1970 NOS bike

Comments

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    Would be like going back in time!

    Tyres will need replacing though ;-)
  • homers_double
    homers_double Posts: 7,995
    I hope they detensioned the spokes whilst the bikes were in storage...
    Advocate of disc brakes.
  • Bordersroadie
    Bordersroadie Posts: 1,052
    Moonbiker wrote:
    Pretty

    Pretty overpriced.
  • Great brand. Has a bit of heritage, anyway. Not a high spec, but a nice bike nonetheless and a fantastic collector's opportunity...
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 40,414
    Moonbiker wrote:
    Pretty

    Pretty overpriced.

    Seriously overpriced more like. That frameset is lower than cromoly which I had on my first 'serious' bike and which was cheap, heavy and nasty. Information on the components is vague but won't be high level on a frame of that quality.

    This seems to be a case of aiming at the suckers who think anything retro and steel is good. I wonder what my 653 framed bike is worth? Think I'll clean it up and get it on sale as there are obviously some mugs out there.
  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Steelie rims and gas-pipe frame, the 70s equivalent of shed-ware - massively over-priced for what it is. For the same money you'd buy something tidy made from Columbus SL and contemporary Campagnolo components that will continue to appreciate in value because its a good bike.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • navrig2
    navrig2 Posts: 1,844
    Love the brake cable routing!!

    You're not really paying for the componentary value but the rarity.

    If someone found a mint condition Hillman Imp it would attract silly money but would still be a heap of Scottish made rubbish.

    I would NOT buy one though.
  • Moonbiker
    Moonbiker Posts: 1,706
    Whats the modern eqivalent lvl spec then?


    Triban 3 or lower ?

    Just think in 2050 their will be rare NOS carbon fibre treks etc. :o
  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    It's lower-rent that a Decathlon Triban - more like a Viking.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    edited March 2014
    Navrig2 wrote:
    Love the brake cable routing!!

    You're not really paying for the componentary value but the rarity.

    If someone found a mint condition Hillman Imp it would attract silly money but would still be a heap of Scottish made rubbish.

    I would NOT buy one though.

    Trouble is, on that basis, all you can sensibly do with it is hang it on the wall. Once you've ridden it, it becomes a cheap old bike that you paid a serious wedge for.

    Brake cable routing looks pretty conventional to me! :?
    Faster than a tent.......
  • term1te
    term1te Posts: 1,462
    I still see a lot of Motobecane bikes from the 70s, and earlier, in use over here. I don't think there is a constant supply of NOS bikes for the gullable, they've just lasted 40+ years. Lower end bikes are seen as disposable in the UK, where as in mainland Europe a bike is for life. I saw a guy at the bus stop last night on a 1950 Swiss military bike, the date is stamped on the frame.
  • navrig2
    navrig2 Posts: 1,844
    Rolf F wrote:
    Navrig2 wrote:
    Love the brake cable routing!!

    You're not really paying for the componentary value but the rarity.

    If someone found a mint condition Hillman Imp it would attract silly money but would still be a heap of Scottish made rubbish.

    I would NOT buy one though.

    Trouble is, on that basis, all you can sensibly do with it is hang it on the wall. Once you've ridden it, it becomes a cheap old bike that you paid a serious wedge for.

    Totally agree but would anyone want that particular bike on their wall?
    Rolf F wrote:
    Brake cable routing looks pretty conventional to me! :?

    If you look at this picture:

    IMG_9840.JPG?v=1391644298

    The routing goes up and over the bars and along the top tube. Haven't seen that before even on my or my friends' 1980s racer bikes.
  • craker
    craker Posts: 1,739
    Navrig2 wrote:
    The routing goes up and over the bars and along the top tube. Haven't seen that before even on my or my friends' 1980s racer bikes.

    It's pretty hard to make out, but in this picture of a right sh*t bike I picked up last year

    Gitane_crop.JPG

    the cable comes out of the top of the brake lever then disappears under the handlebars and along the top tube. 'Tis but a detail compared to your 'Over the bars ...'. If the cable's long enough you could probably tuck it under the bars mid ride if you wished.

    As for the titular bike, looks like an excellent fixie conversion project. Replace the wheels, cold set the dropouts. Change the crankset. Sorted.
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    Navrig2 wrote:
    Rolf F wrote:
    Navrig2 wrote:
    Love the brake cable routing!!

    You're not really paying for the componentary value but the rarity.

    If someone found a mint condition Hillman Imp it would attract silly money but would still be a heap of Scottish made rubbish.

    I would NOT buy one though.

    Trouble is, on that basis, all you can sensibly do with it is hang it on the wall. Once you've ridden it, it becomes a cheap old bike that you paid a serious wedge for.

    Totally agree but would anyone want that particular bike on their wall?
    Rolf F wrote:
    Brake cable routing looks pretty conventional to me! :?

    If you look at this picture:

    IMG_9840.JPG?v=1391644298

    The routing goes up and over the bars and along the top tube. Haven't seen that before even on my or my friends' 1980s racer bikes.

    Not a bike for the enthusiast to hang on their wall but I can see it looking good in a random city loft!

    That cable routing - my Raleighs (1980 and 86) and my dead Dawes Horizon (1990) all have that routing. I'd say it is pretty normal pre Aero hoods. Rather effective too - no cable rub and you can whip the cables out in seconds. Even swap braking from one side to the other with no fuss.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    craker wrote:
    As for the titular bike, looks like an excellent fixie conversion project. Replace the wheels, cold set the dropouts. Change the crankset. Sorted.

    That's a mighty expensive fixie conversion plus it's still be heavy and dead - for the same money you could buy a decent track bike.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,230
    The bicycle is well presented, but if you look carefully is a non rusted version of many analogous you see parked in bunches outside the stations.
    It has no merit, being made of cheap steel and carrying rather bottom of the range componentry. The steel rims are deadly, as they do slow down, but they don't actually stop you if you need to.
    for 200 quid it would be worth a punt, but 750 is serious money for an old carcass and your money can go a lot further
    left the forum March 2023
  • Moonbiker
    Moonbiker Posts: 1,706
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,230
    That's a lot better... the geometry is extremely aggressive and if you are a mamil, used to sloping frame, it can hit your hamstrings pretty hard until you get used... I personally love these frames... very racey!
    left the forum March 2023
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    Moonbiker wrote:

    But this one isn't NOS so it's just an old (but nice) bike.

    I like this one - all full of Suntour and very orange http://www.pedalpedlar.co.uk/collections/bikes-for-sale/products/57cm-bridgestone-metalic-orange-nos-racing-bike. Some of the NOS bikes are 531 - eg the Gitanes but they have ropey looking Huret mechs (though they may be fine!).
    Faster than a tent.......
  • Moonbiker
    Moonbiker Posts: 1,706
    Dunno anything about sloping geometry never tried a bike with that.

    This is my current bike unsure what type of geometry the frame has compared to other bikes etc?

    bax7ddwl.jpg?1

    Can you tell from picture?

    It weighs 11.5kg total :oops: & is LUDO brand has a cromoly 4103 frame which think must be a heavy cheap frame due toi the bikes overall weight?
  • Moonbiker
    Moonbiker Posts: 1,706
    But I was interested as to weather my frame would be classed as having an aggressive or relaxed traditional geometry?

    The most dependable indication of aggressive bike frame geometry is head-tube angle. Any angle 73.5 degrees or more is considered to be aggressive on a midsized frame.

    So suppose I could measure this angle to see.
  • Moonbiker
    Moonbiker Posts: 1,706
    Yeah the frame angle does look less than the yellow one & comparing them the fork on mine seems to have alot more more rake so longer wheel base.Drops aren't right over over the front wheel centre like the other bike.

    scan0009.jpg

    I also have this bike i think its a better spec bike but shame is frame is to big for me ( 60cm ).
  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,230
    That Duell is nice, buy it!
    left the forum March 2023
  • veronese68
    veronese68 Posts: 27,285
    That Duell is nice, buy it!
    It is lovely.
  • drlodge
    drlodge Posts: 4,826
    Any one remember the 12 speed Black Puch racing bikes? Would have been early 80s, these were quite common. In the 70s I had a Red Puch 5 speed and all the tubes were curved. Heavy as hell but very different.
    WyndyMilla Massive Attack | Rourke 953 | Condor Italia 531 Pro | Boardman CX Pro | DT Swiss RR440 Tubeless Wheels
    Find me on Strava
  • That Duell is nice, buy it!

    I definitely would!