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Should I try enduro?

Kerrmit1992Kerrmit1992 Posts: 275
edited November 2014 in MTB general
Hi guys,

With all the hype around enduro riding I was wondering if it would be worth a try for someone who has attempted XC racing but struggles with the endurance? I need a sport to take part in competitively since I stopped playing rugby. I feel like I have no challenges at the moment.

I like the idea of the timed downhill sections but the partially untimed climbs haha.

I have heard however that the downhills are pretty extreme? So my XC bike is useless lol.

If use were to buy a bike for enduro, what would you pick? would you go new or 2nd hand for your first one? I've had a look at the giant trance and I can get a trance 3 for just shy of 2,000 but would need to take it on finance. or I could try and get a 2nd hand one for less than £1000.

Thanks!!!
Craig K

Cheers!
Mountain biking is the bicycle version or rallying, except you don't need a Co-Driver!

Posts

  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    The answer is yes! If you have the itch, go for it. Otherwise you'll never know.

    As for the bike... well. What do you have at the minute? tried any rigs out?
  • Hi,

    I currently have a giant XTC for XC. Don't think it's suitable lol. But I can't afford a £2000 rig at the moment without finance which is why I was swaying towards a 2nd hand rig.

    Thanks
    Craig
    Mountain biking is the bicycle version or rallying, except you don't need a Co-Driver!
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    Go for it. Most of the tracks are fairly tame although there are exceptions (Enduro1 at Greatwood was pretty extreme). Transitions can be fairly tight for time as well at some races so don't go along expecting it to be relaxed.
    As for the bike, anything will do the job (even your XTC) but ideally I would go for something a bit slacker with an emphasis on quality rather than quantity for suspension travel and nice stable geometry and not too heavy. Most races are 25km - 50km long but you still want to be feeling good on the last stage to put in a good performance.
    Most important things are to enjoy yourself, stay relaxed and loose and ride within your limits.
  • Antm81Antm81 Posts: 1,406
    Can't comment on wether you should do enduro but the trance is a good bike, however the trance 3 should be under £1500 and the 2 is just shy of £1900. I'm enjoying the geometry it's fairly slack and I like the 650b wheels, they do roll slightly faster. The weight isn't too bad either with my Large weighing roughly 12.5kg when it arrived.

    If you shop around you may be able to pick up the 2014 model trance with a good discount, I think I've seen the 2014 trance 2 the same as mine for around £1500

    My opinion is a little biased though, both full suss bikes I've owned have been a Trance X and now this one but I enjoy riding them and it's far more capable than me.
  • Hi,

    Thanks for the replies guys!

    I do like giant bikes as that's all I've ever had. Maybe it's because the lbs is a dealer.

    that sounds good. I think I'll certainly look into trying it :-)
    Mountain biking is the bicycle version or rallying, except you don't need a Co-Driver!
  • ilovedirtilovedirt Posts: 5,798
    Bike is up to you really, I'm guessing that since you're based in Scotland, most of your local races will be a bit more gnarly than the ones Rockmonkey is used to ;) See if you can find some of the EWS trails around Glentress, or just try riding the Innerleithen downhill trails. If you can do that on a trail bike, you're in pretty good stead. Some races can be easier than others though, most of the ones I've ridden weren't too bad (Llandegla, Hopton, FOD), but once you start riding the UKGE series and the like, they get a bit tougher.

    Definitely give it a try though, its a LOT of fun!
    Production Privee Shan

    B'Twin Triban 5
  • neilusneilus Posts: 245
    I like to ride up hills, as (within reason) I enjoy the exertion and physical challenge, then i like to bomb down twisty tracks as fast as possible - i guess that qualifies as enduro...? My only advice would be to avoid anything which could be deemed as an out and out xc bike. I have such a bike, a Scott Spark 60 and the 120mm forks really struggle on some of the steeper, root/rockier sections...140mm minimum Id say...
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    I think fork stiffness is more important tha travel. If you can't hold a line because your fork is flexing then you're going to struggle.
    I would avoid the 2014 Trance if you want to race just because the fork flexes badly and has a very poor damper, the odd size steerer makes replacement more expensive than normal because you need a new headset and end up with a fork that you can't sell on to fund the upgrade. The 2015 Trance is a better option and has the same brilliant frame.
    You would be fine to give it a try on your current bike, just ask for an extra gap to the next rider at the start to avoid getting caught on a stage.
  • Hi,

    If I could get a 2014 cheap enough would it be worth considering? Could maybe haggle the price for a fork change lol

    This is actually making me want to go try it now. I've never been near a downhill trail before? Concerns me slightly that I'll just be a mobile chicane lol
    Mountain biking is the bicycle version or rallying, except you don't need a Co-Driver!
  • ilovedirt wrote:
    Bike is up to you really, I'm guessing that since you're based in Scotland, most of your local races will be a bit more gnarly than the ones Rockmonkey is used to ;) See if you can find some of the EWS trails around Glentress, or just try riding the Innerleithen downhill trails. If you can do that on a trail bike, you're in pretty good stead. Some races can be easier than others though, most of the ones I've ridden weren't too bad (Llandegla, Hopton, FOD), but once you start riding the UKGE series and the like, they get a bit tougher.

    Definitely give it a try though, its a LOT of fun!
    I think you're as well to do this first on the bike you've already got just to see if that's the sort of riding you're likely to enjoy. As with everything, some of the Enduro race stages in the Tweed Valley are more difficult than others. But many (with the exception of Caberston) can be done on a hardtail and/or XC bike. My 12 year old son has done several on a Specialized Hardrock. You just need to take it a bit easier or be prepared to get off.

    I enjoy riding these kinds of trails but enduro racing is a different kettle of fish. I've only done the Tweedlove King of the Hill this year and 2013. I'm just not interested in the likes of the SES and other events. But then I also do XC and road biking too.

    Give it a go and then you can decide on whether it's worth basing a bike choice on it.
  • definitely give one a go, they're a huge amount of fun.

    did my first coupe last year for my 40th (mistakenly thinking the vets class would be slower) and will certainly signing up for 4 or 5 this year. the competitive element, nerves, pressure and other competitors really add something to it. on both events last year i was nervous as hell until i completed the first stage and then had an absolute blast the rest of the way round.

    as others have said, try one first before lamping out on a bike specifically. either your current bike or borrow one from a mate. if you enjoy it, then look at spending your pennies.

    as to what to buy, i saw people riding everything from run of the mill hard tails to top end 6inch carbon rigs. any 140-160 travel trail bike would be fine
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    Hi,

    This is actually making me want to go try it now. I've never been near a downhill trail before? Concerns me slightly that I'll just be a mobile chicane lol

    Don't worry about it. If you get a double spacing at the start then you have a minute lead on the rider behind and just ask them to shout if they catch you.
    Everyone has to start somewhere and everyone is there to have fun, it's all very friendly. I doubt you will be the slowest rider there anyway.
    Look out for events like One Industries Mini Enduro which are shorter and less technical than a lot of races. Enduro tracks are rarely full on DH tracks, a lot of the races are at trail centres.
    If you like Giant bikes (I do so I understand why you want to stick with them) take a look at used 2012-2014 Reigns, very good but strangely underrated so yhere are some real bargains around, I would have one of them over a 2014 Trance.
  • ilovedirtilovedirt Posts: 5,798
    sofaboy73 wrote:
    definitely give one a go, they're a huge amount of fun.

    did my first coupe last year for my 40th (mistakenly thinking the vets class would be slower) and will certainly signing up for 4 or 5 this year. the competitive element, nerves, pressure and other competitors really add something to it. on both events last year i was nervous as hell until i completed the first stage and then had an absolute blast the rest of the way round.
    I think that's just a part of any type of racing, but I've found enduro to be a lot more accessible and friendly than dowhill, it's more like the type of riding I (and a lot of others) do day to day. Just a bit of craic with mates.
    Production Privee Shan

    B'Twin Triban 5
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    I found DH racing to be a lot more friendly, possibly because of the time for a chat on the course walk and waiting at the start line. Some races are more friendly than others (BDS is way too serious).
    Enduro does give more riding time
    It's looking like next year full face helmets will be compulsory, if they are then I won't be doing any more. The thought of 20 miles in a full face helmet is not appealing.
  • I'd love to try DH but:

    1. I dont know if i've got the bollocks

    2. I've heard there is not much actual riding time?
    Mountain biking is the bicycle version or rallying, except you don't need a Co-Driver!
  • ilovedirtilovedirt Posts: 5,798
    I'd love to try DH but:

    1. I dont know if i've got the ****

    2. I've heard there is not much actual riding time?

    Depends on the track

    Depends on the uplift, you can sometimes get 10 runs in in practice, which is plenty on most tracks! But then I've been to places where the uplift was censored and I only got four runs all day...
    Production Privee Shan

    B'Twin Triban 5
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    I'd love to try DH but:

    1. I dont know if i've got the ****

    2. I've heard there is not much actual riding time?



    Some races give more riding time than others but races with an uplift are expensive
    You don't need big plums, just confidence, the ability to remember lines, stay relaxed under pressure and know your abilities. You will get to the bottom of the hill fastest if you stay on the bike.
    I love downhill racing when I do well but get really angry with myself when I make mistakes.
  • Well it looks like enduro is expensive too at £45 per race. XC is only £15! Lol
    Mountain biking is the bicycle version or rallying, except you don't need a Co-Driver!
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    Some downhill races are around £70 including uplift. BDS races are around £80 from next year.
    British Cycling aren't supporting enduro next year so that may put up the cost of insurance for organisers.
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