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Lack of leg endurance

Gibbo3771Gibbo3771 Posts: 145
Hi fellow bikers!

Been a member of this forum for quite a while, however been off the bike up until 6 weeks ago due to a collarbone OTB injury back last year.

So I have been riding a lot, almost everyday for the past 6 weeks, maybe a little longer and I was wondering if someone can help me get to the root of my inability to peddle with a push or endure a long downhill session without upper leg fatigue.

I can spin forever, literally. I can drop to a comfortable gear and spin for hours despite the hill. However the problem comes when I am say, doing a downhill section or a hill section that has a sections that I just have to peddle, I peddle whenever the terrain suits it.

The problem being is my legs get pumped quite quickly and it feels as if I can no longer push.

My legs are fairly muscular, with plenty of power behind them. I just can't get to the bottom of the fatigue issue.

My diet is not amazing, however I eat fish and lean meats whenever the budget suits it. I also cycle to the places that I bike, if that makes sense. So my body is fairly warmed up by the time I get there, would not say it is tired though.

So what could be the cause of my leg fatigue? Any exercises you recommend to reduce this? My overall fitness is "ok", I can't run for censored mind you.

Posts

  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,550
    The only way for training for endurance is to do endurance rides. Are you sure your saddle is high enough (slightly concerned by your upper leg comments)? It's very unusual to be fine on the up but not on the flat (if I've understood you)

    It's pedal by the way - peddle is to sell things :wink:
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • Gibbo3771Gibbo3771 Posts: 145
    I can not believe I spelt that wrong...

    I think my saddle is high enough, on the downs my saddle is all the way down and any pedalling is done while standing in short bursts.

    I'll try raising the saddle I bit.

    It is sort of starting to wear me down this, as it is ruining my rides. I only cycle to these places to do runs on the downhill parts.
  • photonic69photonic69 Posts: 1,033
    You say you ride almost every day? You need some rest days for muscle recovery and growth. Also eat protein as soon as after exercise. Boiled egg, tuna sandwich, protein drink etc. this will help build muscles. Stick at it but maybe leave 3-4 days between hard climbs but then push yourself as much as you can. It will come.
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,550
    photonic69 wrote:
    You say you ride almost every day? You need some rest days for muscle recovery and growth. Also eat protein as soon as after exercise. Boiled egg, tuna sandwich, protein drink etc. this will help build muscles. Stick at it but maybe leave 3-4 days between hard climbs but then push yourself as much as you can. It will come.

    Actually, it's carbs that you need quickly - protein you can take as you need it and you can use it. Glycogen levels will drop if you ride reasonably hard every day and you'll completely run out of gas. If you must ride every day, alternate fast days with very slow days
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • njee20njee20 Posts: 9,613
    Actually, it's carbs that you need quickly - protein you can take as you need it and you can use it. Glycogen levels will drop if you ride reasonably hard every day and you'll completely run out of gas. If you must ride every day, alternate fast days with very slow days

    Mmmm, yes and no. Protein will help you recover faster, in that it will repair muscle damage. Carbs will replete glycogen stores, which will give you energy. Both important, they do different things. There is a window after exercising when protein is most readily absorbed, hence it's good to eat some protein ASAP after a tough ride.

    Nothing wrong with training on consecutive days, as long as you plan your sessions/nutrition accordingly, you'll never get fast if you spend every other day riding "very slowly".
  • photonic69photonic69 Posts: 1,033
    Most forms of protein rich foods have enough carbs to satisfy the requirements but overall a consistent good diet is essential. Low GI carbs such as wholemeal pasta, rice and porridge to build up reserves and protein for recovery. Some hi GI snacks are good for a quick energy boost on trail. White bread jam sandwich will get you sprinting last five miles.
  • FerralsFerrals Posts: 785
    I thought in general it was 4 carb to 1 protein for most efficient protein usage and fastest recovery - I may have misunderstood but I thought you needed the glycogen present in the muscles for your body to use the protein properly, otherwise it uses the protein as fuel instead of muscle building/repair. My highly unscientific instant post ride food is a glass of milk, a chocolate digestive and a decent amount of unsalted, un roasted nuts.

    What exercise were you doing when off the bike? Maybe you are just being optistic and need to pace yourself?
  • njee20njee20 Posts: 9,613
    Sort of, 4:1 carbs:protein is a good ratio to allow most protein absorption during exercise - hence High 5 do a 4:1 drink, making it good for multi day rides and so on. After exercise you want a higher ratio of protein (but still want some carbs), because you're not focusing on keeping your glycogen stores topped up in quite the same way.
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