An expensive mistake!

brit66
brit66 Posts: 350
edited April 2014 in Road general
This is what happens when your chain is too long. Luckily the only expense is a new 105 derallieur and a rear hanger (anyone know where to get a 10 year old Bianchi SL3 rear hanger?).

Fortunately, it stopped millimetres before taking our several drive-side spokes.

PS, glad I had my cleat covers on me for the 3 mile walk home. :lol:

P1040780-res.jpg

Comments

  • me-109
    me-109 Posts: 1,915
    And why a small chain tool carried with you could save you a long walk by turning your bike temporarily into a single speed.
  • Try these guys.

    http://gearmechhanger.com/

    They matched mine just from a photo.
  • How did the chain come out of the cage between the two jockey wheels? The picture clearly shows it has done, and I have never seen this happen before. Was it correctly fitted in the first place?
  • slowbike
    slowbike Posts: 8,498
    Me-109 wrote:
    And why a small chain tool carried with you could save you a long walk by turning your bike temporarily into a single speed.

    I was going to do this with the wife's bike when her rear mech dropped a jockeywheel - but in the rain and realising it was ~1-2 miles "home" I just jumped on and scooted (her saddle is lower than mine) ..

    She was doing a womens only sportive so I'd already given her my bike to complete the ride :)
  • brit66
    brit66 Posts: 350
    Thanks, that's a BIG choice. I'm sure it's in there somewhere!
    And why a small chain tool carried with you could save you a long walk by turning your bike temporarily into a single speed.
    I know some people take these with them but I've always thought of a complete mechanical failure as Infinitesimally small. I'll be taking mine with me on long rides from now on.
    Try these guys.
    http://gearmechhanger.com/
    They matched mine just from a photo.
    Thanks, that's a good idea. I'll take a photo then.
    How did the chain come out of the cage between the two jockey wheels? The picture clearly shows it has done, and I have never seen this happen before. Was it correctly fitted in the first place?
    The side of the derailleur was ripped clean off and left in at least two large fragments in the road behind me.

    Like I said, I'm just glad it didn't break several of the spokes as well.
  • navrig2
    navrig2 Posts: 1,844
    I did exactly the same about 3 or 4 weeks ago.

    I had to replace the chain (it had twisted), the hanger (snapped and twisted) and the rear derailleur (the cage plate has snapped and, I suspect, the body twisted). The chainstay took a hammering with chips out of the lacquer.

    I replaced the cassette too.

    How do you know the chanin was too long and that this is what caused it? I had ridden mine for over a year with all sorts of riding - alps, local, sportives etc and had no problem. I suspect that the issue was a stiff chain link which caused it to jam in the jockey wheels causing the derailleur to pull back up and over the hub (I was standing up on a steep hill at the time) until the hanger snapped and the whol lot was catapulted onto the chainstay.

    Cost me about £80 to fix without taking into account chips in the lacquer.
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    brit66 wrote:
    I know some people take these with them but I've always thought of a complete mechanical failure as Infinitesimally small. I'll be taking mine with me on long rides from now on.

    What happened to you might be a highly rare event but the likelihood of a plain chain failure is hardly infinitesimally small.

    Just carry a multi tool with a built in chain tool. That way, if it happens, you'll not have to rely on the luck I benefitted from the one time I had a chain break - it broke on the link adjacent the quick link so I didn't actually need to use the chain tool to fix it! :lol:
    Faster than a tent.......
  • jordan_217
    jordan_217 Posts: 2,580
    Buy yourself some cleaning products and lube while you're at it......
    “Training is like fighting with a gorilla. You don’t stop when you’re tired. You stop when the gorilla is tired.”
  • hstiles
    hstiles Posts: 414
    Me-109 wrote:
    And why a small chain tool carried with you could save you a long walk by turning your bike temporarily into a single speed.

    +1

    I managed to limp the last 10 miles to the finish at the Flanders sportive last weekend after my rear mech was torn off.

    Try http://www.gearmechhangers.com for the required part. Generally very good, although the spare hanger I bought from them doesn't appear to fit very well.
  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Expensive would have been when the rear-mech took-out all the spokes in the wheel and the jammed transmission resulted in a snapped chainstay - best one I saw was during a race where guy was riding a Time VXRS with Super Record.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • Initialised
    Initialised Posts: 3,047
    Try these: BETD
    I used to just ride my bike to work but now I find myself going out looking for bigger and bigger hills.
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    I've never found the chain tools on multi tools to be usable in practice. I just take a seperate one with me.
  • chris_bass
    chris_bass Posts: 4,913
    How would a longer chain cause this?
    www.conjunctivitis.com - a site for sore eyes
  • navrig2
    navrig2 Posts: 1,844
    Chris Bass wrote:
    How would a longer chain cause this?

    Presumably because a long chain cannot be kept taught with the movement in the derailleur and cage meaning that there is a likelyhood of the chain either jumping off the cassette or the jockey wheels and lodging between the cassette and the hub or between the jockey wheel and the cage. Once jambed you keep pedalling (especially if standing up) and the whole lot gets pulled clockwise up and over the hub until the hanger snaps.

    I would expect the problem only to exist if the chain was super long which is why I asked how he knew it was a long chain which caused the problem in my post earlier in the thread.
  • brit66
    brit66 Posts: 350
    Presumably because a long chain cannot be kept taught with the movement in the derailleur and cage meaning that there is a likelyhood of the chain either jumping off the cassette or the jockey wheels and lodging between the cassette and the hub or between the jockey wheel and the cage. Once jambed you keep pedalling (especially if standing up) and the whole lot gets pulled clockwise up and over the hub until the hanger snaps.

    I would expect the problem only to exist if the chain was super long which is why I asked how he knew it was a long chain which caused the problem in my post earlier in the thread.

    Thanks for the explanation - that saves me the job. That's exactly what happened.

    I put the chain on in a bit of a hurry and was going to get around to shortening it at some point ( :oops: ), and I could hear the derailleur touching the cassette when on the small chain ring, so when I stood up on the pedals for a particularly steep hill, BANG! :(
    Try these: BETD
    I found it! But it's out of stock... bugger!

    gearmechhanger.com might have it though.
  • t4tomo
    t4tomo Posts: 2,643
    speak to Epic cycles - they are bianchi specialists - you'll need to rig them though as they dont have a webshop for parts
    Bianchi Infinito CV
    Bianchi Via Nirone 7 Ultegra
    Brompton S Type
    Carrera Vengeance Ultimate Ltd
    Gary Fisher Aquila '98
    Front half of a Viking Saratoga Tandem
  • brit66
    brit66 Posts: 350
    speak to Epic cycles - they are bianchi specialists - you'll need to rig them though as they dont have a webshop for parts

    Thanks, I'll do that if the above can't help.
  • brit66
    brit66 Posts: 350
    +1

    I managed to limp the last 10 miles to the finish at the Flanders sportive last weekend after my rear mech was torn off.

    I actually 'scooted' the bike along for a fair way although most of it was uphill on the way home :roll: Unfortunately when I was about 2 mins from my front door, freewheeling down the only downhill bit with my cleat covers still on, my foot slipped causing me to straddle the top tube before veering off into a hedge :oops:
    Expensive would have been when the rear-mech took-out all the spokes in the wheel and the jammed transmission resulted in a snapped chainstay - best one I saw was during a race where guy was riding a Time VXRS with Super Record.

    Ooch, that's expensive, I feel better now knowing mine will cost about £50 in total :lol: