Mud Guards

jpower
jpower Posts: 554
edited September 2014 in Road buying advice
Hesitate to put any on, but after this mornings wet arse think I should really.

Looking for ones that can attached and detached quickly with no tools ideally so I can leave them off and swap between bikes.

Any recommended?

Comments

  • arlowood
    arlowood Posts: 2,561
    If you have the clearance then the SKS Race Blade Long are potentially an option

    http://www.sks-germany.com/?a=product&r ... NG%20BLACK

    You don't need eyelets at the front or rear and they can be removed fairly quickly if not needed
  • northpole
    northpole Posts: 1,499
    There is a similar thread on this - my preference is SKS over the Crud Guards - much better build quality which feels much more solid/ less prone to falling to bits!

    Peter
  • northpole
    northpole Posts: 1,499
    Meant to add - particularly if you have 25mm tyres it's worth checking clearances.

    Peter
  • paul1000
    paul1000 Posts: 190
    If your just looking for something simple have a look at 'ass saver'.
  • jpower
    jpower Posts: 554
    SKS seem to look like a lot more then I was looking for, in physical terms.

    Ass saver I did see these and wondered if they really worked, sure seen clipons on some peoples bikes too.
  • paul1000
    paul1000 Posts: 190
    The ass saver is an awesome bit of kit, it works brilliantly, weighs nothing, looks tidy, obviously not good for group riding but it does what it says on the tin...saves yer ass.
  • Paul1000 wrote:
    The ass saver is an awesome bit of kit, it works brilliantly, weighs nothing, looks tidy, obviously not good for group riding but it does what it says on the tin...saves yer ass.

    ...and enables you to ruin the kit of anyone stuck behind you whilst saving your own.

    Sorry, london commuter here, I'd like to burn every bike that has one ;)
  • kangarouge
    kangarouge Posts: 210
    Try these. They keep the crud off both your feet and bum. No protection for the person behind though ,but they can always stay on the front if it's not suitable back there.

    http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/sp/road-t ... bbamudr220
  • jpower
    jpower Posts: 554
    The ass saver was cheap enough and worthy to test, picked some up today, will see how they fair on a rainy day.

    Thanks.
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,301
    jpower wrote:
    The ass saver was cheap enough and worthy to test, picked some up today, will see how they fair on a rainy day.

    Thanks.

    Ugo approves of the ass saver...

    Just saying... :wink:
    left the forum March 2023
  • jpower
    jpower Posts: 554
    jpower wrote:
    The ass saver was cheap enough and worthy to test, picked some up today, will see how they fair on a rainy day.

    Thanks.

    Ugo approves of the ass saver...

    Just saying... :wink:
    :D love the portability
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,301
    Yeah, it seems a great idea... I might get one myself... :shock:
    left the forum March 2023
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    The only acceptable form of ars.e saver (I'm not American and I fail to understand how a product designed to save donkeys would be of use to me on my bicycle) is one you make yourself from a plastic milk bottle (which should take about as long as it does to order an ars.e saver). They are an aesthetic abomination and should be banned!
    Faster than a tent.......
  • MichaelW
    MichaelW Posts: 2,164
    ass saver comes in normal, wide, extra wide and XXwide and there is a man's and woman's version.
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,301
    Rolf F wrote:
    The only acceptable form of ars.e saver (I'm not American and I fail to understand how a product designed to save donkeys would be of use to me on my bicycle) is one you make yourself from a plastic milk bottle (which should take about as long as it does to order an ars.e saver). They are an aesthetic abomination and should be banned!

    Even better, which size bottle do you recommend?
    left the forum March 2023
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    Rolf F wrote:
    The only acceptable form of ars.e saver (I'm not American and I fail to understand how a product designed to save donkeys would be of use to me on my bicycle) is one you make yourself from a plastic milk bottle (which should take about as long as it does to order an ars.e saver). They are an aesthetic abomination and should be banned!

    Even better, which size bottle do you recommend?

    That depends on the size of your ars.e............

    Template linked here - but they do a more posh version using chopping mats. This sort of thing looks so crap though it's best to do it so it looks like you never expected it not to look terrible!
    http://triban3owners.freeforums.net/thr ... ver-thread
    Faster than a tent.......
  • As already posted, the SKS race blades are brilliant for putting on and taking off in a hurry- they just simply attach with fancy elastic bands and have plenty of clearance between everything so there isn't much fiddling putting them on and off. :D
    I have a set ready to go in under 2 minutes now, used during summer when I've taken off the 'proper' mudguards for the racing season

    You do have to faff when installing them the first time, and you do have to watch out for the stays slipping on the mudguard occasionally (the rubbing irritated me for months until I realised I'd squashed a stay out of position at some point... ) but it easily beats the Crud Catcher for durability and ease of use.

    The only downside is there is nothing to protect the underside of the brakes, so you still have to clean the muck out of them.

    If you plan to take them on and off a lot, put some electrical tape under the mounting points- it'll avoid scuffed paint later :wink:
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    As already posted, the SKS race blades are brilliant for putting on and taking off in a hurry- they just simply attach with fancy elastic bands and have plenty of clearance between everything so there isn't much fiddling putting them on and off. :D
    I have a set ready to go in under 2 minutes now, used during summer when I've taken off the 'proper' mudguards for the racing season

    You do have to faff when installing them the first time, and you do have to watch out for the stays slipping on the mudguard occasionally (the rubbing irritated me for months until I realised I'd squashed a stay out of position at some point... ) but it easily beats the Crud Catcher for durability and ease of use.

    The only downside is there is nothing to protect the underside of the brakes, so you still have to clean the muck out of them.

    If you plan to take them on and off a lot, put some electrical tape under the mounting points- it'll avoid scuffed paint later :wink:

    They do have form for cracking - but SKS seem good for warranty replacement. The other downside is they don't have the protection for the front mech that the Crud Racer has. And they make your road bike look like a tourer! :lol:

    I suspect that the gap under the brakes on the Raceblades doesn't make much difference. Most of the muck you get on the brakes comes from when you apply the brakes and the dirty water on the rims gets sprayed off by the brake blocks. It'll get into the brakes with or without the gap.

    I just leave the Cruds on year round. They are no bother and hardly visible and it's not as though it doesn't rain in the summer! But I do have a dry weather bike too.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • chrisaonabike
    chrisaonabike Posts: 1,914
    Rolf F wrote:
    I just leave the Cruds on year round. They are no bother and hardly visible and it's not as though it doesn't rain in the summer!
    +1 for the Cruds.

    I do find the rattling of the front one irritating sometimes, and on mine the front cable tie disintegrated a few weeks ago, at moderate speed, resulting in the whole front guard swinging forward with much noisy rubbing on the tyre.

    I was close to home fortunately, and it was ridable at low speed, and did no damage. Two seconds to fix with a new tie. It would have had to come off if I'd been any distance away though.
    Is the gorilla tired yet?
  • Does anyone know a good set of mudguards that will fit a Giant TCX SLR2 with 32mm gatorskins. The main problem is there is no bridge on the seatstays which is where most of them attach to.
    Cannondale CAAD 10
    Genesis Equilibrium Disc 10
    Bird Zero TR
  • jpower
    jpower Posts: 554
    So ass savers didn't save anything today, got back home to find the ass saver was gone, GREAT. So think I better get something I can attach, will look back at the suggestions again. Ashame.
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    Rolf F wrote:
    I just leave the Cruds on year round. They are no bother and hardly visible and it's not as though it doesn't rain in the summer!
    +1 for the Cruds.

    I do find the rattling of the front one irritating sometimes, and on mine the front cable tie disintegrated a few weeks ago, at moderate speed, resulting in the whole front guard swinging forward with much noisy rubbing on the tyre.

    I was close to home fortunately, and it was ridable at low speed, and did no damage. Two seconds to fix with a new tie. It would have had to come off if I'd been any distance away though.

    A timely reminder that it is always useful to carry the odd cable tie. I have a couple, plus a length of gear cable, gaffer taped to the underside of the saddle. Must check they are still there! :lol:
    Faster than a tent.......
  • jpower
    jpower Posts: 554
    Bought the zefal ones, seem spot on. Luckily not had the pleasure of using them, phew.
  • DKay
    DKay Posts: 1,652
    Absolutely love my Crud Road Racers. Or rather, I did until I bought a pair of 25mm Michelin Pro 4 Endurance tyres....
  • daddy0
    daddy0 Posts: 686
    jpower wrote:

    I got one of those a couple of years ago. It will stop your arse getting wet, but won't help the person behind you. I used it in the Pru 86 this year - almost didn't bother, but was glad I did as it did its job. Wish I had a wet bike with full guards though as despite wearing water resistant overshoes my feet were sodden after an hour or so. Its no substitute for full guards.
  • daddy0
    daddy0 Posts: 686
    Oh and I just thought to say - very easy to get on and off, but it will scratch up your carbon seatpost...
  • The seat stay bridge on my SKS guards has eaten into the guard itself over time resulting in the guard moving and rattling. Not a serious issue but they are not forever guard. Everyone I know with race blade guard or similar has on and off guard/tyre rubbing as there is normally not enough clearance. So if you want to ride through winter get a bike with enough clearance for proper guards although this last comment is not so helpful.

    You could sit at the back of the group and use the ass saver.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • jpower
    jpower Posts: 554
    Lucily for me I have no roadie friends :-) (was it something I said) so no fear of the rear. Don't like my carbon post getting scratched up, but then I'd rather have a dry arse :-)
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    Just put a few wraps of insulation tape on the post and then you can use it ?

    My SKS guard snapped through at the bridge out on a ride - but I did get a good few years hard service from it.