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New commuting fixie time - bullhorns or drops?

crakercraker Posts: 2,060
edited November 2014 in Commuting chat
Just looking at the '15 Langster at Evans. Bullhorns instead of drops.

Now I like drops, is it not a bit of a stretch to get onto the horns? Or is the top tube shorter? I suppose I ought to take one for a test ride.

Of course I'll probably just repair the Raleigh again.

Posts

  • redveeredvee Posts: 11,921
    When I rode with bullhorns I had a slightly shorter stem, about 20mm IIRC.
    I've added a signature to prove it is still possible.
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,550
    I adore the bullhorns on my Paddy Wagon SS - perfect for urban commuting especially because you can haul on the anchors easily when you need to :shock: :wink:
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • EKE_38BPMEKE_38BPM Posts: 5,980
    I'd go for bullhorns on an urban fixie. My fixie frame was a bit too small for me so an 'normal' length stem was fine for me, but I think I'd probably go for a shorter stem if the frame size was otherwise correct.

    On another note, I have taken a tiny, tiny step towards getting my fixie back on the road.
    FCN 3: Raleigh Record Ace fixie-to be resurrected sometime in the future
    FCN 4: Planet X Schmaffenschmack 2- workhorse
    FCN 9: B Twin Vitamin - winter commuter/loan bike for trainees

    I'm hungry. I'm always hungry!
  • Mash Bullhorns on both of mine, I do like the flat sections on the bars, very comfy.
    The path of my life is strewn with cowpats from the devil's own satanic herd.
  • Gonna convert my steel charge cx to a SS in a couple months, was gonna go bullhorn too...does anyone have a set of brake levers on the tops as well as at the end of the bullhorns? Would make it better in traffic no?
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,550
    Gonna convert my steel charge cx to a SS in a couple months, was gonna go bullhorn too...does anyone have a set of brake levers on the tops as well as at the end of the bullhorns? Would make it better in traffic no?

    I only ever ride on the horns - in all conditions
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • Personal preference. Mine is drops (Nitto B115) with a Dirty Harry front brake on the top. Works very nicely for me.

    I'd avoid track drops though.
  • iPeteiPete Posts: 6,076
    Bull horns with a TT bar end brake lever.
  • For me, I've got bullhorn with single crosstop lever for front brake on the fixed gear bike. Good range of hand positions for commuting - can be a bit of stretch depending on the setup but stem length can be shortened if necessary.
  • dyrlacdyrlac Posts: 743
    My massive 100 miles on the fixed thus far entitle me to an opinion surely. Really like the bullhorns (I don't mind a bit of stretch, and frankly could go for more), but find the brakes on the tops (still have both sets) to be an abomination. Happily, though I have some TT levers sitting at home, waiting for me to choose new bar tape/cable outers.
  • EKE_38BPMEKE_38BPM Posts: 5,980
    I had a go on a colleague's bullhorned fixie today. It had a very short stem and a single TT brake lever.
    Apart from the brake being on the right*, I'd say the set-up was about perfect.



    *for a single brake fixie, I think the brake should be on the left so that I can signal right and still use both brakes.
    FCN 3: Raleigh Record Ace fixie-to be resurrected sometime in the future
    FCN 4: Planet X Schmaffenschmack 2- workhorse
    FCN 9: B Twin Vitamin - winter commuter/loan bike for trainees

    I'm hungry. I'm always hungry!
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,550
    I'm really surprised that bullhorn is not more popular. My LBS mate suggested it and I'm so pleased he did. I love my Paddy Wagon (surprised not to see them mentioned more on here). I raced 3 mopeds home on Monday evening - on a steel SS with guards and me in smart shoes, an office shirt and a computer on my back. What a buzz.
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • dhopedhope Posts: 6,699
    I'm really surprised that bullhorn is not more popular. My LBS mate suggested it and I'm so pleased he did. I love my Paddy Wagon (surprised not to see them mentioned more on here). I raced 3 mopeds home on Monday evening - on a steel SS with guards and me in smart shoes, an office shirt and a computer on my back. What a buzz.

    This thread has made me decide to change plans for the Konador (Paddy Wagon frame with Condor parts)
    It's sitting in the kitchen with untaped bars. Think I'll get some bullhorns instead. I've got Campag TT levers lying about already.
    Rose Xeon CW Disc
    CAAD12 Disc
    Condor Tempo
  • So my rose will arrive hopefully in the next 3 weeks and I was planning my SS conversion some time after...

    ...I WANNA DO IT NOW!!!!!!

    Not a good idea. Is it???
  • pastryboypastryboy Posts: 1,385
    Another fan. Was concnered I wouldn't get on with bullhorns after so many years of drops but I really like them.

    At the far end of the horns it feels just as aerodynamic as being on the drops but slightly more comfortable because of stretching out rather than hunching up. Making do with the supplied cross top lever as barely used due to riding fixed.
  • redveeredvee Posts: 11,921
    If anybody wants some bars and levers.

    https://www.dropbox.com/sh/y0sl2qvhmbtn ... qheba?dl=0

    ITM WIng bars 420 c-c, Promax levers with external cable routing.

    £30 posted
    I've added a signature to prove it is still possible.
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 22,150
    Would agree with everyone else really - Bullhorns for urban commuting, Drops for "proper" riding.

    Bear in mind that an urban fixie frame may also not be so good for "proper" rides either. Mine is great in Central London, but I wouldnt want to ride it any significant distance
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • iPeteiPete Posts: 6,076
    ddraver wrote:
    Mine is great in Central London, but I wouldnt want to ride it any significant distance
    Agree but sometimes it's fun to take the urban fixie into the Surrey Hills, you get many double takes powering up Box Hill. :twisted: The Dun Dynamo was a hoot on the fixie too.
    EKE_38BPM wrote:
    *for a single brake fixie, I think the brake should be on the left so that I can signal right and still use both brakes.
    I'm in two minds but have mine on the right currently.
    I don't trust the dexterity in my left hand to deal with smooth modulation and emergency stops.
    The Rookie wrote:
    If you use crosstop levers you could have a lever each side for the one front brake.......
    Interesting, could you have a crosstop on the left attached to a TT lever on the right? Couldn't give up the TT lever.
  • EKE_38BPMEKE_38BPM Posts: 5,980
    iPete wrote:
    EKE_38BPM wrote:
    *for a single brake fixie, I think the brake should be on the left so that I can signal right and still use both brakes.
    I'm in two minds but have mine on the right currently.
    I don't trust the dexterity in my left hand to deal with smooth modulation and emergency stops.
    It'll take a moment or two to get used to it, but you will. Its like riding fixed in general; you try to freewheel a couple of times but soon learn that you can't. Same learning process with swapping the brakes.
    FCN 3: Raleigh Record Ace fixie-to be resurrected sometime in the future
    FCN 4: Planet X Schmaffenschmack 2- workhorse
    FCN 9: B Twin Vitamin - winter commuter/loan bike for trainees

    I'm hungry. I'm always hungry!
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 22,150
    iPete wrote:
    ddraver wrote:
    Mine is great in Central London, but I wouldnt want to ride it any significant distance
    Agree but sometimes it's fun to take the urban fixie into the Surrey Hills, you get many double takes powering up Box Hill. :twisted: The Dun Dynamo was a hoot on the fixie too.

    True, the problem with mine is that the twitchy frame geometry is great for dodging black cabs and accelerating away from lights but for cruising through Esher? Horrible!

    Looks like it's time for a new bike ;)
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • ga02clrga02clr Posts: 97
    edited November 2014
    I ride a Pearson 'Once more into the breach', fixed with drops. I am using it as my main training bike now the weather has turned and also my commuter into town.
    As I have a love for my knees, I enjoy having the front and rear brake option. Unlike some of the cheaper fixed gear/SS options floating round, it has a proper road geometry, takes full guards and a pannier rack if you so choose.
    I enjoy having standard drops on as like the variety on my weekend rides. As someone said above, if you actually hit the inclines properly and do not dawdle, there is no reason not to ride the Surrey Hills. I find I have much more problem keeping up on decent than on the climbs riding fix.
    The other big upside is it prevents you freewheeling and taking it easy, 80 miles fixed in the hills actually feels like a proper work out.

    Thoroughly recommend it. Just make sure you know what your doing before riding with anyone else!
  • debelidebeli Posts: 582
    CAUTION!

    I love my fixed-gear bicycle, but if I could start again I'd leave the drops on it. It was a nice, light, butted531 frame that had been sitting around with very early (primitive) STI levers and a 7-speed block. Unused and unloved in the rafters. I stripped everything off it and went fixed. Along the way, I took a hacksaw to the drops (lovely, pinched into a lovely quill stem) and stuffed (hammered) some tri-levers into the open ends.

    I works OK. I like it. I'd even say I love it and it is just about my favourite bicycle in the right conditions and on the right gradients...

    But I think I'd prefer it on drops. It looks super-fandango and the brakes work splendidly. I can chuck it around and the bars are plenty wide enough to give secure slow-speed steering.... But there is a lingering doubt about the bullhorns.

    Sadly, they haven't yet invented an unhacksaw, so it stays as it is.
  • crakercraker Posts: 2,060
    For me its all about climbing, standing on the pedals with my hands on the horizontal, rear-ward facing bit of the drops. That puts my hands as far forward as the steerer. On the brake hoods is doable, on the tops I don't even try. With bullhorns on the same geometry bike my hands will be forward of where my brake hoods are, perhaps slightly lower.

    So either a bullhorned fixie will be shorter in the top tube or I'd probably prefer drops. Still you don't know if you don't try...

    FWIW my commute isn't through traffic, 10-15 miles through the Welsh Marches.
  • iPeteiPete Posts: 6,076
    Debeli wrote:
    CAUTION!

    I love my fixed-gear bicycle, but if I could start again I'd leave the drops on it. It was a nice, light, butted531 frame that had been sitting around with very early (primitive) STI levers and a 7-speed block. Unused and unloved in the rafters. I stripped everything off it and went fixed. Along the way, I took a hacksaw to the drops (lovely, pinched into a lovely quill stem) and stuffed (hammered) some tri-levers into the open ends.

    I works OK. I like it. I'd even say I love it and it is just about my favourite bicycle in the right conditions and on the right gradients...

    But I think I'd prefer it on drops. It looks super-fandango and the brakes work splendidly. I can chuck it around and the bars are plenty wide enough to give secure slow-speed steering.... But there is a lingering doubt about the bullhorns.

    Sadly, they haven't yet invented an unhacksaw, so it stays as it is.

    Get yourself on LFGSS and look out for some second hand drops.
    The best thing about FGSS is the ability to swap around bars/brakes options like lego.


    Oh and pics of said bike, sounds like a nice build :D
  • iPete wrote:
    Debeli wrote:
    CAUTION!

    I love my fixed-gear bicycle, but if I could start again I'd leave the drops on it. It was a nice, light, butted531 frame that had been sitting around with very early (primitive) STI levers and a 7-speed block. Unused and unloved in the rafters. I stripped everything off it and went fixed. Along the way, I took a hacksaw to the drops (lovely, pinched into a lovely quill stem) and stuffed (hammered) some tri-levers into the open ends.

    I works OK. I like it. I'd even say I love it and it is just about my favourite bicycle in the right conditions and on the right gradients...

    But I think I'd prefer it on drops. It looks super-fandango and the brakes work splendidly. I can chuck it around and the bars are plenty wide enough to give secure slow-speed steering.... But there is a lingering doubt about the bullhorns.

    Sadly, they haven't yet invented an unhacksaw, so it stays as it is.

    Get yourself on LFGSS and look out for some second hand drops.
    The best thing about FGSS is the ability to swap around bars/brakes options like lego.


    Oh and pics of said bike, sounds like a nice build :D

    Or just get yourself over to Velo Solo and order some Nitto B115 drops and a Dirty Harry brake lever.
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