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What tools shall I buy

wannabecyclistwannabecyclist Posts: 149
edited March 2014 in Road buying advice
Hi, I am getting better at doing basic maintenance of my bike so want to start doing more work on it myself rather than paying my local bike shops as their prices seem to be going up and up. SO if I want to install new/upgraded parts such as cassettes, chainrings and chains what tools should I buy. Is there one large tool box that you have that came with most required tools. I do have a chainwhip and shimano attachment. What others things shall I buy if I want to start looking after the hubs/wheels better like greasing the ballbearings.

Posts

  • arran77arran77 Posts: 9,260
    I've just built up another bike and did it myself for the first time.

    There's not too much needed to be honest unless you want to start doing anything really specialist.

    You'll probably get away with the following depending on the parts you have on your bike;

    Set of allen keys (and maybe torx keys).
    Chain whip.
    Chain splitting tool.
    Cable / wire cutters.
    Pedal spanner (if you're pedals don't have an allen bolt on the back).
    Crankset / bottom bracket removal tool.

    It doesn't cost too much and once you have them you're set up for the future.
    "Arran, you are like the Tony Benn of smut. You have never diluted your depravity and always stand by your beliefs. You have my respect sir and your wife my pity" :lol:

    seanoconn
  • Planet X do a nice little kit "Jobsworth", think its about £25, might be worth a look on there.
  • Phil_DPhil_D Posts: 467
    Planet X do a nice little kit "Jobsworth", think its about £25, might be worth a look on there.

    Halfords do one also. I have one and have found it to be more than adequate.
  • I would love to be able to replace the gear/brake cables as the parts are quite cheap and you don't need tools other than the cable cutter from what I can tell, how long did it take you to learn to do that? It looks like a nightmare yet I bet once you know what you are doing it doesn't take too long. Feeding it through should be fine, it is getting it under the handlebar wraps and in to handles to tie up I can't work out.
  • arran77arran77 Posts: 9,260
    Actually changing gear or brake cables is not hard but like you say there are the other bits to do as well such as indexing the gears and getting cables under the bar tape.

    Lots of videos online showing you how to do all these things and once you've not once or twice you're away :wink:
    "Arran, you are like the Tony Benn of smut. You have never diluted your depravity and always stand by your beliefs. You have my respect sir and your wife my pity" :lol:

    seanoconn
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    I would love to be able to replace the gear/brake cables as the parts are quite cheap and you don't need tools other than the cable cutter from what I can tell, how long did it take you to learn to do that? It looks like a nightmare yet I bet once you know what you are doing it doesn't take too long. Feeding it through should be fine, it is getting it under the handlebar wraps and in to handles to tie up I can't work out.

    You take off the bar tape if you're replacing outers as well as inner cables. Generally use that as an excuse for nice new bar tape too.

    Have a look on YouTube for vids of people recabling bikes and taping bars
  • Planet X do a nice little kit "Jobsworth", think its about £25, might be worth a look on there.

    Yeah that looks good thanks. It is £30 now and I have some of the tools already but nice to have them in a tool box in correct compartments. Can always keep the duplicate tools such as chainwhip as spares, not really worth the hassle of selling them on.

    Wish I found this forum a year ago, would have saved me a load of money!
  • rafletcherrafletcher Posts: 1,235
    The Park Tools site has some really good stuff (not video), but when I'm taping bars it's easier to refer to a printout of the page than watch a video!

    I've got...

    Allen Keys
    Torx keys (increasingly ergos/sti's use torx fixings)
    Cable cutter
    Dremel (works well for cleaning up the cut end of cable outers, shortening stainless mudguard stays etc.)
    Headset press (works on press fit BB's too) and headset remover (ditto)
    Assorted Philips and flat bladed screwdrivers.
    Torque wrench (low range) for torqueing stuff up on carbon bike builds. A BBB one, comes with a selection of bits.
    Carbon assembly paste
    Greases (lithium and others)
    Pedal spanner (gets more leverage than the allen key)
    Cone spanners (for wheels with adjustable bearings)
    Assorted pliers
    Adjustable spanner plus assorted small ring and open ended spanners.
    Stanley knife
    Scissors
    Spirit level (for saddle, and making sure levers are level on bars)
    Various BB removal spanners and crank extractors collected over the years.
    Tyre levers (trying not to use them!)
    Chain splitter (I always use "missing links" to re-join - KMC or SRAM or Wipperman/Connex)
    Spoke key (various)
    Valve core removal tool + Conti tube sealant.

    All in a small Stanley Tools toolbox :D
  • rafletcher wrote:
    The Park Tools site has some really good stuff (not video), but when I'm taping bars it's easier to refer to a printout of the page than watch a video!

    I've got...

    Allen Keys
    Torx keys (increasingly ergos/sti's use torx fixings)
    Cable cutter
    Dremel (works well for cleaning up the cut end of cable outers, shortening stainless mudguard stays etc.)
    Headset press (works on press fit BB's too) and headset remover (ditto)
    Assorted Philips and flat bladed screwdrivers.
    Torque wrench (low range) for torqueing stuff up on carbon bike builds. A BBB one, comes with a selection of bits.
    Carbon assembly paste
    Greases (lithium and others)
    Pedal spanner (gets more leverage than the allen key)
    Cone spanners (for wheels with adjustable bearings)
    Assorted pliers
    Adjustable spanner plus assorted small ring and open ended spanners.
    Stanley knife
    Scissors
    Spirit level (for saddle, and making sure levers are level on bars)
    Various BB removal spanners and crank extractors collected over the years.
    Tyre levers (trying not to use them!)
    Chain splitter (I always use "missing links" to re-join - KMC or SRAM or Wipperman/Connex)
    Spoke key (various)
    Valve core removal tool + Conti tube sealant.

    All in a small Stanley Tools toolbox :D

    Wow some of those I haven't even heard of. Did it take a few years to build it up, eg just buy the tool when required? For example I have no idea why I would need a chain splitter but should I buy one or wait.
  • arlowoodarlowood Posts: 2,538
    Chain splitter needed to remove chains that do not have a quick link connector device eg KMC and the like. However even when you buy a new KMC chain you will inevitably need to adjust it to size by removing links. You can only do this with a chain splitter.

    Word of advice - buy a good quality splitter eg this
    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/cy/e ... p-prod2924

    Cheap ones will only cause you grief
  • JayKostaJayKosta Posts: 635
    I suggest buying only the tools you really need to do a particular job.
    Many of the 'bike specific' tools make the job easier and quicker, but aren't absolutely required.

    Jay Kosta
    Endwell NY USA
  • arran77arran77 Posts: 9,260
    JayKosta wrote:
    I suggest buying only the tools you really need to do a particular job.
    Many of the 'bike specific' tools make the job easier and quicker, but aren't absolutely required.

    Jay Kosta
    Endwell NY USA

    Definitely, one of these does most jobs....

    S0607_V2.jpg

    :lol:
    "Arran, you are like the Tony Benn of smut. You have never diluted your depravity and always stand by your beliefs. You have my respect sir and your wife my pity" :lol:

    seanoconn
  • DiscoBoyDiscoBoy Posts: 905
    I have the Halfords kit, and have only seen the Jobsworth kit, but my impression is that the Jobsworth kit seems better made.
    Red bikes are the fastest.
  • jeffladjefflad Posts: 315
    I started with an Aldi tool box when they have their specials on... some of the tools have lasted surprisingly well. Just added to it with better parts over time but still a lot of the originals left. Think the cost was something like £20, not too bad to get started.
  • mercia_manmercia_man Posts: 1,426
    I think buying good quality tools as and when you need them rather than buying a cheapo kit with tools you may never need is the best way to go. Some of these cheap kits have tools such as Allen keys made of soft metal which easily rounds off. High quality tools are a pleasure to use.

    You can do most jobs on a bike with a set of Allen keys, an adjustable spanner and standard and Phillips screwdriver.

    You already have a chain whip for changing cassettes with the help of a large adjustable spanner and cassette tool. You might want to get a crank extractor and bottom bracket tool specific to your bike to enable you to replace worn bottom brackets.

    For adjusting and greasing wheel bearings on standard cup and cone Shimano wheels, a pair of cone spanners will do the job. One of those small grease guns which screw onto a tube of grease would also be useful but not essential.

    Changing brake and gear cables is pretty straightforward but it can be a fiddle getting cable lengths right and removing and replacing bar tape. My top tip for that is to buy a set of high quality cable cutters. I have a Shimano TL CT10 bought years ago. It makes the job so much easier.

    As for chain tools, I use the ones on my Park, Halfords and Topeak multi-tools. All work well on nine and 10 speed chains although I have never tried them on an 11 speed. A pedal spanner is fantastic for getting off tight pedals if they are the sort with a flat for a spanner.
  • mercia_manmercia_man Posts: 1,426
    Yeah, they're good. I reckon high quality cable cutters are my best ever buy in tools.

    You should also consider getting a decent spoke key so you can get rid of any wobbles in your wheels. You don't have to use any special stands. It's perfectly possible to do it by turning your bike upside down, spinning the wheels and using your brake blocks, a screwdriver held against a stay or fork or something like a roofing tack blue tacked onto the stay or fork to check how straight you are getting your rims.
  • IShaggyIShaggy Posts: 301
    After way too many years of rounding allen key bolts using basic allen keys, I bought some proper ones -

    TOJWAKHX_P1.jpg

    Best thing I've bought in ages!
  • rozzer32rozzer32 Posts: 3,606
    Definitely get a good workstand. Makes your life so much easier!
    ***** Pro Tour Pundit Champion 2020, 2018, 2017 & 2011 *****
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