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New fork advice

James68James68 Posts: 38
edited May 2014 in MTB buying advice
Hi,

I'm currently looking for a new fork and was wondering if anyone could give me some advice.

Criteria:
Must be for a 29er.
100-140mm travel - Ideally 120mm
Must be able to support at least a 180mm disc.
Must have a 1 1/8 steerer tube.
Must be an air fork.
Not bothered about the weight

I'm currently looking at these two:

RockShox XC 32 TK Solo Air Forks - 9mmQR 2014 (http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/rock ... lsrc=aw.ds)

SR Suntour SF13 Raidon LO AIR 29" Suspension Fork. 100mm Travel, Manual Lockout, Disc Only (http://www.amazon.co.uk/SR-Suntour-Raid ... +raidon+29)

What do you think?

Thanks

Posts

  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    What's your budget and what bike is it for?
    There aren't many frame to work with a range of 100mm to 140mm.
  • James68James68 Posts: 38
    Sorry - About £150 and for a 2013 Felt Nine 60.

    Specs:

    Frame: FELT Nine series 29er frame, butted 6061 aluminium w/ Dynaform top tube and seat stays: IS disc mounts, oversized integrated head tube for semi-integrated headset, replaceable derailleur hanger

    Fork: SR Suntour SF13-XCM HLO 29 100mm travel hydraulic lockout, hi-ten 1-1/8 steerer tube, forged + cnc 6061 crown, two sides coil spring + mcu, w/ low-profile mini boots and preload adjust, disc brake specific lowers

    Headset: Semi-integrated 1-1/8 Aheadset steel cups, caged bearing, w/ felt Tornado aluminium top cap, custom curved 1 x 15mm + 2 x 5mm straight washers
  • James68James68 Posts: 38
    Felt Nine 60 29er - 2013 model (HT)

  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    The Rockshox forks you linked to are 26" but the 29" version would be a good choice.
    Merlin Cycles are good for forks.
  • James68James68 Posts: 38
    They've just ran out in the last hour then (of 29" versions). I like the look of the Rockshox, do you think that's the best option though?
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    Yes, they are better than the Raidons - smoother, better damped, stiffer structure.
  • James68James68 Posts: 38
    The Rookie wrote:
    Don't ruin the bike by fitting forks any longer than the 100mm.
    Only reason I suggested it was because my LBS said that I could go up to 140mm without ruining the ride, it came with a 100mm fork but it might as well be rigid lol it's that censored which is why I'm upgrading.
  • James68James68 Posts: 38
    Another question, in the picture (link below) the steerer tube is really long. Is it a different length in real life or is that normal or does it have to be cut down?

    http://www.merlincycles.com/rockshox-xc ... 65882.html
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    An extra 40mm on the fork is going to noticably raise the bottom bracket making it fall in to turns. Its going to steer like an oil tanker as well.
    The bikes designer came up with geometry to work at it's best with the length of fork the bike was sold with.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    James68 wrote:
    The Rookie wrote:
    Don't ruin the bike by fitting forks any longer than the 100mm.
    Only reason I suggested it was because my LBS said that I could go up to 140mm without ruining the ride, it came with a 100mm fork but it might as well be rigid lol it's that censored which is why I'm upgrading.
    I wouldn't take any other advice from that LBS then. It's a moronic statement.

    Raidons are not a bad fork, either they are set up badly or need some maintenance, they appear on some well rated budget bikes like the Voodoo Bizango.

    How much sag are you running?
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    edited May 2014
    James68 wrote:
    Another question, in the picture (link below) the steerer tube is really long. Is it a different length in real life or is that normal or does it have to be cut down?

    http://www.merlincycles.com/rockshox-xc ... 65882.html
    Steerers normally have to be cut down. Easy job. Doesn't have to be a perfect cut as the top doesn't touch anything.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

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  • batmobatmo Posts: 277
    cooldad wrote:
    Steerer normally have to be cut down. Easy job. Doesn't have to be a perfect cut as the top doesn't touch anything.
    Use tape stuck around the steerer to help you cut straight and worth a few pennies investment in a new hacksaw blade.
    Viscount Grand Touring - in bits
    Trek ZX6500 - semi-retired
    HP Velotechnik Spirit
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    Specialized Camber Comp
  • James68James68 Posts: 38
    How much sag are you running?
    At the moment no sag lol - the fork is terrible and probably faulty, that's why I'm upgrading. Part of the problem is that I don't know how much travel I need, the fork seizes sometimes and goes rigid basically. The ride is so bad that I have no idea what is normal so I was thinking of a 140mm for safety. I mostly do XC but occasionally go to trail centres like Cannock. I'll get a 100mm and probably the Rockshox. Thanks for the help.
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    140mm will ruin handling and probably invalidate the warranty.
    You're unlikely to get a 140mm 29er fork in your budget anyway.
    Stick to 100mm for the best handling.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    James68 wrote:
    How much sag are you running?
    At the moment no sag lol - the fork is terrible and probably faulty, that's why I'm upgrading. Part of the problem is that I don't know how much travel I need, the fork seizes sometimes and goes rigid basically. The ride is so bad that I have no idea what is normal so I was thinking of a 140mm for safety. I mostly do XC but occasionally go to trail centres like Cannock. I'll get a 100mm and probably the Rockshox. Thanks for the help.
    Just sounds like you need to split the upper and lowers and clean it out and relube. Do you jet wash the bike at all?

    What sag was it set at when working?
  • James68James68 Posts: 38
    Yeah I service the fork regularly by myself, when it was new it was no better. The problem is that because I am so light, a coil fork won't compress enough even on the lowest setting. It says you're from leamington so you'll probably know TheBikeYard - that's where I got it from. They made the fork as soft as it would go and it still doesn't have any sag. That's why I need to replace it.
  • James68James68 Posts: 38
    Batmo wrote:
    cooldad wrote:
    Steerer normally have to be cut down. Easy job. Doesn't have to be a perfect cut as the top doesn't touch anything.
    Use tape stuck around the steerer to help you cut straight and worth a few pennies investment in a new hacksaw blade.

    Thanks for the info - one thing I don't understand - what about the star nut? How would I get it in?
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Either a specific tool or you can use a bolt, V brake pad or something similar and tap it in carefully.
    Someone had a bright idea a while back but being old I can't remember what it was.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    Yes I know the Bikeyard well, I do hope it wasn't anyone from there who suggested 140mm forks, I use most the local shops off and on, both BY and Broadribbs are great for doing little jobs that may need specialist tools quite cheaply.

    You could buy a softer spring of course.
  • James68James68 Posts: 38
    cooldad wrote:
    Either a specific tool or you can use a bolt, V brake pad or something similar and tap it in carefully.
    Someone had a bright idea a while back but being old I can't remember what it was.

    Like this?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9Dy11NGBIE
  • James68James68 Posts: 38
    The Rookie wrote:
    You could buy a softer spring of course.

    The mechanic said there is no spring in the fork I've got, and to be fair it still wouldn't be a good fork - might as well upgrade.
    I think I'll get the Rockshox when I can afford it - do star nuts tend to come with it or would I have to buy another?
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    James68 wrote:
    cooldad wrote:
    Either a specific tool or you can use a bolt, V brake pad or something similar and tap it in carefully.
    Someone had a bright idea a while back but being old I can't remember what it was.

    Like this?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9Dy11NGBIE

    Yep that's it.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
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