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CX Bike for General/Winter use?

rowlersrowlers Posts: 1,614
edited July 2014 in Road general
I'm pondering a CX bike on the C2W scheme that is running at work soon.
I have a nice bike and a "winter" but now fancy a disc braked road bike. I also like the idea of chunkier tyres for the censored roads round here.
Any one else gone down this route?
What did you buy, frame components etc... and how did it go?

Just looking for ideas and inspiration, or is it a bad idea altogether?

Cheers
«1

Posts

  • I fancied getting a CX bike, as I want to use off-road trails near us and commute (without the weight of my clunker MTB) - a CX bike seemed a good fit.

    I went for a Cannondale CAADX (Alu frame/Carbon forks) after reading reviews in BR and seeing the quality of the bike in the flesh. It's a good all-rounder, not too heavy and the mechanical brakes are good (better than road, not as good as new MTB hydraulics).

    For me, there is a sweetspot in the 46/36 front chainring gearing that makes it enjoyable.

    I'd say go for it !

    CXinCountesswells.jpg
    All the gear, but no idea...
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    I found it too heavy to use as winter road bike and ended up getting another bike to use for that.

    Brakes (mechanical) are not that great, best thing about them is that they are not grinding away at the rims.

    Love having it for commuting and fast off road use though.
  • rowlersrowlers Posts: 1,614
    Interesting replies. Was looking at the Kinesis Crosslight Pro6.
    With a 105ish build. BB7 brakes, so I'd guess it would be around 9kg depending on wheels.
    I doubt that it will much heavier than my winter bike anyway - I'd have to weight it!
    So is the extra weight noticeable? I'd hope to be able to take it on club runs and the like in less than ideal weather...
  • I got the Whyte Suffolk, that is designed for the criteria you discuss.
    It is road geometry, using cyclocross fork etc so is fairly robust. Weighs in at 10kg, and has cable operated hydraulic discs.
    I have used it on some light off roading - canal paths / railway tracks etc. and is great. Would probably be OK on rougher stuff again with larger / chunkier tyres.
    I bought it as my best bike - for riding hills as I figured with 100 + kg to slow, I wanted the best brakes I could find.
  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,655
    Noticeable? Not really, we did the Carten 100 (Cardiff to Tenby) in some seriously rubbish weather, 50-60 mph winds. I'm on a Condor Bivio X, 32 spoke wheels, TYP Hy Rd brakes, 32c tyres and mudguards. Rest of the bois with Carbon bikes and Crud mudguards.

    We stayed together all day.

    On a sunny day I would have had to work harder. But on a sunny day I'd have been on my best bike.
    My blog: http://www.roubaixcycling.cc (kit reviews and other musings)
    https://twitter.com/roubaixcc
    Facebook? No. Just say no.
  • InitialisedInitialised Posts: 3,047
    rowlers wrote:
    I'm pondering a CX bike on the C2W scheme that is running at work soon.
    I have a nice bike and a "winter" but now fancy a disc braked road bike. I also like the idea of chunkier tyres for the censored roads round here.
    Any one else gone down this route?
    What did you buy, frame components etc... and how did it go?

    Just looking for ideas and inspiration, or is it a bad idea altogether?

    Cheers

    Yes, been there, done that. I've owned a Specialized Secteur Disc for over a year and maybe 12000miles.

    28mm tyres are a good balance of performance, comfort and puncture resistance and it'll take 35mm and 42s at the front. I am currently running 23mm tyres

    The BB5 disc brakes both ended up seizing up, MRS had the same problem with BB7. To stop this happening you should put copper grease on the threads on the inboard side of the caliper. MRS has upgraded to TRP HyRD brakes and had a problem with them but has had them replaced with an updated version under warranty. I upgraded to TRP Parabox hydraulic brakes, I think they are TRP Dash Carbon calipers so tried and tested highed MTB brakes, they've been fine so far.

    I've ridden it up and over Pennines both on and off road. It can't really handle mud, rooty singletrack or coarse gravel (inch sized rocks) but bigger CX style tyres would allow this. On riverside paths and C2C type routes with the odd non tarmac section are fine.

    If I was buying now I'd spend a little more and go with the Specialized Roubaix SL4 Disc to get a carbon frame and upgrade to 105 Hydros in a year or so.
    I used to just ride my bike to work but now I find myself going out looking for bigger and bigger hills.
  • rowlersrowlers Posts: 1,614
    thanks for the replies.
    It looks like maybe a CX bike is going to do as I want.
    Maybe worth getting some decent wheels as a starting point and I can swap and change tyres to suit the riding I'm doing.
  • InitialisedInitialised Posts: 3,047
    Or just have two sets of wheels setup for different riding.
    I used to just ride my bike to work but now I find myself going out looking for bigger and bigger hills.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 25,101
    Yeah, CX bikes are just as fast and more versatile than race bikes. In fact given the roads we've got in good part of the country, full on race bikes don't make much sense at all
  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,655
    Yeah, CX bikes are just as fast and more versatile than race bikes. In fact given the roads we've got in good part of the country, full on race bikes don't make much sense at all

    This. There's always that niggle, when you're off the beaten track, on a road bike that the conditions might cause you some issues.

    With a CX bike and appropriate tyres you just enjoy the scenery.

    In fact, arguably, they are a better method of discovering new places than a sat nav.
    My blog: http://www.roubaixcycling.cc (kit reviews and other musings)
    https://twitter.com/roubaixcc
    Facebook? No. Just say no.
  • rowlersrowlers Posts: 1,614
    Yeah, CX bikes are just as fast and more versatile than race bikes. In fact given the roads we've got in good part of the country, full on race bikes don't make much sense at all

    I had eyed up the Fugio, but I can get alot more for my money with the Crosslight.
    I'd also really like Ti, but budget doesn't allow. Maybe for my 40th Bday - which is not that long away!
    I'll prob ay with 105 and BB7, not sure on chainset though compact or CX, for mainly road use?
    Also wheelset? Archtypes on Novatech would be cool, but sure what the cost would be...
    Lots to think about...

    I'll see what my LBS comes back with and maybe go for it...
  • rowlersrowlers Posts: 1,614
    Yeah, CX bikes are just as fast and more versatile than race bikes. In fact given the roads we've got in good part of the country, full on race bikes don't make much sense at all

    This. There's always that niggle, when you're off the beaten track, on a road bike that the conditions might cause you some issues.

    With a CX bike and appropriate tyres you just enjoy the scenery.

    In fact, arguably, they are a better method of discovering new places than a sat nav.
    Fact, just done the Clives Cumbrian Way, which has some off road sections and I was sh|tting myslef on my Felt, got and walked for a bit because it was too rough, resulting in clogged speedplays! :(
  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,655
    rowlers wrote:
    Yeah, CX bikes are just as fast and more versatile than race bikes. In fact given the roads we've got in good part of the country, full on race bikes don't make much sense at all

    I had eyed up the Fugio, but I can get alot more for my money with the Crosslight.
    I'd also really like Ti, but budget doesn't allow. Maybe for my 40th Bday - which is not that long away!
    I'll prob ay with 105 and BB7, not sure on chainset though compact or CX, for mainly road use?
    Also wheelset? Archtypes on Novatech would be cool, but sure what the cost would be...
    Lots to think about...

    I'll see what my LBS comes back with and maybe go for it...

    I've gone compact and recently changed to Force WiFli.

    Should get me up even more of those off road hills and paths.
    My blog: http://www.roubaixcycling.cc (kit reviews and other musings)
    https://twitter.com/roubaixcc
    Facebook? No. Just say no.
  • luv2rideluv2ride Posts: 2,360
    rowlers wrote:
    Interesting replies. Was looking at the Kinesis Crosslight Pro6.
    With a 105ish build. BB7 brakes, so I'd guess it would be around 9kg depending on wheels.
    I doubt that it will much heavier than my winter bike anyway - I'd have to weight it!
    So is the extra weight noticeable? I'd hope to be able to take it on club runs and the like in less than ideal weather...

    I've got one (built with a Sram Rival 46/36t chainset, 11-32t cassette and TRP Spyre disc brakes). My 'go to' bike at the moment, as I can head out for a quick evening ride after work and link up road and trails as I please. I don't notice the extra weight, as I find the extra comfort of bigger tyres on the road (running 35mm Sammy Slicks) easily outweighs that. As Ugo says, with the deteriorating quality of our roads these bikes make increasing sense.

    I'd highly recommend it.

    EDIT: just weighed my Pro 6 (out if interest) and it's 9.42 kg including pedals (heavy M530 spd's), Kinesis CX disc wheels, cheap Madison saddle, bottle cages and various light and computer mounts. Reckon it could go a lot lighter. My winter bike with full guards and lightweight rack is 10.30 kg by comparison!
    Scott Solace 10 disc - Kinesis Crosslight Pro6 disc - Scott CR1 SL - Pinnacle Arkose X 650b - Pinnacle Arkose 1x11 "monster cross" - Specialized Singlecross...& an Ernie Ball Musicman Stingray 4 string...
  • rowlersrowlers Posts: 1,614
    luv2ride wrote:
    rowlers wrote:
    Interesting replies. Was looking at the Kinesis Crosslight Pro6.
    With a 105ish build. BB7 brakes, so I'd guess it would be around 9kg depending on wheels.
    I doubt that it will much heavier than my winter bike anyway - I'd have to weight it!
    So is the extra weight noticeable? I'd hope to be able to take it on club runs and the like in less than ideal weather...

    I've got one (built with a Sram Rival 46/36t chainset, 11-32t cassette and TRP Spyre disc brakes). My 'go to' bike at the moment, as I can head out for a quick evening ride after work and link up road and trails as I please. I don't notice the extra weight, as I find the extra comfort of bigger tyres on the road (running 35mm Sammy Slicks) easily outweighs that. As Ugo says, with the deteriorating quality of our roads these bikes make increasing sense.

    I'd highly recommend it.

    EDIT: just weighed my Pro 6 (out if interest) and it's 9.42 kg including pedals (heavy M530 spd's), Kinesis CX disc wheels, cheap Madison saddle, bottle cages and various light and computer mounts. Reckon it could go a lot lighter. My winter bike with full guards and lightweight rack is 10.30 kg by comparison!

    Thats is pretty light then eh! If LBS come through I reckon I'll go for it. For pedals I'd prob run my Crank Bros Candy Cs, but if I really like it I'll have to bite the bullet and get another set of speedplays.
  • xdocxdoc Posts: 331
    Another Kinesis Pro 6 owner hear, built mainly as a winter bike, really pleased with it, here is mine:
    viewtopic.php?t=12961319
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    Noticeable? Not really, we did the Carten 100 (Cardiff to Tenby) in some seriously rubbish weather, 50-60 mph winds. I'm on a Condor Bivio X, 32 spoke wheels, TYP Hy Rd brakes, 32c tyres and mudguards. Rest of the bois with Carbon bikes and Crud mudguards.

    We stayed together all day.

    On a sunny day I would have had to work harder. But on a sunny day I'd have been on my best bike.

    That sounds noticeable to me.

    Would have thought you are working harder in bad weather too but you are right, would be more than happy to do so and keep the best bike in the warm/dry at home, and hear none of that rim grinding noise :shock:
  • GiraffotoGiraffoto Posts: 2,078
    It's the only road-ish bike I've had since 2007 - admittedly, it replaced a heavy steel tourer of 1983 vintage, so it was bound to seem lighter. It's since gone a bit further in the road direction with a swap to 28mm tyres
    For me, there is a sweetspot in the 46/36 front chainring gearing that makes it enjoyable.

    46/36 + 12-28 is a perfect set of road gears if you're taking it easy!
    Specialized Roubaix Elite 2015
    XM-057 rigid 29er
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 25,101
    Giraffoto wrote:
    46/36 + 12-28 is a perfect set of road gears if you're taking it easy!

    The only people I see using "bigger gears" than a 46 x 12 are serious time triallists and a few idiots who rev. with a cadence of 30 rpm in the desperate attempt to get varicose veins prematurely.

    Yesterday I was going 30 mph with a 49 x 14 (weird ring, I know) and could have gone faster with better legs, I am not quite sure how fast you go... clearly very fast, if 46 x 12 is not enough
  • GiraffotoGiraffoto Posts: 2,078
    Giraffoto wrote:
    46/36 + 12-28 is a perfect set of road gears if you're taking it easy!

    . . . I am not quite sure how fast you go... clearly very fast, if 46 x 12 is not enough

    Not very fast - pretty slow sometimes, to be honest. And 46 x 12 only gets used on steep descents. I'd hate for my post to be mistaken for macho posturing, so let me come straight out and say that 46/36 + 12-28 is the gear set on my road bike. I find it low enough for most of the hills I tackle (that is, nothing higher or steeper than a Chiltern) and if I ever swap the Tricross for a carbon framed road racer, I'm taking those chainrings with me.
    Specialized Roubaix Elite 2015
    XM-057 rigid 29er
  • I fancied getting a CX bike, as I want to use off-road trails near us and commute (without the weight of my clunker MTB) - a CX bike seemed a good fit.

    I went for a Cannondale CAADX (Alu frame/Carbon forks) after reading reviews in BR and seeing the quality of the bike in the flesh. It's a good all-rounder, not too heavy and the mechanical brakes are good (better than road, not as good as new MTB hydraulics).

    For me, there is a sweetspot in the 46/36 front chainring gearing that makes it enjoyable.

    I'd say go for it !

    CXinCountesswells.jpg

    Broxbourne woods?

    Im going for a 46/34 chainset option and a 10-28 at back, seems like a good mix between road commute and cx.
    Better than the 50/34 had .
    Tyre wise im also in this position can you do cx on 28mm tyres??? As havnet seen any around being cx specific.
    London2Brighton Challange 100k!
    http://www.justgiving.com/broxbourne-runners
  • FlashartFlashart Posts: 13
    I did exactly what your looking to do, bought a NORCO Threshold on the C2W scheme and quite liking it TBH, its nice to be able to head out when its p!ssing down and shoot across the forest, the only issue I've found so far is I need a bigger chain ring as the gearing's really not suited (for me anyway) for on the road.
  • 964cup964cup Posts: 1,359
    I use a Felt F3X as a commuter and winter bike; I have no trouble keeping up with group rides at winter pace, and enjoy the mudguards and proper brakes. I'm running 46/36 front and 11-28 rear and only miss a larger front ring on descents, and then only rarely given that I spin out at about 130rpm, which is well over 60kph. It's about 8.2kg without mudguards; about 2.2kg more than my summer bike, so noticeable but hardly boat-anchor stuff.
  • rowlersrowlers Posts: 1,614
    Thanks folks, looks like it is doer in theory.
    Lets see if my LBS will play ball ;)
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 25,101

    Im going for a 46/34 chainset option and a 10-28 at back, seems like a good mix between road commute and cx.
    Better than the 50/34 had .
    Tyre wise im also in this position can you do cx on 28mm tyres??? As havnet seen any around being cx specific.

    Not treally... I think the Challenge Almanzo come as 30 mm and they are good for gravel and dry, as well as road, but for something a bit more hard core you need 32 or more
  • kayakerchriskayakerchris Posts: 361
    Genesis single speed with discs. Awesome fun.
  • pilot_petepilot_pete Posts: 1,961
    Done two winters on my Felt F65x crosser which is purely a winter bike for me and never crossed.

    image.jpg

    Modifications are;

    Saddle changed for a Fizik Aliante and seatpost changed for a Thomson.
    28mm Four Seasons tyres fitted and I have never had a puncture.
    Full guards fitted (quite tricky as no front guard mounts and the stays had to be bent around the disc callipers) mudflaps also fitted to the guards using stainless bolts, washers and nylon nuts. This setup is fantastic and everyone wants to follow my wheel in the rain!
    Rear wheel rebuilt due to rubbish freehub which failed twice after not very long. It now has a Hope hub, which is superb.
    Still on original BB5 brakes, which are significantly better than any rim brake, especially in the wet. I changed the pads for last winter for some upgraded ones as I felt sure they must be worn out, however the old ones still had plenty of life left in them!
    BB30 bottom bracket bearings lasted one winter, which isn't great, but was a cheap repair. New chain, big chainring and cassette this winter. All cheap enough.

    So, it rides superbly, larger volume tyres can be pumped up to less psi and provide a more comfortable ride, higher spoke count can handle our bad roads with ease, disk brakes are the future, especially for winter road bikes and Cable operated are perfectly adequate and keep things simple, SRAM Rival is perfectly adequate and cheap to replace as it wears. The extra clearance means full, wider guards can be fitted (with some ingenuity and patience). What's more is it looks quite good for a winter hack! I do clean it after every ride as (naturally) it lives in the house....

    PP
  • robbo2011robbo2011 Posts: 1,017
    My take on this is, yes it is potentially a good idea, with caveats.

    I run a Genesis Vapour as a bad weather bike kitted out with full mudguards and while it is perfectly functional, it is not fun or enjoyable to ride, mainly because of the weight (12kg with all fittings) and a harsh ride. It is also way slower than my main bike, probably because I ride a lot of hills and the weight is like carrying a boat anchor.

    So, if the OP wants to go down this route, I would recommend to spend a bit more and get a lighter bike which is actually responsive and fun to ride. Otherwise the bike will spend a lot of time parked in the garage.
  • rowlersrowlers Posts: 1,614
    robbo2011 wrote:
    My take on this is, yes it is potentially a good idea, with caveats.

    I run a Genesis Vapour as a bad weather bike kitted out with full mudguards and while it is perfectly functional, it is not fun or enjoyable to ride, mainly because of the weight (12kg with all fittings) and a harsh ride. It is also way slower than my main bike, probably because I ride a lot of hills and the weight is like carrying a boat anchor.

    So, if the OP wants to go down this route, I would recommend to spend a bit more and get a lighter bike which is actually responsive and fun to ride. Otherwise the bike will spend a lot of time parked in the garage.
    What sort of weight are you talking for your vapour tho? I'm looking at a crosslight pro6, 105level cx group, bb7 brakes, and some wheels the region of 1800gs. Finishing kit will be picked up from the bay.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    rowlers wrote:
    robbo2011 wrote:
    My take on this is, yes it is potentially a good idea, with caveats.

    I run a Genesis Vapour as a bad weather bike kitted out with full mudguards and while it is perfectly functional, it is not fun or enjoyable to ride, mainly because of the weight (12kg with all fittings) and a harsh ride. It is also way slower than my main bike, probably because I ride a lot of hills and the weight is like carrying a boat anchor.

    So, if the OP wants to go down this route, I would recommend to spend a bit more and get a lighter bike which is actually responsive and fun to ride. Otherwise the bike will spend a lot of time parked in the garage.
    What sort of weight are you talking for your vapour tho? I'm looking at a crosslight pro6, 105level cx group, bb7 brakes, and some wheels the region of 1800gs. Finishing kit will be picked up from the bay.

    12kg perhaps?
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