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L'eroica Britannia 2015

I would really like to ride this event this year but I don't currently have a pre-1987 bike and I am looking to get hold of one ahead of the event.

I have been looking on the website for some guidelines on what stipulations there are for the types of bike that can be used but I cant find anything? I did read somewhere that the shifter have to be on the downtube but I'm not sure where I read that now.

If anybody on here would be able to shed some light on this it would be handy as I am currently scouring ebay for a bike to use but I don't want to buy the wrong type of bike.

Thanks in adavance.

Posts

  • peteb0peteb0 Posts: 58
    I've been looking at this recently as I'm planning on restoring a bike for my wedding and L'eroica would be a nice 'other' use for it

    http://www.eroicabritannia.co.uk/file/rules article 5 should give you what you need to know.
  • Thank You.

    That is exactly what I needed. I now need to find an affordable bike.
  • cubedeancubedean Posts: 670
    I was going to consider this but the rules are far to stringent to allow entry with my Gios. :shock:
  • My local bike shop is Cadence Sport which is run by Adrian Timmis and he has his 1987 Peugeot that he rode the Tour de France on hanging in the window.

    I wonder if he would let me borrow it for the weekend?
  • Pre-1987? Weren't most shifters on th downtube back then? Apart from some CXers with the bar end shifters I seem to remember they were all downtube shifters for road bikes. My main road bike is a little bit too young for that at about 21/22 years.

    My local bike shop used to be a main Raleigh dealer way back and they now have a Raleigh bike museum in the basement. The owner even got one of those 100 limited edition centennary Raleigh bikes in gold paintwork, A piece of work. That guy has loads of bikes that would make 1987 bikes look young and modern.
  • You could always hire one?

    I think there is a recognised vintage bike hire company associated with the event - not sure what they are called, but they are local to the Peaks.

    Yes - They're called Glory Days

    http://glorydays.org.uk/

    I must admit though, a nice vintage bike would be my next n+1 if I had room!
  • Thanks for the link.

    I have had a look but it looks like all of their bikes are already rented out for L'eroica.
  • Now open...

    Interestingly the price dropped from 70 to 60 pounds, BUT this no longer includes free camping, which has to be bought separately at 60 pounds. So it's 120 to censored in a portaloo and god knows how much you want to censored on ceramic... glad to see they found another stream of revenue... :?
  • dtddtd Posts: 1
    Did it last year and it really was a great weekend.
    Price is a bit more this year with the separate payment for parking and camping and Festival entry.

    The Brian Rourke I rode last year is available at popular prices – PM me if you're interested.
  • I've just booked for the ride and camping with the family.

    With regards to the cost, you could easily pay £20 per night to camp in the Peaks and not in the centre of Bakewell without the bands etc. so £60 is reasonable and this is for up to 4 adults.

    £130 for a weekend away for a family of 4 is good value in my opinion (kids both under 12). It's cheaper than the amount I paid for the Steel Stage festival at High Bradfield for the tour last year.

    I guess that its the experience that you pay for and this isn't just a bog standard sportive that isn't any different to riding with your mates on roads that are free all year.
  • Wardster00 wrote:
    I've just booked for the ride and camping with the family.

    With regards to the cost, you could easily pay £20 per night to camp in the Peaks and not in the centre of Bakewell without the bands etc. so £60 is reasonable and this is for up to 4 adults.

    £130 for a weekend away for a family of 4 is good value in my opinion (kids both under 12). It's cheaper than the amount I paid for the Steel Stage festival at High Bradfield for the tour last year.

    I guess that its the experience that you pay for and this isn't just a bog standard sportive that isn't any different to riding with your mates on roads that are free all year.

    If you think it's good value, fine... my point was that last year for 70 pounds they offered ride + camping, while now the same combo is 120... I can smell a rat and I am not a big fun of cycling events ran for profit, as they fall into the "entertainment" category, which rarely offers value for money.

    120 only buys you a pitch for a tent + the entry for the ride for one person, that's going to be a small fraction of the cost of the weekend.
    Anyhow, a similar event ran in Belgium (Retroronde) charges around 15 Euro entry fee and B&Bs in the area are not overly expensive and of course offer a bit more comfort than a tent in a field with some plastic toilets (and breakfast included). Even factoring in the ferry, it would be cheaper than doing the Eroica Britannia for me. So, whilst I am attracted by the idea, I can't quite get myself to enter it, knowing there are better alternatives that will end up costing the same or less.
  • I agree with your point regarding how much more expensive the UK seems to be compared to European events and you are probably right as this has now become an entertainment event with bands on all weekend etc.

    I am pretty sure that there will be a lot of non-cyclists just paying the camping fee to enjoy the festival after reading all of the excellent reviews in the mainstream press last year. If this is the case, £60 for a weekend festival is good value if you look at it as entertainment.
  • There are some very strict rules and they are enforced in the UK.

    Here they are:

    18th January 2015

    The 10 Commandments.

    Eroica Britannia 'The Great British Adventure' is hosted on the 19th-21st June. The ride is on Sunday 21st June 2015.

    1. Heroic bikes will only be permitted
    Road racing bikes built before 1987 both with gears and without gears.

    2. Heroic reproduction bikes will only be permitted
    Steel frame new construction with vintage look and characteristics may be used if they are assembled using vintage components or replicated parts similar to the original. No mountain bikes or modern racing bikes.

    3. Pedals with toe clips and straps. Quick release are NOT allowed apart from Cinelli M71

    4. Brake cables must pass outside the handlebars but other cables can pass inside the frame

    5. Wheels must have at least 32 spokes laced to a low profile rim. 20 mm depth or less, except for the wood rims

    6. Both tubular and clinchers with inner tubes are allowed

    7. Participants with disabilities with specific bikes will be OK to take part as long as they make a specific request to the organisation at the time of registration.

    8. Specific authentic bikes such as Pashley Guvnors, Speed 5s, Moulton and Bromptons can enter the 30 mile and 55 mile routes. These bikes are not encouraged for the 100 mile route.
    Other bikes such as military, postman and delivery bikes are allowed for the 30 and 50 mile routes.

    9. Participants must be dressed in vintage or era specific clothing

    10. Helmets are not compulsory but please read the Terms and Conditions for more information

    These are the 10 commandments for rider entry.


    My '51 Sun currently falls foul or rule 5. I really need to change the rims.
  • crvfrcrvfr Posts: 23
    I was hoping to enter this, but so far haven't been able to find any accommodation available in Bakewell. I'm a bit too long in the tooth for camping, but so far the nearest accommodation I can find is in Chesterfield.
  • I have done the real Eroica in Tuscany 3 times. They don't really enforce any of the rules... it's up to you to comply... if you show up with a full suspension MTB they might object, but I doubt they will stop you riding... you would just look like an idiot and probably won't be featured in the photo album.

    The 10 commandments of the UK Eroica seem totally absurd. One step too far... next thing you'll have to register the bike to enter... bad taste, really
  • So you could have a bike from 1987 but not be allowed to ride it even if it has authentic Look pedals and genuine concealed brake cables from that year.
  • I have done the real Eroica in Tuscany 3 times. They don't really enforce any of the rules... it's up to you to comply... if you show up with a full suspension MTB they might object, but I doubt they will stop you riding... you would just look like an idiot and probably won't be featured in the photo album.

    The 10 commandments of the UK Eroica seem totally absurd. One step too far... next thing you'll have to register the bike to enter... bad taste, really

    Have the organisers done something to upset you?

    So far, it's too expensive and the rules are absurd.
  • mpattsmpatts Posts: 1,010
    I have thrown a child like huff with "4. Brake cables must pass outside the handlebars but other cables can pass inside the frame" I have always wrapped my cables under my bar tape - including on my 1978 raleigh Ti. But apparently this renders it unheroic.

    To me, I get the point of it all but I'm damned if I'm going to listen to someone sucking their teeth because "Ooo look, that's a 1979 bottle cage and that's clearly a 1978 frame. Oh and look, the campag gruppo is actually from 1976. Pah!"
    Insert bike here:
  • nochekmatenochekmate Posts: 3,460
    If last year's terrific event is anything to go by, nobody will really be 'enforcing' the rules as such. I don't think everybody in my group obeyed all of the 'rules' on the day itself - I know that my outfit was not quite of the correct vintage (Colnago Mapei, slightly later than 1987 I believe) but that didn't stop us having a fine day out.

    Weather was fantastic, food and drink was terrific and a large amount of Pimms sitting in the scenic setting of Chatsworth House took some beating.

    I'm riding again this year (and I think that my bike is post 1987 with Dura-Ace 7400 G/set but I will fit it out with downtube shifters for the event). My fear is that last year's experience may not be beaten - but this year I'm opting to do the 100 mile ride.
  • nochekmate wrote:
    If last year's terrific event is anything to go by, nobody will really be 'enforcing' the rules as such. I don't think everybody in my group obeyed all of the 'rules' on the day itself - I know that my outfit was not quite of the correct vintage (Colnago Mapei, slightly later than 1987 I believe) but that didn't stop us having a fine day out.

    Weather was fantastic, food and drink was terrific and a large amount of Pimms sitting in the scenic setting of Chatsworth House took some beating.

    I'm riding again this year (and I think that my bike is post 1987 with Dura-Ace 7400 G/set but I will fit it out with downtube shifters for the event). My fear is that last year's experience may not be beaten - but this year I'm opting to do the 100 mile ride.

    That's exactly the point... it's good to make an effort in the spirit of the event, but I think the "ten commandments" sounds way too patronising and not at all inclusive. I am pretty sure they won't enforce them, but then what's the point in publishing them?
  • mpattsmpatts Posts: 1,010
    I just think the ten commandments is a load of unnecessary ponce.
    Insert bike here:
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    It all sounds very British doesn't it: Take one great idea from abroad...add in a huge price to start with and then ratchet it up year on year (not forgetting to obfuscate the pricing so one year cannot be readily compared to the next), define/publish some very strict rules (just to ensure there is no fear of fun creeping into proceedings) and then on the day roll out the enforcers (suitably trained in H&S) armed with clipboards, rulers, back catalogues and the great British spirit of "rules are rules". Oh, how we like to enjoy ourselves.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,774
    I think I got it all wrong about Eroica Britannia. For nearly two years I have done nothing but criticising it (price, attitude, the lot... ) when in fact the organisers have put together what seems an amazing event... there you go Ugo, shut the fucx up!
    What I failed to realise is that even across Europe most bicycle gatherings are now priced along the lines of the Eroica Britannia... 50 Euro is the norm, often more.

    I am planning to do Eroica Hispania next year, but might fit the Britannia too, if I have some spare pennies
  • Wardster00Wardster00 Posts: 143
    Fair play to you Ugo for admitting that you were wrong.

    Of all of the other Eroica events, I must admit that the Hispania event looks amazing.

    I will be back in Bakewell next year.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,774
    Wardster00 wrote:
    Fair play to you Ugo for admitting that you were wrong.

    Of all of the other Eroica events, I must admit that the Hispania event looks amazing.

    I will be back in Bakewell next year.

    Well, I did the long ride of the Eroica Britannia yesterday. The course is very nice and it's great to see a lot of folks with all sorts of weird and wonderful machines tackling the steep roads of the Peak District. However, the festival is by and large a money making machine, disjoint from the rides and which has no appeal whatsoever to me... OK, the field was muddy and one could hardly walk across it, but even had it been dry, it's just a grass field with lots of vendors, you can replicate the experience at Camden Locks without having to queue half an hour for a pricey ticket. Not even sure the local community benefits, as the vendors of food and drinks were so many that cafes and restaurants in town were half empty.

    Let's not forget we paid 60 pounds for an entry: the food stations along the ride started very promising, with espresso and bacon rolls in Tideswell but eventually degraded to boxes of Mr Kipling mini apple pies at the Railway Junction... the "real local food" promise was only partially delivered.

    Overall, it's been a very good ride, but I am not here counting the days to next year's event. I think the Retroronde in Oudenaarde trumps the Eroica Britannia by a long mile.
  • I take a different view. I think it's a very large, complex and well organised event and that doesn't come cheap.

    Yes, £60 is a lot of money for the entry fee, and it's non transferable, but I think it's more than £30 to enter the Great North Run half marathon. They have to manage a 13 mile route whereas the L' eroica covers 185 miles. They have about 50000 entrants now whereas I think there were about 4000 in Bakewell. Do the math.


    I can't speak for local businesses but I live in the area and the cafe we normally use was heaving on Saturday morning. A couple we spoke to in that cafe had eaten in a local restaurant the previous night and wanted a recommendation for the next night. Similarly someone else told me that the hotel he had used in the first year had been fully booked this year and last. It's anecdotal but....

    As for local produce..... A Bakewell pudding in each musette, a bottle of Thornbridge beer at the end, local produced cakes and fancies available at Eyam. And I think there was beer available at the Thornbridge Hall itself.

    These events must take a huge amount of effort to get off the ground and the numbers need to add up. But the intangibles were also in place in my view..... The atmosphere amongst the riders, the way locals turned out to support, help and encourage, and the very pleasant people who manned race HQ. Priceless.

    I am looking forward to next year.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,774

    These events must take a huge amount of effort to get off the ground and the numbers need to add up. But the intangibles were also in place in my view..... The atmosphere amongst the riders, the way locals turned out to support, help and encourage, and the very pleasant people who manned race HQ. Priceless.

    I am looking forward to next year.

    I do agree the organisation of the ride is very good, but I just don't see how the huge festival fits with the cycling event. A smaller event runs the previous weekend in Oudenaarde in Belgium, around 1000 entrants, maybe a few more... everything revolves around cycling... there is a criterium race the night before for period cycles too. It helps that Oudenaarde = Tour of Flanders, so the heritage is immense, but the bicycle theme is the main one.
    When I arrived in Bakewell on Saturday, around 11 AM, I queued half an hour to get a wrist band that allowed me to get inside and join a smaller queue, among the hundreds of people queuing, 4 or 5 had a bicycle, the others were there for the burgers and the brass bands.

    Among the Eroica franchise events (which are now many from California to Uruguay, Japan, South Africa and Spain), this is the only one that combines a full on festival with the bike ride... obviously it is commercially viable, but it doesn't really do it for me. Instead of a muddy field, it would have been better to have things happening in the town, just like it happens in Oudenaarde, in Gaiole in Chianti etc...
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