Forum home Road cycling forum Road beginners

Advantages or not of Clipless Pedals

Sutton_RiderSutton_Rider Posts: 455
edited April 2015 in Road beginners
I've been using clipless pedals for about 6 months and during that time I have had pain at both sides of both knees after about 30 miles or so. This pain lasts a couple of days. I've had a bike fit a week or so ago, the only thing that changed was the saddle that was moved 5mm forward, it made no difference. I'm told it may be ligaments or tendons. I'm going to go back to ordinary pedals and trainers to see if the problem goes away. 1. Does anyone else have or had this problems? 2. What advantages are there in using clipless over say trainers?
http://www.qsl.net/g4gvb
Ridley Fenix SL Ultegra Di2 - 2020 (Summer Bike)
Carrera Virtuoso - 2015 (Winter Bike)
Carrera Zelos - (Turbo Bike)
ex Focus Cayo Ultegra Di2 - 2016
ex Giant Defy 1 - 2015

Posts

  • diamonddogdiamonddog Posts: 3,402
    Take a look at the link below with reference to knee pain and cleat position etc.
    http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/article/t ... t-2-17445/
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,196
    2. What advantages are there in using clipless over say trainers?

    If you've previously used trainers and are now using clipless, then you should already have an understanding of the benefits of clipless pedals.
  • Imposter wrote:
    2. What advantages are there in using clipless over say trainers?

    If you've previously used trainers and are now using clipless, then you should already have an understanding of the benefits of clipless pedals.

    That, but clipless offers more supportive shoes, and keeps your feet in place. That's pretty much the sum total of the benefits, but I wouldn't want to be without them.

    But if you are experiencing pain whilst using them, the issue is likely to be with some aspect of your bike fit and cleat placement, but you might also need orthotics/footbeds, cleat shimming, different pedals with more float, etc. Hopefully it's the former as the latter can get very expensive, but you'd do well to read up and consider seeing a bike fitter that specialises in this area.
  • Thanks Diamondog that's going to take some getting through. Imposter, I don't have an understanding. I started riding 7 months ago, totally unfit and in trainers and only riding less than 10 miles at a time. I switched to clipless during that 7 months and my fitness and distance ridden increased. So if there was any advantage in going clipless it was lost with the other changes going on. That's why I asked the question.
    http://www.qsl.net/g4gvb
    Ridley Fenix SL Ultegra Di2 - 2020 (Summer Bike)
    Carrera Virtuoso - 2015 (Winter Bike)
    Carrera Zelos - (Turbo Bike)
    ex Focus Cayo Ultegra Di2 - 2016
    ex Giant Defy 1 - 2015
  • styxdstyxd Posts: 3,234
    Go and get your money back from that bike fitter; it sounds like they didn't do a good job.
  • Also you get to forget to clip out and fall off!
  • JayKostaJayKosta Posts: 635
    Regardless of any mechanical advantage to clipless, if you can't find a set that is comfortable, then they aren't an advantage to you.
    Toeclips and straps with a stiff soled (but with grip) trainer shoe can work fine, and allow much more range of motion to your foot position.

    A big advantage of clipless compared to toeclips and straps is that clipless are easier to use for many people - no need to bend over to tighten / release the straps, etc.

    Jay Kosta
    Endwell NY USA
  • AzharAzhar Posts: 247
    i remember the knee pains when I went clipless. definitely a bike fit issue. once I paid for a bike fit at my LBS ironed out those knee issues and I;ve not had any pains since then and this was several years ago.
  • ForumNewbieForumNewbie Posts: 1,664
    You could try hard plastic toe-clips without straps, like these:
    http://www.acycles.co.uk/zefal-christop ... wwod_kYAyg
    I used these with these flat MKS Sylvan touring pedals before I went clipless:
    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/mks-sylvan-tour ... 00012118uk

    These combined work well and are better than just using flat pedals on their own. They are also easy to get your feet in and out of.
  • fludeyfludey Posts: 384
    I used to use toe straps years ago...then after a long break from cycling came back and went clip less from start...initially I had knee pain but after some fettling and getting the position right I would never go back. Sounds like fitter didn't do a great job setting you up.
    I assume you have cleats that have some degree of float in them and not zero degree!?
    Felt AR4
    Planet X Pro Carbon 105
    MTB Kona Kikapu Deluxe with a few upgrades!!
  • dj58dj58 Posts: 2,169
    OP. what pedal/cleat/shoes have you been using and who set them up, you or the bike fitter?
  • Thanks for all the replies, your inputs are appreciated. I am using Shimano RO88 shoes with the yellow cleats, so about 6 deg of float. Initially I set the cleats up and when I had the bike fit they were checked and found to be spot on. The guy who did the bike fit is well known in the area and came very highly recommended by several people, some of which are very experienced cyclists. I think with the help of my other half who was a podiatrist we have a good idea of what the problem is. I have 'forefoot varus', in other words I need something to put under the ball of the foot to tip it, I need 5 degs on the left foot and about 3 on the right.
    We have made some wedges to fit under the insoles to test the theory. I had a short ride during the week and all was OK and today I've been out for 34 miles, again with no issues. I'm going to take the wedges out next and try it again to see if the issues return. If it looks like the wedges are the answer I intend to buy some wedges that fit between the shoe and the cleat.
    http://www.qsl.net/g4gvb
    Ridley Fenix SL Ultegra Di2 - 2020 (Summer Bike)
    Carrera Virtuoso - 2015 (Winter Bike)
    Carrera Zelos - (Turbo Bike)
    ex Focus Cayo Ultegra Di2 - 2016
    ex Giant Defy 1 - 2015
  • fludeyfludey Posts: 384
    That could do the trick I ride with about 2deg under one foot...don't forget the longer bolts! Especially going upto 5 degs will be quite thick. If you look on eBay you can often find the proper Shimano ones complete with longer bolts.
    Felt AR4
    Planet X Pro Carbon 105
    MTB Kona Kikapu Deluxe with a few upgrades!!
  • JoeLiamJoeLiam Posts: 17
    You could try hard plastic toe-clips without straps, like these:
    http://www.acycles.co.uk/zefal-christop ... wwod_kYAyg
    I used these with these flat MKS Sylvan touring pedals before I went clipless:
    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/mks-sylvan-tour ... 00012118uk

    These combined work well and are better than just using flat pedals on their own. They are also easy to get your feet in and out of.
    I've been using the first ones posted. I'm new to this road cycling malarkey and ain't worked up to clipless. Any advice on what good cycling shoes would work well with the above toe-clips ?
  • paul2718paul2718 Posts: 471
    I realise this is now old, but,
    I have 'forefoot varus', in other words I need something to put under the ball of the foot to tip it, I need 5 degs on the left foot and about 3 on the right.

    I have essentially this. When I first started four years ago or so I ended up with a very painful knee after my first 30 mile ride. I added some wedges and the problems cleared up. What is interesting is that I reckon I'm much less sensitive now. The muscles and bits that hold the knee together are now accustomed to the motion. I started off using shoe inserts and wedges under the cleats, now I'm using fewer shims under the cleats and have no knee pain.

    I think there may be an analogy to your saddle problems. If you can get over the hump into regular long miles then I suspect you will find saddles and shorts become much less critical.

    Paul
  • JoeLiam wrote:
    You could try hard plastic toe-clips without straps, like these:
    http://www.acycles.co.uk/zefal-christop ... wwod_kYAyg
    I used these with these flat MKS Sylvan touring pedals before I went clipless:
    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/mks-sylvan-tour ... 00012118uk

    These combined work well and are better than just using flat pedals on their own. They are also easy to get your feet in and out of.
    I've been using the first ones posted. I'm new to this road cycling malarkey and ain't worked up to clipless. Any advice on what good cycling shoes would work well with the above toe-clips ?

    Shoes made for SPD (recessed) cleats work well. Try and avoid anything with protrusions on the upper, as they can get caught.
  • JoeLiamJoeLiam Posts: 17
    JoeLiam wrote:
    You could try hard plastic toe-clips without straps, like these:
    http://www.acycles.co.uk/zefal-christop ... wwod_kYAyg
    I used these with these flat MKS Sylvan touring pedals before I went clipless:
    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/mks-sylvan-tour ... 00012118uk

    These combined work well and are better than just using flat pedals on their own. They are also easy to get your feet in and out of.
    I've been using the first ones posted. I'm new to this road cycling malarkey and ain't worked up to clipless. Any advice on what good cycling shoes would work well with the above toe-clips ?

    Shoes made for SPD (recessed) cleats work well. Try and avoid anything with protrusions on the upper, as they can get caught.
    Thanks Simon, now to get my head round all the different sizings. Every site gives a different EU to UK comparison. Best go to LBC and try a few on.
  • ForumNewbieForumNewbie Posts: 1,664
    JoeLiam wrote:
    JoeLiam wrote:
    You could try hard plastic toe-clips without straps, like these:
    http://www.acycles.co.uk/zefal-christop ... wwod_kYAyg
    I used these with these flat MKS Sylvan touring pedals before I went clipless:
    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/mks-sylvan-tour ... 00012118uk

    These combined work well and are better than just using flat pedals on their own. They are also easy to get your feet in and out of.
    I've been using the first ones posted. I'm new to this road cycling malarkey and ain't worked up to clipless. Any advice on what good cycling shoes would work well with the above toe-clips ?

    Shoes made for SPD (recessed) cleats work well. Try and avoid anything with protrusions on the upper, as they can get caught.
    Thanks Simon, now to get my head round all the different sizings. Every site gives a different EU to UK comparison. Best go to LBC and try a few on.
    I bought a pair of Specialized shoes about 5 years ago a bit like the ones below:
    http://www.specializedconceptstore.co.u ... hoescasual
    and I used to wear these with my MKS Sylvan pedals and Zefal toeclips. I still wear them, now with cleats as I have moved to SPDs, but they were just as good with the flats and toeclips.

    If you do want to try SPDs, that type of shoe is good as they have a ridged sole a bit like trainers but stiffer, which makes it easy to pedal with only one foot clipped in, and the other foot moved forward pressing on pedal, when coming up to junctions or in busy traffic where you might need to put a foot down quickly.
  • JoeLiamJoeLiam Posts: 17
    Just got myself some MO64s from LBC, test ride them tomorrow.
  • A more normative approach to understanding the advantages, remove the clipless pedals, put the old ones back on and go ride 20 miles in your trainers :mrgreen:
Sign In or Register to comment.