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resignations over Rotherham scandal

mamba80mamba80 Posts: 5,032
edited September 2014 in The cake stop
Should these people resign or stay put in their new roles?
Particularly Sean Wright, head of Police commission now and a council big wig at the time of the alleged abuses took place.

I m not sure, after all, he and the others in charge at the time, would only go onto another high powered job and after all, maybe he will try to make amends, after all, he should know what went wrong :roll:

what ever happens now, the abuse cannot be undone and the victims lives are for ever blighted.

Please no racial slurs, its a huge topic and worthy of reasoned debate.

Posts

  • mr_goomr_goo Posts: 3,755
    Whilst I cannot agree enough about pursuing those in authority that turned a blind eye. As stated in my OP on this forum. It seems that the focus of the investigation is centred around the failings of those involved, social services, police, labour party etc etc.
    There is absolutely no mention of any criminal investigation to arrest and prosecute the evil perpetrators of these heinous crimes.
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  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 7,639
    Mr Goo wrote:
    There is absolutely no mention of any criminal investigation to arrest and prosecute the evil perpetrators of these heinous crimes.
    Actually some of them have been convicted.

    But there is a good reason for the emphasis on the bigwigs - you will probably prevent more crime in the future if you demolish the culture and environment that made crime such an easy option.
  • Mikey23Mikey23 Posts: 5,306
    Which of course we are not allowed to mention in case we are being politically insentitive or racist. One of the main reasons why these horrendous crimes were allowed to continue for so long in the first place in my humble opinion. And why they are probably happening right now in many other places close to us. Far easier to pick out a convenient scapegoat or two, assuage our collective conscience and move on to a less challenging story. Rank hypocrisy of course but the way the world works...
  • Mikey23Mikey23 Posts: 5,306
    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfre ... -rotherham

    Probably says it more eloquently than i could
  • GiraffotoGiraffoto Posts: 2,078
    To respond to the OP, yes, they should go. They're occupying positions where the public's trust is of paramount importance, and now they're demonstrating that they don't think that what happened on their watch is their fault (or even if it is their fault, that it's not that big a deal that it is). So: Level of Trust = 0
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  • I'd suggest that (if interested) you try listening to the BBC Radio Sheffield breakfast show with Toby Foster (tune in radio app or something similar should do it). He's been at the council and police for days and he ain't letting it drop. He's obviously got the bit between his teeth and he's giving em hell.
    It's interesting to get a "local" perspective and to hear some of the idiots trying to wriggle out of any responsibility for what's gone on.
    Still thinking of something clever to say!
  • To put it bluntly they should start interviewing every official starting at the point in 2002 where the researcher who highlighted this problem to the police, council and social services and ask them what direct action they took coming out of that meeting. If they cannot find positive action that achieved a result then that individual should go or face disciplinary action.

    It beggars belief that in 2005 they were training Councillors on the issue and then these guys are claiming that either they did not know the scale of the problem or chose to do very little hard action against it and in all cases up to this report appear to have played down the problem at all times. Why would you be trained on an issue if it did not affect your area. Lack of critical question asking her I think.

    If you read the full report then it is shocking the breadth and depth of the cover up and quite frankly people should be taking responsibility and this should start at the police in 2002 when they told the researcher she was wrong and that if she did not modify her report then it would damage her personally. In this case the researcher had the backbone to send this report off to higher powers without modifying it.
  • bompington wrote:
    Mr Goo wrote:
    There is absolutely no mention of any criminal investigation to arrest and prosecute the evil perpetrators of these heinous crimes.
    Actually some of them have been convicted.

    But there is a good reason for the emphasis on the bigwigs - you will probably prevent more crime in the future if you demolish the culture and environment that made crime such an easy option.

    This is true but the culture and environment that made this possible is not just the culture of the that council/police/social workers who let it go on - it's also the culture of the perpetrators. So yes go after the bigwigs but also recognise that there was a cultural element to the offending irrespective of that. It's that culture of the offenders that it seems to be taboo to mention - so long as that is the case I'm not optimistic that this problem isn't going to continue albeit at a reduced level now the police at least seem to be investigating given the number of grooming gangs that have been taken to court.
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  • finchyfinchy Posts: 6,689
    It's that culture of the offenders that it seems to be taboo to mention

    I think it's going to get a good examination now. This is an interesting article by a Muslim victim of sexual abuse who was shunned by the Pakistani community in her area for reporting her abuser to the police.

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfre ... ommunities
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