Forum home Road cycling forum Workshop

Wheel truing jig from Planet-X

small_blokesmall_bloke Posts: 222
edited January 2015 in Workshop
Is this truing-jig any good for basic wheel truing. I'm not doing any wheel building.


It was near £100 a few weeks go but now £56

Their other stand also seems to be on offer but maybe only for today as a special deal.

http://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/TOJWWTS/jo ... shop-stand

TOJWWTS_P1.jpg


Other stand on special deal. - "Pro-stand"

http://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/TOJWPWTS/j ... shop-stand

TOJWPWTS_P1.jpg

Posts

  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 16,015
    Top one is fine. I have one - use it for truing and wheel building. Excellent value at £100 so £56 is almost doubly good!
    Faster than a tent.......
  • Rolf F wrote:
    Top one is fine. I have one - use it for truing and wheel building. Excellent value at £100 so £56 is almost doubly good!

    Thanks for info - will get the top one.
  • redveeredvee Posts: 11,921
    The downside to ordering from PX is the cheaper courier is Yodel.
    Rolf F wrote:
    Top one is fine. I have one - use it for truing and wheel building. Excellent value at £100 so £56 is almost doubly good!

    Can you do me some pics of the base as my use will be sat on the floor so need to mount it on a piece of wood for stability.
    I've added a signature to prove it is still possible.
  • The top one is basically a copy of the Park TS 2.2 which is an incredibly solid and reliable piece of kit. Mine has built probably close to a thousand wheels over the years and it's just as good as new. I did once need to re-align it to have the wheel centered, but since then it never needed further adjustments.
    The design is pretty simple and provided they have done things properly there is no reason why the Planet X copy should be inferior.
    It needs to be mounted on a base. I did drill a couple of holes on a 2 inch thick plank of wood and then bolted the TS 2.2 tool in place.
  • I bought one of these sets from rose bikes. Fairly basic but for the money it's OK and I've built some wheels using it.
    http://www.rosebikes.co.uk/search/find/ ... tering+set.
  • StillGoingStillGoing Posts: 5,207
    I have the top one and like Ugo has posted, it did need centering as it was right side biased. I don't have mine permanently mounted but it is sturdy enough to just stand on the bench as and when I need to use it without securing it.
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • The top one is basically a copy of the Park TS 2.2 which is an incredibly solid and reliable piece of kit. Mine has built probably close to a thousand wheels over the years and it's just as good as new.

    Thanks again for the info everyone. I guess the one from Rose bikes is relatively cheap and also comes with a dishing tool.

    I think I still prefer the Planet-X copy of the Park Tool jig. Also if its good enough for Ugo (who seems to be a respected wheel builder on this forum) then that's good enough for me.
    philthy3 wrote:
    I don't have mine permanently mounted but it is sturdy enough to just stand on the bench as and when I need to use it without securing it.

    Also good to know i don't have to permanently mount it somewhere to keep it sturdy. Its only for occasional use. For some reason I find wheel truing very therapeutic.
  • I think I still prefer the Planet-X copy of the Park Tool jig. Also if its good enough for Ugo (who seems to be a respected wheel builder on this forum) then that's good enough for me.

    Ugo said he has the Park TS 2.2, not the Planet X copy... :wink:
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 16,015
    redvee wrote:
    Can you do me some pics of the base as my use will be sat on the floor so need to mount it on a piece of wood for stability.

    Of course!

    Here you go. No extra base needed. As you can see, it comes with additional support feet. You could screw a wooden base to it but I can't see the point. It weighs a lot and unless you are trying to true a cast iron wheel I can't see that it won't be stable enough as it is. I usually use it with it sat on the living room carpet. No problems with that aside from a vague feeling of Ugo-ish disapproval....!

    The PX stand is probably near enough comparable to the Park one in function. The only slight functional imperfection is that the caliper arms are relatively crude duplicate stampings so one has a sharper edge to the front and the other a sharper edge to the back. But I'm nowhere near able to make a wheel accurately enough that that that miniscule issue might make a difference! Not sure if Parks effort is any better there though.

    P1020728_zps62215256.jpg
    Faster than a tent.......
  • Spot on Rolf. Thanks for the great pic. By your description it sounds very sturdy too. Sounds like a good buy.
  • Rolf F wrote:
    I usually use it with it sat on the living room carpet. No problems with that aside from a vague feeling of Ugo-ish disapproval....!

    Au contraier... I lace wheels on the carpet... it' the most comfortable place to be... I've tried doing it on a chair, but it's not as good
  • redveeredvee Posts: 11,921
    My last wheel was laced on the carpet, easier to have all the parts spread out within easy reach including a bottle of beer, maybe the beer explains why it took three attempts.
    I've added a signature to prove it is still possible.
  • rrsodlrrsodl Posts: 486
    The top one is basically a copy of the Park TS 2.2 which is an incredibly solid and reliable piece of kit. Mine has built probably close to a thousand wheels over the years and it's just as good as new. I did once need to re-align it to have the wheel centered, but since then it never needed further adjustments.
    The design is pretty simple and provided they have done things properly there is no reason why the Planet X copy should be inferior.
    It needs to be mounted on a base. I did drill a couple of holes on a 2 inch thick plank of wood and then bolted the TS 2.2 tool in place.

    I thought you had the TS 2, earlier model of the TS 2.2 :)

    The Planet-X is a very interesting copy. I wonder what Parktools would have to say about copy rights.

    This jig has recently come in the market and Planet-X offer it at best price it seems. I think it will seriously dent the sales of the home version of the wheel truing jig made by Parktools.

    I originally mounted my TS2.2 on a £10 kitchen chopping board I found in TK Max, a bargain as a chopping board but it was destined to go under the TS2.2 :D After I while I purchased the dedicated base for the jig from Parktools and I have to say it was well worth the £30+ I paid for it. I still use the chopping board though but under the dedicate base.

    I saw a video the other day where Parktools were presenting a similar jig to the TS2.2 all in blue. Not too sure what market is intended for but I think I prefer the TS2.2.

    A friend built me a truing stand from the plans found in the Roger Musson wheel building book and I have to say it's a beauty. Built from solid oak. Much lighter than a TS 2.2 but less practical I think. It's hard to do a quick check on a wheel with the tyre on. Maybe that will change as it's not the finished article yet. I found that it's easy to move it around the house and I have even taken it to the living room without upsetting my wife too much :lol:
  • redveeredvee Posts: 11,921
    Mine arrived this morning and it's heavy, double checked the weight with a set of scales and only 8kg.
    I've added a signature to prove it is still possible.
  • dinyulldinyull Posts: 2,964
    Slight hijack, but how straightforward is wheel truing?

    Need to sort my rear wheel out and looking at £12 at LBS - this jig would have pay for itself over a few years.
  • Dinyull wrote:
    Slight hijack, but how straightforward is wheel truing?

    Need to sort my rear wheel out and looking at £12 at LBS - this jig would have pay for itself over a few years.

    Simply truing of a wheel that's a little off is simple if you are logical and patient. I learned to do it from reading on here and other sites and have done it a few times just using the forks - flip the bike over and a couple of toothpicks blue tacked as a guide! Not ideal but it's worked fine for me and even successfully replaced a few broken spokes with the same method. BUT - if you are needing to true a wheel frequently enough to pay tha censored cover the cost of a stand (even a cheap one) then the wheel itself must be poorly built - or - under built for you an your riding style. Since I started only using Harry Rowland wheels the only wheels I've had to do anything with (other than a half turn on one spoke once) have been my wife's (which are old censored cast offs but don't tell her!).
Sign In or Register to comment.