How do you rate Vittoria Rubino tyres ?

Serious Cat
Serious Cat Posts: 489
edited May 2014 in Road buying advice
£10 tyre from Wiggle that visually look very nice , but those who have used them did you find them to be puncture resistant and great value for money or did you find them to be not so good at all ?
This serious internet site..............I serious cat

Comments

  • jibberjim
    jibberjim Posts: 2,810
    They're good tyres, as long as it's not wet, when the grip disappears...
    Jibbering Sports Stuff: http://jibbering.com/sports/
  • gabriel959
    gabriel959 Posts: 4,227
    Rubino Pro are a lot better than the standard hosepipe Rubino.
    x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x
    Commuting / Winter rides - Jamis Renegade Expert
    Pootling / Offroad - All-City Macho Man Disc
    Fast rides Cannondale SuperSix Ultegra
  • thegibdog
    thegibdog Posts: 2,106
    You can get the Rubino Pro Slick for £27.50 a pair at Merlin, seem like a great tyre for the price:

    http://www.merlincycles.com/vittoria-ru ... 63561.html
  • petemadoc
    petemadoc Posts: 2,331
    Bad bad bad BAD!

    I have the pro version on my commuting bike and the grip in the wet is terrible. Roundabouts become scary major hazards.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    gabriel959 wrote:
    Rubino Pro are a lot better than the standard hosepipe Rubino.

    The only difference is the folding bead - still the same tyre. Either way, I really rate them. Very good all-rounder and perfectly capable in wet or dry.
  • MisterMuncher
    MisterMuncher Posts: 1,302
    They're a great tyre in the dry or wet, and light enough in the pro version. I found them squirelly in the extreme in transitional conditions, though. Full wet is fine, but fresh rain is a bit of a nightmare.
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    A wierd one - some people love them, some hate them. I got so fed up of falling off and sliding this winter on them as soon as it got wet that I had to take them off. Fine in the dry though. (These were the aforementioned Pro Slicks from Merlin).

    So far, I find Vittoria tyres to be crap. No matter whether or not some people do find them fine, clearly they have been inadequately tested as they are highly sensitive to certain road conditions in certain areas - possibly just the nature of the geology and soils and it influence on the make up of the crud that washes onto the roads after heavy rain. And then there were the Open Corsas that don't fit onto my shallow rim wheels because they are 6mm smaller in circumference than any other tyre I have! That's either dire quality control or dire design.

    Basically, I'd say don't touch Rubinos with a barge pole unless you can get a recommendation from someone who rides them in your area and in the wet (assuming you ride in the wet as well). MRS loves them so I'd say you are safe in the North of Scotland and Netherlands!
    Faster than a tent.......
  • fishyweb
    fishyweb Posts: 173
    I've done 5000+ miles on a set of Pros, on various standards of road surface and weather, and found them to be great. Grip is good, and I've not had a single p*nct*re in them.
    http://app.strava.com/athletes/287459
    Member of http://www.UKnetrunner.co.UK - the greatest online affiliated running club
  • yakk
    yakk Posts: 589
    Hi there, use the Rubino pros and find them reasonable in all ways and not excelling in anything. Good longevity and a bit dubious in the wet, so I ride within their limitations. Used pro slicks as well without noticing worse grip. The Pros have 150 tpi, as opposed to the standard Rubino non-folding having 60, very different tyres. Now they are like riding on an ice rink at the slightest hint of moisture.
    You can get grippier, faster and more expensive tyres.
    Yak
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,301
    10 pounds tyres are 10 pounds tyres... they are OK, in the same way a Halfords Carrera is OK.... however, if you spend thousands on a bike, you might as well spend a bit more on your tyres. Tyres are important, more important than most of the clutter people spend money on
    left the forum March 2023
  • rickeverett
    rickeverett Posts: 988
    I wouldn't get them again.

    Hard tyres and not very comfortable. Loose grip easy too in dust or wet.

    Best all-round for me is GP4000 so far. The difference going from Rubino Pro to those was very noticeable.
  • passout
    passout Posts: 4,425
    I think they are OK - mainly because you can find them discounted. I have them on a commuter - fine for that. Hard though.
    'Happiness serves hardly any other purpose than to make unhappiness possible' Marcel Proust.
  • arran77
    arran77 Posts: 9,260
    As other have said basically you get what you pay for, they are an inexpensive tyre and are OK, that's all.

    I recently changed mine to vittoria open corsa evo cx's and the difference is like chalk and cheese.
    "Arran, you are like the Tony Benn of smut. You have never diluted your depravity and always stand by your beliefs. You have my respect sir and your wife my pity" :lol:

    seanoconn
  • gabriel959
    gabriel959 Posts: 4,227
    Imposter wrote:
    gabriel959 wrote:
    Rubino Pro are a lot better than the standard hosepipe Rubino.

    The only difference is the folding bead - still the same tyre. Either way, I really rate them. Very good all-rounder and perfectly capable in wet or dry.

    No, they are not, one is a 60 tpi tyre, the other one a 150 tpi, I've had both and they feel differently.
    x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x
    Commuting / Winter rides - Jamis Renegade Expert
    Pootling / Offroad - All-City Macho Man Disc
    Fast rides Cannondale SuperSix Ultegra
  • drlodge
    drlodge Posts: 4,826
    10 pounds tyres are 10 pounds tyres... they are OK, in the same way a Halfords Carrera is OK.... however, if you spend thousands on a bike, you might as well spend a bit more on your tyres. Tyres are important, more important than most of the clutter people spend money on

    +1 Decent tyres (and thin inner tubes) are the easiest, best value upgrade you can apply to a bike. Why spoil a good bike for a ha'peth of tar...
    WyndyMilla Massive Attack | Rourke 953 | Condor Italia 531 Pro | Boardman CX Pro | DT Swiss RR440 Tubeless Wheels
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  • Moonbiker
    Moonbiker Posts: 1,706
    Seems some confusion in this thread some rubinos as decent the pro 3 ones that cost £18 are ok. The OP is asking about the cheapo wired ones iv'e no idea but i bet theres alot or difference between the 2 models as reflected in the spec/price like comparing chalk & cheese.
  • meanredspider
    meanredspider Posts: 12,337
    Rolf F wrote:
    Basically, I'd say don't touch Rubinos with a barge pole unless you can get a recommendation from someone who rides them in your area and in the wet (assuming you ride in the wet as well). MRS loves them so I'd say you are safe in the North of Scotland and Netherlands!

    Yes - I love the Pro folding tyres. They came as OEM tyres on my Volagi and I'd never come across them before - I nearly took them off but thought I'd give them a go and I've never looked back. I've tried GP4000Ss a couple of times in the hope that they'd be quicker on longer rides but they made no difference to speed and attract punctures (especially in the wet) like nothing. Vittoria do a "Tech" version (for an extra quid) with a wet weather compound if you're worried about that. Personally, I've never had a grip issue. They're pretty quick and very puncture resistant.

    I actually doubt that there's a fast, grippy and puncture-resistant tyre - I think you can pick any two of those. I think the Rubino Pro does all three reasonably with puncture resistance being its major strength without trading too much speed or grip. If I know it's going to be slippery (wet cobbles around Amsterdam) then I stick on the Vittoria Paves (stick to anything but not the fastest)
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    I actually doubt that there's a fast, grippy and puncture-resistant tyre - I think you can pick any two of those.

    I'd say that the Schwalbe Durano or Durano S is that tyre (the S trading a little of the puncture resistance for a little more speed - but not much in it either way). I only tried the Rubinos because I was irritated with the Durano habit of shedding casing threads - not a practical bother but mildly irksome. I'll go back to being irked when I've used these Rubinos up!
    Faster than a tent.......
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    I bought a pair of the £10 wired jobbies as the cheapest way of getting a second bike on the road. Can't really make my mind up about them.
    They survived a 50 mile sportive during which a thunderstorm washed loads of flint shards into the road and caused dozens of punctures to others. Another day they succumbed to a flint when I was just 10 miles from home and riding in the wet; sliced the tyre and shredded the tube. Not convinced my GP 4 Seasons would've survived it. Had to apply a heavy duty patch to the inside of the tyre to eke some more miles out of it. Riding in the dry I get the feeling they are a bit lifeless, but what can you expect for a tenner? I think I'll get bored with them before they wear out.
  • patrickf
    patrickf Posts: 536
    Rolf F wrote:
    I actually doubt that there's a fast, grippy and puncture-resistant tyre - I think you can pick any two of those.

    I'd say that the Schwalbe Durano or Durano S is that tyre (the S trading a little of the puncture resistance for a little more speed - but not much in it either way). I only tried the Rubinos because I was irritated with the Durano habit of shedding casing threads - not a practical bother but mildly irksome. I'll go back to being irked when I've used these Rubinos up!
    This was the reason I stopped using Duranos. At the time Schwalbe said that didn't look right so they were exchanged and the replacements did the same.

    I kept them and found someone post from Schwalbe that it's ok for the chafer to shed and that you can just pull it off. Having done that the Duranos are now on the commuter again with no problems.
  • kangarouge
    kangarouge Posts: 210
    I've been using the Rubino Pro (folding) versions for the last three years and found them fine, though I have just recently fitted some Conti. Grand Prix 4000S instead. Even after two rides I'm impressed with the Contis. and even at this early stage I don't think I'll be going back to buying Vittorias.

    All the positive comments on this forum and the customer feedback on Wiggle seem to be well founded. Glad I made the change.
  • DeVlaeminck
    DeVlaeminck Posts: 8,908
    I wouldn't get them again.

    Hard tyres and not very comfortable. Lose grip easy too in dust or wet.

    Exactly my experience too. ProSlicks are the only tyre I've taken off a bike before they were worn simply because I didn't trust them.
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
  • I use to run ultremo zx's on my cube, my sons de rosa came with rubino pros as standard. After constant punctures with the zx's, i tried rubino 3's with a view to a better tyre if they were no good. Ive stuck with them since, and a lot of my fellow riders are now using them. we only do sportives and distance riding,but ive had the same pair on now for well over a 1000 miles with no punctures, and theyre still going strong.