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Cycle Challenge 560 miles from manchester to John O Groats

KeyringkeyKeyringkey Posts: 30
edited January 2015 in Road beginners
I am doing a charity 560 miles cycle challenge from John 'O Groats to Manchester on the 4th May 2015. I will be riding a Carrera TDF Road Bike. I started cycling two months ago. I am looking to complete this in 5-6 days.

I am looking for some advice:

1. What do you think about the bike I am using?
2. Preparation?
3. Training?

Any advice would be welcomed.

DG
560 mile cycle challenge to raise funds for. http://www.justgiving.co.uk/davidgolden

Posts

  • tlw1tlw1 Posts: 18,853
    The most important thing is the bike is mechanically sound, fits you and you are comfortable, as you cycle more there will always be a compelling reason to upgrade!

    Training is about getting used to multiday cycling, so as much back to back cycling as you can do. When I did the JOGLE I commuted to work as training (70 miles a day)
  • dstev55dstev55 Posts: 742
    You may struggle up steep hills (which I'm sure you'll inevitably hit) with the gearing setup on that bike. From what I can see it is set up for a bit more speed rather than climbing as its only got a 12-26t cassette and a 52/38t chain set. Most road bikes have a compact 50/34 chain set and an 11-28t cassette which will you give you a few more lower gears that help with climbing.

    I don't want to put you off as you may be OK depending on the route but you may want to try and take it up some decent climbs beforehand to make sure it is OK for you.
  • Thank you guys for your advice.

    I have cycled up some steep hills around the Pennine Hills. very tough including the longest continuous hill climb. The Carrera TDF seems to handle the rides. Its a very good bike. I cycled from Blackpool to Littleborough, Greater Manchester which was 56 Miles. Again the bike performed well. I would love to do the end to end, but finances prevent me from doing so.

    I take your points on board and I am looking at a endurance sport type of bike.

    What do you think?
    560 mile cycle challenge to raise funds for. http://www.justgiving.co.uk/davidgolden
  • matthew h wrote:
    The most important thing is the bike is mechanically sound, fits you and you are comfortable, as you cycle more there will always be a compelling reason to upgrade!

    Training is about getting used to multiday cycling, so as much back to back cycling as you can do. When I did the JOGLE I commuted to work as training (70 miles a day)

    :D Thank you. Great photos
    560 mile cycle challenge to raise funds for. http://www.justgiving.co.uk/davidgolden
  • dstev55 wrote:
    You may struggle up steep hills (which I'm sure you'll inevitably hit) with the gearing setup on that bike. From what I can see it is set up for a bit more speed rather than climbing as its only got a 12-26t cassette and a 52/38t chain set. Most road bikes have a compact 50/34 chain set and an 11-28t cassette which will you give you a few more lower gears that help with climbing.

    I don't want to put you off as you may be OK depending on the route but you may want to try and take it up some decent climbs beforehand to make sure it is OK for you.

    Thank you for your advice.

    It seems ok when I am riding up hills. where i live you cannot escape the hills,lol. but I am thinking of another bike some sort of endurance bike

    DG
    560 mile cycle challenge to raise funds for. http://www.justgiving.co.uk/davidgolden
  • dstev55dstev55 Posts: 742
    If it rides well for you and its in mechanically good condition then go for it, don't get another bike just for the sake of it!
  • w00dsterw00dster Posts: 879
    I don't know what gearing is on your current bike (I know you said you are looking at possibly changing bike - but the same applies), its worth making sure that you are able to ride day after day doing tough hills.
    I can get around most hills around where I live on my 11-23, but I know the next day I wouldn't want to face it again. I would spend a fair amount of time planning the route, looking at the terrain and making sure you have adequate gearing.
    Without wanting to sound rude, riding 50 odd miles one day isn't the same as riding 100 miles over consequtive days. Also make sure you are really happy with the comfort of the bike. May isn't that far off in training terms. I always find one off events reasonably easy, but its getting on the bike again when the @rse is sore, the back is tired, the legs are aching and your faced with a hill, thats the tough bit. The more comfortable you are on your bike the better.
    Good luck with it though, I'm sure once you get into the swing of the training you'll absolutely love it - during the ride you may not love it quite so much, but afterwards you certainly will.
  • Thank you for the quality comments guys.

    I have just bought a Raleigh revenio 1. This seems to be the bike I will use on my cycle challenge. There has been some good reviews on this bike which prompt me to purchase.

    I must admit though the Carrera TFD is a very good bike that handles well even on snowy hills. I have also found the High5 energy gels and drinks to be very useful.

    I rode 60 miles instead of 50 mile because I took the wrong turning at a roundabout,lol. bought a garmin edge touring now so hopefully i will be ok for navigation.

    Anymore tips would be welcomed.

    DG 8)
    560 mile cycle challenge to raise funds for. http://www.justgiving.co.uk/davidgolden
  • I did an unsupported Jogle in June last year, if you're using the popular Jogle routes then the hills won't be that bad (unless you do something silly like go over Hardknott Pass like we did) - the worst hills are in the South West. You don't say if you're being supported and this will make a difference to the effort required. I ran a compact setup with a 30T rear and this was fine for most hills even fully loaded, but everyone is different.
  • I did an unsupported Jogle in June last year, if you're using the popular Jogle routes then the hills won't be that bad (unless you do something silly like go over Hardknott Pass like we did) - the worst hills are in the South West. You don't say if you're being supported and this will make a difference to the effort required. I ran a compact setup with a 30T rear and this was fine for most hills even fully loaded, but everyone is different.

    What do you mean supported? If I am thinking right then yes i have a driver, who will be taking care of my bike spares and clothing ect.

    Thank you for your input

    David
    560 mile cycle challenge to raise funds for. http://www.justgiving.co.uk/davidgolden
  • Keyringkey wrote:
    I did an unsupported Jogle in June last year, if you're using the popular Jogle routes then the hills won't be that bad (unless you do something silly like go over Hardknott Pass like we did) - the worst hills are in the South West. You don't say if you're being supported and this will make a difference to the effort required. I ran a compact setup with a 30T rear and this was fine for most hills even fully loaded, but everyone is different.

    What do you mean supported? If I am thinking right then yes i have a driver, who will be taking care of my bike spares and clothing ect.

    Thank you for your input

    David

    Yes that's what I meant, it means you can travel light which will speed your progress and you can plan to have a cup of tea waiting for you!
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