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Upgrade Help

littlerascallittlerascal Posts: 40
edited September 2014 in Road buying advice
Hi

I have a Bianchi Nirone 7 road bike and I am looking at buying a set of 3T handlebars and a stem but looking for some advice.

Will the below ones fit and any advice you can give would be greatly appreciated

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/3t-aeronova-tea ... andlebars/
http://www.wiggle.co.uk/3t-integra-team ... min-mount/

Thanks

Kevin

Posts

  • PhilbyPhilby Posts: 328
    They should fit. But the immediate question I had when I saw your post is why you would want to spend the best part of £350 'upgrading' with expensive bars and stem when even the top of the range Via Nirone costs less than £1200. I have an Alu/carbon Via Nirone, which I really enjoy riding, but would suggest that spending that sort of money on new bars and stem would seem disproportionate for the amount of benefit you are likely to get. If you've not done so already, upgrading the fairly basic wheelset and tyres that they come with would provide significantly more benefit. The other potential upgrade would be the brakes.

    Anyway it's your money to do whatever you want with!
  • CalpolCalpol Posts: 1,039
    Philby wrote:
    They should fit. But the immediate question I had when I saw your post is why you would want to spend the best part of £350 'upgrading' with expensive bars and stem when even the top of the range Via Nirone costs less than £1200. I have an Alu/carbon Via Nirone, which I really enjoy riding, but would suggest that spending that sort of money on new bars and stem would seem disproportionate for the amount of benefit you are likely to get. If you've not done so already, upgrading the fairly basic wheelset and tyres that they come with would provide significantly more benefit. The other potential upgrade would be the brakes.

    Anyway it's your money to do whatever you want with!

    To be honest that's exactly my thoughts. Wheels and tyres are a far better first upgrade particularly if its the orginal Reparto Corse Bianchi stuff. Carbon bars won't make you faster, wheels might and new tyres might make the ride smoother.
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    £140 on a stem, FFS.

    As above, forget these two pointless purchases. Tyres then wheels although at this time of year I would be tempted with something like a Gabba.
  • Thanks guys

    Any suggestions on wheel sets to get/avoid?
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    The responses can be more helpful if you outline what it is you are looking for from your upgrade.

    For instance, if you want race quality tyres and have £100 for the pair, but will accept a trade off in durability and puncture protection, then you will get suggestions for that. If you want good all rounder tyres to ride in all weathers but don't want to spend more that £50 the pair then you can get some suggestions for that.

    Most people want a race tyre that is super quick, very light, great durability, decent puncture proofing and cheap. They are the tricky ones to answer :)

    Same goes for wheels really, it helps if you outline what kind of riding do you do (hilly, racing, TT'ing) and what are you looking for from your new wheels (lighter? more durable? faster?) and some idea of your typical avg speed is useful, because aero only really gets effective above 20mph. Also, some wheels have a total weight limit, typically 90-100kg, so you need to be honest about that (but not the avg speed because everyone lies about that :wink: ).

    So, if you are 110kg, ride at 15mph and only ever do flat rides of 20 miles but in all weathers then the response will be different to a 65kg hill climber who only does hill TTs in the summer.

    My comment about the Gabba (for example) wasn't just tongue in check. If you are new to riding and want to improve then the best way is to ride regularly throughout the rubbish weather (although avoid ice at all costs) so decent autumn/winter kit is not a luxury item. For some, they decide it is better to spend some money on a turbo trainer at this time of year and then £300 on some new wheels/tyres in the spring.

    btw, my vote for all round tyres that are relatively quick/light, reasonably priced and fairly durable are Schwalbe Ultremo DDs.
  • Thanks for your reply.

    I am not into racing or TT as I just go out on the bike for exercise and fitness.

    I would like wheels that are perhaps a bit more aero due to the Scottish weather but also durability as I don't want to have to replace them due to the numerous hazards the roads have.

    Tyres, - I will have a look at the ones you want as I have Schwalbe on my CX and found them smooth and durable

    My average speed is between 15 - 22 mph and I weigh 12,8, mileage ranges from 11 miles if I'm going to visit folks or 45 if I'm going out for a few hours.
  • I just go out on the bike for exercise and fitness.

    Always tickles me (Not a dig - I am the same) that we say we want excercise then start spending money making the bike lighter. If we really want the excercise we should be on something like http://www.parkersofbolton.co.uk/p-4601 ... speed.aspx

    Anyway, decent all round wheels? Look at something like a set of handbuilt wheels like Utegra hubs, archetype rims. Built up with 32 spokes in each wheel you will have a nice solid set of wheels that let the tyre work better, be nice and comfortable and very robust. On the off chance a spoke does fail, any bike shop should have a replacement in stock and be able to fit it. About £300 and will be transferrable if you change bike,

    Paul.
    Giant Defy 2
    Large bloke getting smaller :-)
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,385
    I am not into racing or TT as I just go out on the bike for exercise and fitness.

    If so, what were you expecting to get out of the new bar & stem purchase..?
  • dombhoydombhoy Posts: 147
    i would get a pair of campagnolo zondas
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    I would like wheels that are perhaps a bit more aero due to the Scottish weather but also durability as I don't want to have to replace them due to the numerous hazards the roads have.

    Ermm, so aero wheels usually have deeper rims and specifically help riders above 20mph. They are usually heavier than shallow rims because of the extra material, although some nice carbon tubulars can be lighter than more solid shallow wheels with chunky hubs...but decent aero carbon tubs which handle crosswinds are expensive. TBH though, I think you may have confused the term aero. I mean it in that a wheel has aerodynamic advantages when going forwards, I think you want a decent wheel that copes with strong winds and censored weather??

    Can you outline what kind of terrain is typical: hilly, undulating or flat? Also, what do you think it wrong with your current wheels? If they are worn out and want a £300 quid set that are durable, good all rounders, easily rebuilt/fixed but not that bling then the suggestion above about handbuilts is spot on...but your stem and bar choice was very bling so maybe looks are more preferred over practicality? If so, factory wheels are the way to go...but at the cost of easy/cheap rebuilds...think Zondas, as above too: Great vfm, look good, reasonable weight yet fairly durable but once the rims are worn out or a spoke pops then you will be in trouble.
  • The Zondas or the Fulcrum Quattro's are both worth a look.

    This time of the year I'd be thinking about a turbo trainer too, if you don't already have one.
    It is f'king dire out there at the moment.
    Or mudguards and lights... and some waterproofs. :mrgreen:
  • Imposter wrote:
    I am not into racing or TT as I just go out on the bike for exercise and fitness.

    If so, what were you expecting to get out of the new bar & stem purchase..?

    Looking at changing my handlebars as I don't like the ones the bianchi has, I like the idea of the bar being flatter as opposed to round as I tend to rest my hands as opposed to grip

    The 3T ones caught my eye and reviews were good.
  • The Zondas or the Fulcrum Quattro's are both worth a look.

    This time of the year I'd be thinking about a turbo trainer too, if you don't already have one.
    It is f'king dire out there at the moment.
    Or mudguards and lights... and some waterproofs. :mrgreen:

    Yeah got a turbo trainer but quite like cycling in the winter unless its raining/icy. I quite like the cold
  • Bobbinogs wrote:
    I would like wheels that are perhaps a bit more aero due to the Scottish weather but also durability as I don't want to have to replace them due to the numerous hazards the roads have.

    Ermm, so aero wheels usually have deeper rims and specifically help riders above 20mph. They are usually heavier than shallow rims because of the extra material, although some nice carbon tubulars can be lighter than more solid shallow wheels with chunky hubs...but decent aero carbon tubs which handle crosswinds are expensive. TBH though, I think you may have confused the term aero. I mean it in that a wheel has aerodynamic advantages when going forwards, I think you want a decent wheel that copes with strong winds and censored weather??

    Can you outline what kind of terrain is typical: hilly, undulating or flat? Also, what do you think it wrong with your current wheels? If they are worn out and want a £300 quid set that are durable, good all rounders, easily rebuilt/fixed but not that bling then the suggestion above about handbuilts is spot on...but your stem and bar choice was very bling so maybe looks are more preferred over practicality? If so, factory wheels are the way to go...but at the cost of easy/cheap rebuilds...think Zondas, as above too: Great vfm, look good, reasonable weight yet fairly durable but once the rims are worn out or a spoke pops then you will be in trouble.

    Terrain varies depending on my route but I would say elevation is around 500 - 1000ft, roads only so you can imagine the roads are sometimes smooth but sometimes well ran giving in small pot holes and gravel

    Im looking for something that will be light, durable and reliable

    Bit cautious over rims that require tubular tyres due to the rumours of these being puncture friendly
  • dombhoy wrote:
    i would get a pair of campagnolo zondas

    Had a look at those, nice price as it would let me get new tyres and a spare and also other bits and bobs.
  • keezxkeezx Posts: 1,316
    If so, what were you expecting to get out of the new bar & stem purchase..?

    Looking at changing my handlebars as I don't like the ones the bianchi has, I like the idea of the bar being flatter as opposed to round as I tend to rest my hands as opposed to grip

    The 3T ones caught my eye and reviews were good.[/quote]

    Lots of good bars out there with flat top for 25-35 quid, nothing wrong with such an upgrade.
    The form/ergonomics of handlebars are certainly important, but the prize of that TTT is rediculous.
  • Hi Keezx

    I suppose I am looking at expensive ones to then compare against cheaper ones, very little research done so far, just the 3t ones caught my eye when i searched 3T on wiggle as i bought a top.
  • Well after some research I have now purchased a pair of Campagnolo Bullet 50 Carbon Clincher Wheelset and will be buying a pair of GP4000's to go with them.

    Money spent a couple of months early but might get some use out of them this year before it gets too icy for the road bike and the CX will come out

    Many thanks for those who guided me on this, sure I will have plenty more questions.
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