Bike mounted bike pump

mlgt
mlgt Posts: 366
edited February 2015 in Road buying advice
Been looking at getting a bike pump which can be mounted on my winter bike.

However with varied responses about how much pressure tyres can be pumped up. Wanted to get a varied response to some suggestions before putting the money down.

Style wise I think the Lezyne ones are good, but there are so many versions. Budget wise I dont want to spend more than £25.

Does this make my choices limited? I have a matt black frame.

Thanks in advance. :)
N2 - SW1

Canyon Endurace 9.0
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Comments

  • Cycling plus did a pump review in the latest edition, I think a Birzman came out tops and was that kind of money. You can sometimes pick up a Lezyne Road Drive for that money on sites like Sportspursuit.
  • ai_1
    ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    The Lezyne Road Drive in medium was my choice recently. I just mounted it on the bike and left it at that but I should give it a trial and see how well it works before I come to need it in an event. Certainly in terms of user reviews it's well liked and reportedly is actually able to get you decent road bike tyre pressures. It'll normally be a bit over your budget though unless you get a very good deal.
    Incidentally mine is black (gloss) on a matt black frame. Looks fine.
  • Yeah I've got a road drive too, had it for a couple of years and it works well. A couple of caveats - the screw on head tends to remove Continental inner tube valve cores unless you give them a nip up with a pair of pliers and the o rings on the hose fittings can come adrift and get lost if you're not careful.
  • mlgt
    mlgt Posts: 366
    Thanks for the replies. I agree at £65 for the carbon vs the cheaper version which is the mini version at £27.

    I would (dare I say it) havent had the need for a pump (until the last few weeks) where I have had 3 punctures but always been close to a bike shop.
    However walking to SPL cleats in the rain is not fun and part of me wants to try co2.
    N2 - SW1

    Canyon Endurace 9.0
  • ai_1
    ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    mlgt wrote:
    Thanks for the replies. I agree at £65 for the carbon vs the cheaper version which is the mini version at £27.

    I would (dare I say it) havent had the need for a pump (until the last few weeks) where I have had 3 punctures but always been close to a bike shop.
    However walking to SPL cleats in the rain is not fun and part of me wants to try co2.
    I've only ever needed my pump a handful of times in 4 years (5 punctures in 4 years IIRC) but the point is when you need it, you need it.
    In my view CO2 is not really a replacement for a pump. A pump, a spare tube and a repair kit means you can pretty much always get air in a tube and back on the move, repeatedly if necessary. CO2 will get you back up and running once, maybe 2 or 3 times, depending how many canisters you have, but screw up a repair or inflation or get multiple failures and you could be in trouble. Despite my track record of minimal puncture trouble I still think it's sensible to carry a pump. I so also carry a canister on one of my bikes but this is for optional speed and higher pressure, not a replacement for the pump. Many others will, I'm sure, disagree.
  • dabber
    dabber Posts: 1,937
    I guess this is where we all chip in with our personal favourites...

    I use a Lenzyne Pressure Drive (frame mounted). Small enough to put in back pocket if necessary (but I personally don't) and capable of getting a reasonable pressure into the tyres. I like the fact that it has a screw on extension tube.

    Same comments about the o-rings and Continental inner tubes as mentioned on the other Lenzyne model.
    “You may think that; I couldn’t possibly comment!”

    Wilier Cento Uno SR/Wilier Mortirolo/Specialized Roubaix Comp/Kona Hei Hei/Calibre Bossnut
  • crankycrank
    crankycrank Posts: 1,830
    I would agree with Ai_1 about the CO2. It's certainly easier to use but about half of the people I've loaned my pump out to on the road are riders who have run out of canisters, sometimes 3 or 4 of them when they find out their patched or spare tube failed due to not finding the object that caused the flat in the first place (it happens to just about everyone eventually). The other half didn't bother to bring a pump.
  • slowbike
    slowbike Posts: 8,498
    My suggestions would be to get a pump with

    1) a built in pressure gauge - at least that way you know how much more you need to pump
    2) capable of higher pressure than you need (eg 160psi for road) - as it'll be easier to get it up to pressure

    IMHO CO2 is fine for the odd occasion - ie when you're in a hurry - but I wouldn't rely on that as my only means of inflation.
  • ai_1
    ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    Slowbike wrote:
    My suggestions would be to get a pump with

    1) a built in pressure gauge - at least that way you know how much more you need to pump
    2) capable of higher pressure than you need (eg 160psi for road) - as it'll be easier to get it up to pressure

    IMHO CO2 is fine for the odd occasion - ie when you're in a hurry - but I wouldn't rely on that as my only means of inflation.
    1) Nice to have but I don't remember seeing any compact pumps that I trusted to reach high pressure also equipped with a gauge. However, I think Lezyne do an optional extra hose that contains a pressure indicator. I assume it fits inside the pump in place of the usual hose in which case I might consider it if it's not too expensive. Otherwise, I could live without.
    2)When it comes to mini-pumps, there's VERY few that actually seem capable of realistically reaching the pressures they advertise. A few are rated to 160psi and the Lezyne is one, butI'll still be surprised if it's not hard work getting over 100psi, nevermind anywhere near 160. Must give it a try so I'll actually know what I'm talking about!
  • Coach H
    Coach H Posts: 1,092
    You are on a Winter Bike so you need something reliable that will pump as fast as possible so your riding mates don't freeze to death (you will be warm enough due to thrashing away at your low volume mini-pump). CO2 is no good as the valve can freeze in cold/wet conditions (open normally, which just lets all the gas back out again!).

    So your options are Frame Pump ideally or IMO a Lezyne Road Drive in LARGE only if your frame geometry makes it difficult for a frame fit pump to be secure. ( I have a medium Road Drive on my best bike but a large on my winter bike)
    Coach H. (Dont ask me for training advice - 'It's not about the bike')
  • My Topeak Race Rocket is brilliant at renoving conti, and other make valve cores as well. Its like a tool designed specially for the job.

    The little pumps, including those in the recent magazine test are all rubbish really. The Topeak mentioned above says in its blurb that it will inflate to 160psi. Perhaps if you have arms like a wild gorilla. After 250 pumps you are lucky if you have 70psi.

    Its not rocket science really is it. You are pushing air down a tube into an inner tube. Volume will win every time.

    I carry three canister for inflating. The pump only gets used to put a little sir in to help the refit of the tube, and to find the hole if I need to do a repair.

    If that isnt enough clearly someone is telling me to call a taxi.
  • mlgt
    mlgt Posts: 366
    edited December 2014
    Cheers for the replies again. I guess co2 is nice to have, but the money is on the bump.

    Maybe an idea to get the chain gang to all take burst of 30 seconds to pump up my deflated tyre (haha)
    But noted about the (no exaggeration) 250 pumps to bring it to 70psi

    Still £60 is alot of money for the Lezyne or this pressure drive - http://www.wiggle.co.uk/lezyne-pressure ... mp-medium/ 120 psi

    or a few extra quid - http://www.wiggle.co.uk/lezyne-road-dri ... -abs-pump/ - 160 psi which probably is the more sensible choice.

    However reviews suggest that claimed psi its likely you will reach around half of what is claimed :)
    N2 - SW1

    Canyon Endurace 9.0
  • kajjal
    kajjal Posts: 3,380
    Just don't buy one that is too small or you will need the arms of a gorilla to pump your tyres back up. Also as above make sure it will go above the pressure you need. Short of strapping a full sized track pump to your back most pumps are a compromise of some sort.
  • mercia_man
    mercia_man Posts: 1,431
    What about Zefal HPX frame fit pump? Easy to get pressures of 100 psi and above. Easy to get replacement rubber washers when they wear out. They are a classic and deservedly so. Robust, reliable and efficient. Just measure up the size you need. Widely available for around £20.
  • cycleclinic
    cycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    I use a Topeak frame fit pump normally but the competition tubs I am riding on at present have no threaded washer on them so it difficult to attach any pump without it blowing off. So I carry 3 canisters of CO2 and hope for the best. Normally I use the frame fit pump without issue.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • mlgt
    mlgt Posts: 366
    Cheers for the replies again. I will have a look at the other pumps suggested. I also do want it to look nice on the Canyon :D

    Hence the Leyzne was ticking most of the boxes.
    N2 - SW1

    Canyon Endurace 9.0
  • northpole
    northpole Posts: 1,499
    I have Lezyne Road Drive pumps strapped on my bikes and have found them to be totally dependable and easily capable of delivering decent pressure to complete rides without concern. I don't think you need look any further! Not sure what offers are going at the moment - Ribble have 12% off for the next couple of days on orders £50 and over

    http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/sp/road-t ... ezypumr250

    Peter
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    I have a Topeak Road Morph permanently mounted on the winter bike. Flexible clamp-on hose, little in-line pressure gauge, like a mini track pump in use so it's easy to get road tyres up to pressure. Unfortunately I've had to use it several times in anger but it's been great. The mounting bracket does take the place of a bottle cage, but that's not really an issue on the winter bike.

    Recently bought the cheapest Lezyne pump for the summer bike; small enough for a jersey pocket or mounts under a bottle cage. Flexible hose; yet to see if the screw-on connector removes my valve cores.
  • Blackburn frame pump i've had on my winter/bad weather bike for 9 years - and it still works.
  • passout
    passout Posts: 4,425
    I like my Lezyne mini-pump - good quality, doesn't rattle, works well & still looks good after 6 years. Not sure of model name.
    'Happiness serves hardly any other purpose than to make unhappiness possible' Marcel Proust.
  • mlgt
    mlgt Posts: 366
    I have still yet to purchase a bike pump!

    Has anyone else recently bought a bike pump and want to share their findings?

    Choice is Lezyne Pressure Drive Mini Pump vs Lezyne Road Drive Mini ABS Pump now haha. (omg hes so picky)
    N2 - SW1

    Canyon Endurace 9.0
  • northpole
    northpole Posts: 1,499
    You're nearly past the worst of the p*ncture season!!

    My vote remains firmly as before - Road Drive - have one on each bike and never been let down by them.

    Peter
  • ai_1
    ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    northpole wrote:
    You're nearly past the worst of the p*ncture season!!

    My vote remains firmly as before - Road Drive - have one on each bike and never been let down by them.

    Peter
    Yep, road drive will do the job.

    Afraid to write puncture northpole?
    puncture
    puncture
    puncture
    puncture
    puncture
    puncture
    puncture
    puncture
    puncture

    Now let's see what happens!
  • mlgt
    mlgt Posts: 366
    Ai_1 wrote:
    northpole wrote:
    You're nearly past the worst of the p*ncture season!!

    My vote remains firmly as before - Road Drive - have one on each bike and never been let down by them.

    Peter
    Yep, road drive will do the job.

    Afraid to write puncture northpole?
    puncture
    puncture
    puncture
    puncture
    puncture
    puncture
    puncture
    puncture
    puncture

    LOL. Be careful out there with the slush out there :P

    Thanks I will purchase the road drive on weekend :)

    Now let's see what happens!
    N2 - SW1

    Canyon Endurace 9.0
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Worse? How could it possibly be worse?

    Jehovah
    Jehovah
    Jehovah
    Jehovah
    Jehovah
    Jehovah
  • daniel_b
    daniel_b Posts: 11,766
    No less than ITB recommended the Topeak Race Rocket HP:

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/topeak-race-rocket-hp-master-blaster-mini-pump/
    topeak-race-rocket-hp-med.jpg?w=430&h=430&a=7
    Felt F70 05 (Turbo)
    Marin Palisades Trail 91 and 06
    Scott CR1 SL 12
    Cannondale Synapse Adventure 15 & 16 Di2
    Scott Foil 18
  • Framefit is best (eg. Zefal HPX); those rubbish little mini pumps that take an hour to put not a lot of pressure in your tyre are a bit pointless. Strap it under your top tube. Then buy some better tyres to reduce the frequency of need!
  • ai_1
    ai_1 Posts: 3,060
    Framefit is best (eg. Zefal HPX); those rubbish little mini pumps are a bit pointless. Strap it under your top tube. Then buy some better tyres to reduce the frequency of need!
    I both agree and disagree!
    Most of the mini-pumps are not really up to the job of fully inflating a tyre, certainly not without a lot of hard work. However, in my case they almost never have to. Punctures are a VERY rare occurrence in my last 4 years of cycling.
    A mini pump is very unobtrusive and is good enough to get you going again. If it was a frequent problem I'd endorse getting a more substantial frame pump but I can live with one ride a year when I have to finish on a slightly soft tyre. Most mini-pumps will get you to about 80psi without too much trouble and that's enough to get most people home safely on 25mm tyres - in fact it's not far off what I normally put in the front tyre. I think my new Road Drive will do better than 80psi although I haven't tried it properly yet. I use a track pump at home to set the tyre pressures and a mini-pump is fine in an emergency on the road.
  • Ai_1 wrote:
    Framefit is best (eg. Zefal HPX); those rubbish little mini pumps are a bit pointless. Strap it under your top tube. Then buy some better tyres to reduce the frequency of need!
    I both agree and disagree!
    Most of the mini-pumps are not really up to the job of fully inflating a tyre, certainly not without a lot of hard work. However, in my case they almost never have to. Punctures are a VERY rare occurrence in my last 4 years of cycling.
    A mini pump is very unobtrusive and is good enough to get you going again. If it was a frequent problem I'd endorse getting a more substantial frame pump but I can live with one ride a year when I have to finish on a slightly soft tyre. Most mini-pumps will get you to about 80psi without too much trouble and that's enough to get most people home safely on 25mm tyres - in fact it's not far off what I normally put in the front tyre. I think my new Road Drive will do better than 80psi although I haven't tried it properly yet. I use a track pump at home to set the tyre pressures and a mini-pump is fine in an emergency on the road.

    That's a perfectly reasonable way to look at it. I'd argue the case for the framefit, on the basis that a) in the event of a puncture I'd rather be able to get up to decent pressure fairly easily and continue as normal rather than simply limp home, and b) strapped under the downtube it's very unobtrusive, and I don't have to worry about remember it - but I'd agree on viewing it as an emergency measure.
  • timothyw
    timothyw Posts: 2,482
    Ai_1 wrote:
    Framefit is best (eg. Zefal HPX); those rubbish little mini pumps are a bit pointless. Strap it under your top tube. Then buy some better tyres to reduce the frequency of need!
    I both agree and disagree!
    Most of the mini-pumps are not really up to the job of fully inflating a tyre, certainly not without a lot of hard work. However, in my case they almost never have to. Punctures are a VERY rare occurrence in my last 4 years of cycling.
    A mini pump is very unobtrusive and is good enough to get you going again. If it was a frequent problem I'd endorse getting a more substantial frame pump but I can live with one ride a year when I have to finish on a slightly soft tyre. Most mini-pumps will get you to about 80psi without too much trouble and that's enough to get most people home safely on 25mm tyres - in fact it's not far off what I normally put in the front tyre. I think my new Road Drive will do better than 80psi although I haven't tried it properly yet. I use a track pump at home to set the tyre pressures and a mini-pump is fine in an emergency on the road.

    That's a perfectly reasonable way to look at it. I'd argue the case for the framefit, on the basis that a) in the event of a puncture I'd rather be able to get up to decent pressure fairly easily and continue as normal rather than simply limp home, and b) strapped under the downtube it's very unobtrusive, and I don't have to worry about remember it - but I'd agree on viewing it as an emergency measure.

    A note of caution on this, framefit pumps (particularly on winter/wet bikes) can get exposed to a lot of water and shite, which can leave them useless when you come to need them. I commute five days a week and carry my pumps (yes, I carry two) in my rucksack, having learned the hard way.

    If you're going to frame mount make sure you check the pump before you set off on a long solo ride!