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Archetype rim wear shock

on-yer-bikeon-yer-bike Posts: 2,974
edited March 2014 in Road buying advice
I have ridden these wheels from new since the end of April but not exclusively. I guess they've done 2500 – 3000 miles max including this winter.
I was changing the brake pads on the rear brake to discover the wear gauge hole on one side has disappeared and is just a pin censored on the other side. Campag pads in the summer and Swiss Stop black in the winter.
10 months is not long for a rim is it? Where's the best place to buy a new rim? Can I use the same spokes and nipples?
Pegoretti
Colnago
Cervelo
Campagnolo

Posts

  • Winter mileage is the killer. I make a concious effort of cleaning out my brake pads once a week to ensure no grit/metal is stuck on the pad.

    I recently had a similar shock when I needed to replace my A23 rim although it did a good 1000 miles more than yours. Not sure Archetype's are the rim of choice for long/winter mileage.

    I am sure you could reuse both spokes and nipples assuming they are not seized. The rims are the same price £55.00 everywhere so it all depends on postage costs.

    These sell them:
    Kinoko cycles
    Brick Lane Bikes
    Just riding along
  • Don't moan... if they were Ksyrium you would have lost 400 quid... instead you are getting away with a 55 pounds bill.

    Spokes can be reused if you re-rim rather than re-build, but I would replace the nipples
  • majormantramajormantra Posts: 2,094
    If you're wearing out rear rims first, I'd suggest altering your braking technique. You get far more stopping power from the front and apart from in ultra-slippery conditions, the front should be your primary brake.
  • DiscoBoyDiscoBoy Posts: 905
    If you're wearing out rear rims first, I'd suggest altering your braking technique. You get far more stopping power from the front and apart from in ultra-slippery conditions, the front should be your primary brake.

    +1
    Red bikes are the fastest.
  • ... please not another lecture on braking technique... it's really pointless... one doesn't get to the age of 40 or 50 to be told that he should change his braking technique to squeeze some more life off the rear rim :?
  • DiscoBoyDiscoBoy Posts: 905
    ... please not another lecture on braking technique... it's really pointless... one doesn't get to the age of 40 or 50 to be told that he should change his braking technique to squeeze some more life off the rear rim :?

    Rim wear isn't the only reason to use the front brake more than the rear...

    ... but I agree that it is a tedious discussion, clearly the OP isn't ploughing into things left, right and centre so there isn't a major problem.
    Red bikes are the fastest.
  • mercia_manmercia_man Posts: 1,426
    Rear rims wear out first because they get much dirtier than front rims. It's the muck on the rims and the grit and bits of metal embedded in the pads which are the main cause of wear in my experience.
  • letap73letap73 Posts: 1,608
    Don't moan... if they were Ksyrium you would have lost 400 quid... instead you are getting away with a 55 pounds bill.

    Spokes can be reused if you re-rim rather than re-build, but I would replace the nipples

    I don't think he's moaning - on this forum hand built Archetypes are heavily pushed by the experts therefore the expectation is that they would last for more than 2500 miles. My Bontrager Select wheels from 2005 have done five or six times this mileage (mostly in winter) and still have plenty of miles left in them.
  • LegendLustLegendLust Posts: 1,022
    Cleaning your rims and brake pads regularly helps with wear
  • majormantramajormantra Posts: 2,094
    Mercia Man wrote:
    Rear rims wear out first because they get much dirtier than front rims. It's the muck on the rims and the grit and bits of metal embedded in the pads which are the main cause of wear in my experience.

    Yes, but that muck only causes wear when you brake.

    The OP is getting a fraction that rim life that most would consider reasonable, so I think raising braking technique is legitimate. Sorry Ugo. :)
  • on-yer-bikeon-yer-bike Posts: 2,974
    I do use more front brake Mercia Man is correct about sh*t around the rear wheel. The front rim is pretty worn too but still has the gauges showing. The Swiss Stop blacks lasted no time at all and were full of censored . Maybe the trade off with soft compound is the fact that more debris gets stuck in them.

    Nearly 60 actually :-(
    Pegoretti
    Colnago
    Cervelo
    Campagnolo
  • on-yer-bikeon-yer-bike Posts: 2,974
    Ugo – would you have used 12 or 14mm nipples? I have loads of 14. Not sure i can measure them accurately until I dismantle the wheel.
    Pegoretti
    Colnago
    Cervelo
    Campagnolo
  • Nearly 60 actually :-(
    Yeah, your friend told me you were nearly 60, but I thought it was a joke... did you buy Micheal Jackson's hyperbaric oxygen tent at auction when he passed away or it's just Boots No. 7 cream? :wink:
  • src1src1 Posts: 301
    Spokes can be reused if you re-rim rather than re-build, but I would replace the nipples

    Hi Ugo,

    What do you mean by re-rim rather than re-build? Do you mean just transferring the new rim over without removing the spokes and re-lacing?
  • on-yer-bikeon-yer-bike Posts: 2,974
    SRC1 wrote:
    Spokes can be reused if you re-rim rather than re-build, but I would replace the nipples

    Hi Ugo,

    What do you mean by re-rim rather than re-build? Do you mean just transferring the new rim over without removing the spokes and re-lacing?
    Good question.
    Ugo, Its all the red wine I drink.
    Pegoretti
    Colnago
    Cervelo
    Campagnolo
  • SRC1 wrote:
    Spokes can be reused if you re-rim rather than re-build, but I would replace the nipples

    Hi Ugo,

    What do you mean by re-rim rather than re-build? Do you mean just transferring the new rim over without removing the spokes and re-lacing?
    Good question.
    Ugo, Its all the red wine I drink.

    Yes, that's what I mean... 12 or 14 mm nipples? Use the same I used... if they look long they are 14, if they look short they are 12... to be honest I can't remember which ones I used, I don't normally build that combination... it was a one off
  • src1src1 Posts: 301
    I've rebuilt a pair of wheels using the old spokes and didn't get any problems. I did make sure i separated outside and inside spokes as well as ds/NDS.

    What's the worry with a rebuild vs. a re-rim?
  • on-yer-bikeon-yer-bike Posts: 2,974
    SRC1 wrote:
    I've rebuilt a pair of wheels using the old spokes and didn't get any problems. I did make sure i separated outside and inside spokes as well as ds/NDS.

    What's the worry with a rebuild vs. a re-rim?
    Whats the technique? Presumably you dont remove the spokes from the hub…
    Pegoretti
    Colnago
    Cervelo
    Campagnolo
  • majormantramajormantra Posts: 2,094
    Detension original wheel, tape new rim to old rim. Transfer spokes one by one. Remove old rim. Tension 'new' wheel.
  • src1src1 Posts: 301
    SRC1 wrote:
    I've rebuilt a pair of wheels using the old spokes and didn't get any problems. I did make sure i separated outside and inside spokes as well as ds/NDS.

    What's the worry with a rebuild vs. a re-rim?
    Whats the technique? Presumably you dont remove the spokes from the hub…

    I did remove all the spokes for a couple of reasons. 1st to practice and secondly so I could give the hubs and spokes a good clean.

    I realise it's a lot quicker to re-rim, but I wasn't aware there was any problem re-building with the original spokes.
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    I would use a softer pad. Maybe the swiss stop are not that soft after all. Campagnolo pads can be rather harsh on rims.

    I would use ad do use Kool stop salmon or Aztec road plus pads for winter riding. I have yet to wear out the light weight DT Swiss's I have on my winter bike yet after more miles than you have done. I think that is the best solution for you. I do go through pads quite quickly though but it better than wearig rims out.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
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