is why buy a new bike when all its parts will be made obsolete next year. I may as well stick with my 26" bike.
    I was all ready to order my new bike but all these new standards are giving me doubts.
  • A post I can actually relate to on BR for once - http://www.bikeradar.com/road/gear/arti ... fit-43896/

    There is no innovation without experimentation, but MTB companies don't seem to want to develop a current "standard" as its seen a boring in what is an exciting and fast paced sport.

    Its all "*new* *new* *new*" rather than "the same, but better".
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    That article makes sense. It is getting like cars where there is very little cross compatibility.
    Is it really a good time to buy a bike if the wheels and bottom bracket are going to be obsolete soon
    The one I really dont get is the 148 rear hub, who the censored decided another size was needed in between 142 & 150?
    I was just about to get the latest wheel size but bo11ocks to it, I think Im going to stick with 26" until they can decide what they are going to stick with.
    Innovation is good but just just changing sizes isnt innovation, a new frame material or active suspension or a replacement for the derailleur would be innovation.
    Sort out the real problems before adding a couple millimeters to hub widths.
  • Aye, innovation is to solve a problem or to increase performance etc. Not to boost sales (although, this is almost always the main reason).
    Innovation is accomplished through more effective products, processes, services, technologies

    Would love to know the tangible benefit of an extra 6mm on a rear hub.
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    Or the weight saving of loosing 2mm compared to a 150mm hub.
  • HerdwickHerdwick Posts: 523
    Or the weight saving of loosing 2mm compared to a 150mm hub.
    Would love to know the tangible benefit of an extra 6mm on a rear hub.

    the thought behind the wider hub is that the spoke flanges are placed further appart 5mm each side for the front and 3mm for the rear I think, instead of a common 61.5mm, the front goes up to 71.5 and 44.5 to 50.5 for the rear. (the numbers are approximate) this gives the wheel extra strength,
    they could still keep the rear at 150mm standard spacing that all ready exists on the market but the 110mm spacing front is only 20mm through axle compatible, so instead of releasing a only rear compatible upgrade they created a hole new standard as a package.


    I hope what I said makes some sence, I'm recovering from a crash... :?
    “I am a humanist, which means, in part, that I have tried to behave decently without expectations of rewards or punishments after I am dead.”
    ― Kurt Vonnegut
  • yes but, in the real world, it will make censored all difference.
  • HerdwickHerdwick Posts: 523
    yes but, in the real world, it will make censored all difference.

    totally agree and thats why I stuck with a 26er and try to enjoy my riding.
    “I am a humanist, which means, in part, that I have tried to behave decently without expectations of rewards or punishments after I am dead.”
    ― Kurt Vonnegut
  • scoiscoi Posts: 103
    If 29" was as good as some make out, it wouldn't have taken so long for it to become popular and also there would be a 32". Choice is great and some will feel the benefits of bigger wheels but I don't think any of the 3 current sizes will be relegated to the scrap heap any time soon.

    My problem is that being small I find that 29's too big, and even though I havent tried one in anger I don't think i'd be as confident controlling one on a twisting trail. I much prefer 26" but some manufacturers have selected one of the other sizes for their full range significantly cutting down my choices for my next bike.
  • ThewaylanderThewaylander Posts: 8,767
    Struggle to find any new 26" bikes.

    Got a good deal on some 26" wheels recently though as everyone seems to be clearing the stock down a bit.. that's a win.
  • paul.skibumpaul.skibum Posts: 4,068
    The supposed added stiffness of this new "standard" will go unnoticed by 98.35% of all riders. The minority that might feel some benefits should not be a driver behind the industry changing even if racing is the pinnacle from which products trickle down.

    Any changes must bring tangible benefits to the common man in my opinion. We now have a scenario where forks become even harder to buy for your bike because you have to double check you didn't inadvertently buy the boost version.

    Meanwhile my hardtail needs a 100mm 26inch straight steerer fork that no one makes any more and I'd like to upgrade to get a 15mm axle if I am keeping the Cove. But I am going to have to go second hand by the looks of things.
    Closet jockey wheel pimp censored .
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    There are still some nice 26" bikes in production. The Transition Surpressor is really nice. Kona just brought out two new versions of the Process with 26" wheels. Banshee and Pivot have some nice 26" bikes. Cotic, Evil and Stanton are still making 26".
  • Lewis ALewis A Posts: 767
    There are still some nice 26" bikes in production. The Transition Surpressor is really nice. Kona just brought out two new versions of the Process with 26" wheels. Banshee and Pivot have some nice 26" bikes. Cotic, Evil and Stanton are still making 26".
    Cotic are killing the 26" Soul! Still the BFe though...
    Cube Analog 2012 with various upgrades.
Sign In or Register to comment.