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Pedal Power Keeps You Young

seajaysseajays Posts: 330
edited January 2015 in Commuting chat
The analysis of fit amateur cyclists aged 55 to 79 found that many were physically and biologically much younger than most people of the same age.
http://www.itv.com/news/2015-01-06/good ... you-young/
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  • andy9964andy9964 Posts: 930
    I know an old guy, must be about 78/79 now, as he told me a few years ago, he got rid of his MTB when he turned 75., and as far as I can work out, he has at least 9 bikes
    He now only does road riding (must have at least 60 years behind him), 25-30 miles a day...…......every day.
    If the weather is too bad, he gets on the turbo.
    He can talk for hours about cycling, I love the stories he tells about his youth, and his enthusiasm is more like a 10 year old on Xmas day
  • WheelspinnerWheelspinner Posts: 5,552
    I just bought my mother a new bike for her birthday. She'd been riding my old MTB for a fair while, but finding it a bit tough to handle getting on and off it with the (high) crossbar. So, a new mixte style job was just the ticket, and she's back out and about most days if the weather permits. Still walks a few miles most days too, at a cracking pace.

    She turned 81 this year. :D
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  • Hope I can still get my leg over when I'm 81 :?

    Bit of a non-story though. One might also hypothesise that fit amateur ballet dancers aged 55 to 79 found that many were physically and biologically much younger than most people of the same age or that unfit professional smokers aged 55 to 79 found that many were physically and biologically much older than most people of the same age
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  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 57,858 Lives Here
    Aren't too many sports you can do in your 50s,60s and in some cases 70s.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 17,121
    Aren't too many sports you can do in your 50s,60s and in some cases 70s.
    You can do most sports into your 70s, if you want to.
    I know one guy who played club rugby into his 70s.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 57,858 Lives Here
    PBlakeney wrote:
    Aren't too many sports you can do in your 50s,60s and in some cases 70s.
    You can do most sports into your 70s, if you want to.
    I know one guy who played club rugby into his 70s.

    Yeah we all do.

    I know many many more who struggle to do any impact sport, including running.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 17,121
    PBlakeney wrote:
    Aren't too many sports you can do in your 50s,60s and in some cases 70s.
    You can do most sports into your 70s, if you want to.
    I know one guy who played club rugby into his 70s.

    Yeah we all do.

    I know many many more who struggle to do any impact sport, including running.
    I know of some in their 20s who struggle to get off the couch.
    It is all sweeping generalisations and meaningless.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 57,858 Lives Here
    PBlakeney wrote:
    PBlakeney wrote:
    Aren't too many sports you can do in your 50s,60s and in some cases 70s.
    You can do most sports into your 70s, if you want to.
    I know one guy who played club rugby into his 70s.

    Yeah we all do.

    I know many many more who struggle to do any impact sport, including running.
    I know of some in their 20s who struggle to get off the couch.
    It is all sweeping generalisations and meaningless.

    :roll:

    Aren't you a fun person to have a conversation with?

    Generalisations have their uses. Quite a few actually. There's one I'm finding useful right there.

    Broadly speaking, cycling is more accessible to older people than most sports - because it's not weight bearing.

    It's the same reason you see some people from other sports getting into cycling as part of their rehab. I've met quite a few ex rugby players who started cycling as part of rehab and got the bug, for example. Same with former rowers with bad backs.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 17,121
    Aren't too many sports you can do in your 50s,60s and in some cases 70s.
    It was you who started the negative posts. :roll:
    Swimming is better than cycling for the elderly, but my point was that any sport can be done which was a positive response.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • Manc33Manc33 Posts: 2,157
    I'll never forget that white haired marathon runner I saw, jogging about as fast as I was going on my bike. He looked about 80. I remember because he had pink shorts on and they were really short. I mean the most girly pink as well like, pale pink.

    Most cyclists drink which ages you, damages organs, kills brain cells.... then they talk about being fit? Cyclists that plan a route out around pubs when alcohol dehydrates you lol, I just try to ignore this stuff.

    I thought people that look young for their age always did, I mean they look 12 when they are 14, they look 15 when they are 18 and so on.
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