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Whyte Dorset as a Winter\Training Bike?

daxplusplusdaxplusplus Posts: 631
edited February 2015 in Commuting chat
Hi All,

Was looking at getting one of these http://road.cc/content/review/110792-whyte-dorset-commuterroad-bike (2014 version with money off) and wondered if anyone had any opinions either good or bad?

In particular, has anyone had experience fitting really good mudguards that not only keep me and the bike in a drier\cleaner state but also doesn't flick up spray to the rider behind. I know that Whyte have their own mudguards but from reviews it appears that they fail on the "spray on rider behind" front.

Thanks.
Sometimes you're the hammer, sometimes you're the nail

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  • timothywtimothyw Posts: 2,482
    http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/product ... -dorset-14
    This one with the HyRds for £750? Looks a bit of a billy bargain to me.
  • Indeed but collect in store and size of 54 only.
    Sometimes you're the hammer, sometimes you're the nail

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  • I have a Whyte Dorset, and I love it. It's my everyday commuter and winter training bike.

    As for the mudguards, I have some of the Whyte guards, and they are good at keeping me dry, but certainly the rear doesn't go down as far as it could. I don't think they are particularly bad and haven't had any complaints from people behind me! They certainly fit well...

    One note, the Maxxis tyres that came with it are very grippy, but I don't think the puncture protection is as great as it could be. After a couple of punctures I replaced them with Conti Gatorskins which roll better as well.

    Hope that helps
  • Thanks for the feedback - much appreciated.

    I've gone and bought the bike and ordered the guards from Whyte. I'll look to add some mud flaps e.g. http://www.buddyflaps.com/ and reckon they'll finish the job off.

    Just had the one, short test ride on the bike and it feels great, pretty high at the front but that's fine. Just that lovely feeling of not ruining another set of rims is reason enough to upgrade my commuter to this. It's not too heavy, is still very much a road bike - can't wait to get on the road and start commuting with it.

    Just got to wait for this icy weather to sod off (and sort out the pedals, fit lights, etc).

    If the tyres prove an issue I may switch to 25mm Vittoria Rubino Pro III tyres (my current favourites) .. I'll see how it goes.
    Sometimes you're the hammer, sometimes you're the nail

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  • Good move! Those buddy flaps look good.

    FYI, if you're wanting a rack for commuting duties, the skinny Tortec Velocity rack (e.g. http://www.gooutdoors.co.uk/tortec-velo ... ck-p267860) fits very well, including over the Whyte mudguards. Great for making the bike multi-purpose, without getting too ugly!
  • Wow, slow down .. a rack might be a step too far. Haven't got my pipe and slippers yet ;-)

    Only joking, thanks for the recommendation.
    Sometimes you're the hammer, sometimes you're the nail

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  • luv2rideluv2ride Posts: 2,362
    Wow, slow down .. a rack might be a step too far. Haven't got my pipe and slippers yet ;-)

    Only joking, thanks for the recommendation.

    Don't knock the rack, the Tortec Velocity is really low profile so in effect is barely visible from the rear. At the GoOutdoors price it's also a steal. I have one on my Tifosi CK7 and it's useful to have. That Whyte looks nice BTW
    Scott Solace 10 disc - Kinesis Crosslight Pro6 disc - Scott CR1 SL - Pinnacle Arkose X 650b - Pinnacle Arkose 1x11 "monster cross" - Specialized Singlecross...& an Ernie Ball Musicman Stingray 4 string...
  • Luv2ride wrote:
    Wow, slow down .. a rack might be a step too far. Haven't got my pipe and slippers yet ;-)

    Only joking, thanks for the recommendation.

    Don't knock the rack, the Tortec Velocity is really low profile so in effect is barely visible from the rear. At the GoOutdoors price it's also a steal. I have one on my Tifosi CK7 and it's useful to have. That Whyte looks nice BTW

    :D

    The bike looks like an awesome piece of kit .. I'm really looking forward to using it. And it may well get the rack ..
    Sometimes you're the hammer, sometimes you're the nail

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  • bigmonkabigmonka Posts: 361
    Does that rack fit around disc brake calipers? If it does it looks like a great buy as its tiny and cheap!
  • Yes, that rack fits my Whyte Dorset fine, even with discs. Will add a photo if I get chance.

    So yes, it is a bargain and I think a great rack. I can't see myself ever putting a full size rack on again unless I do some touring...
  • bigmonkabigmonka Posts: 361
    I've just had a quick look and it appears that the calipers on the Dorset are chainstay mounted which probably explains why they'd fit, whereas the brakes on my bike are mounted on the seatstay so that rack would need to bend around them :-(
  • Quick review

    Lovely, lovely brakes. My left foot occasionally clips the rear caliper .. not too bothered by this as my feet move around a lot on the pedals so they are always touching the crank arm for instance. Not as powerful as they could be but that might be that they need more bedding in \perhaps me getting used to them .. however it's a little academic as the limiting factor for me is the tyre on a road bike anyway.

    The Whyte mudguards look stylish and robust but need (like all mudguards) mud flaps to make them truly effective. Mud flaps ordered.

    Tiagra gear change is functional but I've gotten used to ultegra\105 on another bike so would upgrade if I had the cash and my time again (which I haven't and can't, so again a little academic).

    Handlebars are quite wide but I love their shape as they flow into the drops. Stylish bar tape looks good too. Front of the bike is high so feel a bit disconnected from what the tyre is doing but that, again, is probably me needing to get used to the bike. I will drop the handlebars to get over this a little and see if that helps on the next point ..

    Not getting on with the seat at all - I think it's a combination of the sit up position on the bike, the seat needing to be further back (I will adjust this over the weekend) and the shape (bit too wide for my liking).

    The above might sound a little negative but it's a great bike .. I guess I'd prefer to live somewhere that I could take my race bike to work every day but for something that will get me through censored weather, not ruin my clothes, not have to be continuously cleaned to keep running, save me embarrassment\shame on group training rides and just gets on and does the job - this bike is spot on.
    Sometimes you're the hammer, sometimes you're the nail

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  • Another Whyte fan here. I have the Malvern (hybrid with non-drop bars and front suspension) and I love it to pieces. Had it for 2 years and 2,000 miles.

    With it I've averaged 15mph on a 60 mile charity road ride and ridden along a deserted white sand beach in the Outer Hebrides. And everything in between.

    Totally in love - it's nippy in traffic on the commute and does me for weekend road rides (I'm happy bimbling around the countryside admiring the views), but will also handle basic off-roading. Everything I wanted in a hybrid. :D

    Similar to you, I got the 2012 model reduced in early 2013. :)

    I'm 33 and I have a rack for the commute. Hate biking with a rucksack!

    I must have the sort of ar$e Whyte design for as I've always loved the stock saddle and never have any pain, even though I don't wear padded shorts!

    I hadn't heard of Whyte when I went into the LBS. Had been looking at Specialized hybrids online but their geometry just didn't suit me. Hopped on my baby and knew right away it was mine.
  • pinkteapot wrote:
    .. and ridden along a deserted white sand beach in the Outer Hebrides.

    Sounds awesome .. I probably spend way too much of my speeding through countryside I never sit up and take notice of. My loss.
    Sometimes you're the hammer, sometimes you're the nail

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  • Probably means you're a lot fitter than me. :D

    My Whyte is just *fun*. Feel like a kid on it. And they use some nice components for the style/price range of bike with their cross/hybrids.
  • Seat adjusted - much more comfortable. Finding that I'm loving the disc brakes even in the dry - a lot more comfortable around traffic (have to watch out for risk compensation) thanks to better feel.

    It's turning out to be a very good training platform .. more comfort (due to tyres), keeping me dry and un-fussed (proper mudguards and not flimsy ones that wear out) and not unduly heavy\unresponsive. Just don't have to worry about the bike, just get on and train.
    Sometimes you're the hammer, sometimes you're the nail

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  • bigmonkabigmonka Posts: 361
    It's all sounding good! The thing which I've found with disc brakes is just how nice it is that the braking is consistent no matter what the conditions - so what you're enjoying in the dry you'll also get to enjoy in the wet!
  • Absolutely. Also my mechanical sympathy nerve is at peace with itself - no more cringing inside because the rims are being trashed cos it rained yesterday and I didn't have time to sort out the brake pads. I'm so glad that for my high mileage bike I've moved over to the dark side and gotten discs. Should have done it earlier.
    Sometimes you're the hammer, sometimes you're the nail

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  • Love my disc brakes too. :D

    Loved them even more when a car driver ran a red light and almost wiped me out. Not entirely convinced that rim brakes would have stopped me in time. :shock:
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