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Touring Books

tangled_metaltangled_metal Posts: 3,996
edited September 2014 in Tour & expedition
Can anyone recommend any good books on cycle touring? Either advice on how to do it or good books on routes. I used to backpack and there's a really good book on UK walking trails. Is there something similar for cycle touring? I'm new to it and like to read up a bit before taking the plunge with my first tour.

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  • simonheadsimonhead Posts: 1,399
    There are probably hundreds, i have certainly seen a few on Amazon etc. Not a how to do it but Tom the guy that did the round the world trip (he is often on here) is worth a read. Really depends where you are looking to go if you are after routes but there is one book called something like "the cycle tourists handbook" that is pretty decent.
    Life isnt like a box of chocolates, its like a bag of pic n mix.
  • hdowhdow Posts: 146
    Where are you thinking of going?

    Often guide books will include useful info on what to take & how to set your bike up that is specific to the area covered. Expect info on accommodation and quirky cycle related laws.

    HarryD
  • I am new to touring having really only done day rides and commuting. I am looking for ideas on shorter, weekend or extended weekend routes in Britain. Routes that I can use as a trial of gear, technique (loading, etc.?) and whether it really suits me. I also would like a book that gives good ideas and pointers for different types of touring (fully self supported camping trips, hostel or B&B trips, etc). I would like to go touring for a week or two next summer in Europe so I want to get some trips in this year.

    I have heard of a good route up the east coast of England/Scotland called the coast and castles route (or similar) for example. If there is a single book offering details of routes around the country. Kind of like the Cicerone National Trails Handbook for walking routes.
    http://www.cicerone.co.uk/product/detai ... A73kPldXhA

    Two types of book, route guides (multiple routes) and advice/handbooks.
  • hdowhdow Posts: 146
    Have a look at the Cicerone website for their cycling books. They have a number of guides covering various parts of the UK that include day rides as well as tours. They also publish several guides for cycle tours in Europe. Cotswold usually stock them so go & have a browse or Amazon usually lets you have a "look inside".

    If you've backpacked in the past then cycle touring is not that different. Wheels not boots
  • Cicerone? Might have to give them a call and drop round. They are 10 minutes away from me and they are very friendly. I've bought books direct before in their regular book sales. They also sell new or first quality copies directly before now.

    Might have to pop round again one Friday. I once bought 4 or 5 books for £20 including fairly newly released books at the time like Moveable Feasts. That one is a good food book for those backpackers, cycle tourers and adventure racers. Full of recipes, tips and advice on food and nutrition. If you are ever heading up the A6 north of Lancaster, say on the LEJOG, and are passing Milnethorpe during office hours and want some reading material for your next trip then they are worth visiting. Just better if in a car so you don't have to carry the books you buy!!
  • For the 'how do it' bit of your question I've found these two books useful.
    Long Distance Cyclists' Handbook
    http://www.foyles.co.uk/witem/sport-hob ... 0713668322
    Adventure Cycle-Touring Handbook
    http://www.foyles.co.uk/witem/sport-hob ... 1905864256
  • the "coasts and castles" is a Sustrans route. If your looking for something more than cycling from your front door i'd go straight to Sustrans http://www.sustrans.org.uk/ncn/map/themed-routes-0/long-distance-rides. I've always fancied the Hadrians cycleway and the West Country way. Up in Scotland, the Great Glen way also looks fantastic.
    That should give you plenty to go at......!
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