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Moser's son retires at 22

frenchfighterfrenchfighter Posts: 30,642
edited September 2014 in Pro race
He is not getting the results to justify his hard work and has no interest in being a domestique so he has decided to stop. His father respects his decision.

http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/ignazio ... ires-at-22

tumblr_n568l8WO8S1qdw1kro1_1280_zps45f2c508.jpg
Contador is the Greatest

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  • He is not getting the results to justify his hard work and has no interest in being a domestique so he has decided to stop. His father respects his decision.

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/ignazio ... ires-at-22

    tumblr_n568l8WO8S1qdw1kro1_1280_zps45f2c508.jpg

    He might have done better on a more modern bike.
  • bigmatbigmat Posts: 5,127
    I found it a really interesting story. Sounds pretty clued up for 22 - could have maybe forged a career as a domestique but didn't think the sacrifices justified it if he wasn't going to be winning at the top level. Makes a lot of sense.
  • ProssPross Posts: 29,628
    The pressure is always on the children of sporting greats to emulate their parents and it is very rare they actually achieve it. The likes of Axel Merckx and Nico Roche have had decent careers but nowhere near those of their father (especially in Axel's case) and even if they are happy being a domestique someone will always be comparing them.
  • iainf72iainf72 Posts: 15,784
    Things might have been different if he had a helicopter available to him
    Fckin' Quintana … that creep can roll, man.
  • iainf72 wrote:
    Things might have been different if he had a helicopter available to him

    Saucer of milk for Iain...
    @shraap | My Men 2016: G, Yogi, Cav, Boonen, Degenkolb, Martin, J-Rod, Kudus, Chaves
  • With a family business to fall back on perhaps he could have given it a bit longer - unless he really hates it - he doesn't seem to have any burning desire to do something instead just that he isn't enjoying bike racing. At 22 he doesn't really know how far he could go.
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
  • I wouldn't be surprised if he has been racing solid for the last ten years which then makes the decision to quit easier. Focusing on one sport too early is a risk many parents face.
    Contador is the Greatest
  • mm1mm1 Posts: 1,063
    They are mountain / farming people so the vineyards are a bit more than "something to fall back on", not as big a business as local rivals like Cavit, but they've been doing it for 3 generations. Never tried their products www.cantinemoser.com but was told by Vic Haines (sometime sponsor of Graham Obree, who was planning to do the tandem hour record with Francesco) that the sparkling is pretty good.
  • Good luck to him.

    Guess it doesn't matter what everyone else thinks if he just doesn't want it or feels the pressure of living up to a great fathers reputation is too much then so be it.
    Pain hurts much less if its topped off with beating your mates to top of a climb.
  • Sounds more like he's a mama's boy who doesn't like the perpetual living out of a suitcase life.
  • CorianderCoriander Posts: 1,326
    Sounds more like he's a mama's boy who doesn't like the perpetual living out of a suitcase life.

    I don't think you have to be a mamma's boy to not want that sort of life. You couldn't pay me enough to live the life pro cyclists live - all that time away from home, but rarely in the same place for two or even a few nights, extremely limited (in terms of both activity and time) times with friends, not able to plan ahead, constant packing and unpacking, the utter, utter tedium of life on tour (judging by what I've seen), the incredibly limited inputs to your life. I would have to have a passion for cycling beyond my comprehension for the racing and riding to make the life worthwhile.
  • RichN95.RichN95. Posts: 25,499
    Sounds more like he's a mama's boy who doesn't like the perpetual living out of a suitcase life.
    He sounds like someone who has the self awareness to know that he's not really that good (and probably getting by on his name). Given the choice between trying to eek out a living at a continental team or helping to run the family vineyard in Trentino I know which one most sane people would choose.
    Twitter: @RichN95
  • Was going to start a new thread but ultimately cba.

    Any cycling examples of the son being better or more successful than the father?

    Any daughters?
    Believe that a farther shore
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    And cures and healing wells
  • RichN95.RichN95. Posts: 25,499
    edited September 2014
    Any cycling examples of the son being better or more successful than the father?
    Almost all of them. Most cyclists didn't have pro cyclist fathers.

    But if you want one who did - Wiggins. And Kreuziger. And Tony Gallopin. And Dan Martin.
    Twitter: @RichN95
  • inseineinseine Posts: 5,785
    RichN95 wrote:
    Any cycling examples of the son being better or more successful than the father?
    Almost all of them. Most cyclists didn't have pro cyclist fathers.

    But if you want one who did - Wiggins.

    I'll give you two.....the Schlecks!
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,678
    Pendleton vs her father.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,678
    Coriander wrote:
    Sounds more like he's a mama's boy who doesn't like the perpetual living out of a suitcase life.

    I don't think you have to be a mamma's boy to not want that sort of life. You couldn't pay me enough to live the life pro cyclists live - all that time away from home, but rarely in the same place for two or even a few nights, extremely limited (in terms of both activity and time) times with friends, not able to plan ahead, constant packing and unpacking, the utter, utter tedium of life on tour (judging by what I've seen), the incredibly limited inputs to your life. I would have to have a passion for cycling beyond my comprehension for the racing and riding to make the life worthwhile.

    I tour for a living, and believe me it gets very hard. Endless censored hotel rooms and food, long transfers etc.

    If you can't hack that then it is the worst thing in the world.
  • arran77arran77 Posts: 9,260
    sjmclean wrote:
    Coriander wrote:
    Sounds more like he's a mama's boy who doesn't like the perpetual living out of a suitcase life.

    I don't think you have to be a mamma's boy to not want that sort of life. You couldn't pay me enough to live the life pro cyclists live - all that time away from home, but rarely in the same place for two or even a few nights, extremely limited (in terms of both activity and time) times with friends, not able to plan ahead, constant packing and unpacking, the utter, utter tedium of life on tour (judging by what I've seen), the incredibly limited inputs to your life. I would have to have a passion for cycling beyond my comprehension for the racing and riding to make the life worthwhile.

    I tour for a living, and believe me it gets very hard. Endless censored hotel rooms and food, long transfers etc.

    If you can't hack that then it is the worst thing in the world.

    Mama's boy or not, sounds like his heart wasn't in it so he was never going to be great was he, when things are tough in life, whatever they are you've got to be 100% committed to what you do, if not you might as well not bother, he's chosen the not bothering option which is fair enough.
    "Arran, you are like the Tony Benn of smut. You have never diluted your depravity and always stand by your beliefs. You have my respect sir and your wife my pity" :lol:

    seanoconn
  • mm1mm1 Posts: 1,063
    Not sure what the fuss is about, he's simply swaped one family business for another (father and 3 uncles rode as Pros). Never know, he may come back, Gilberto Simione (who is also related) took time out of his racing career during which he worked at Cicli Moser in Gardalo.
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