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RS Monarch RT3... PUSH tuned?

micedenmiceden Posts: 225
edited February 2014 in MTB general
Anyone on here with a Monarch RT3 that's had it PUSH tuned by TF, noticeable performance increase?

Reason I ask - my new frameset (FTM Carbon) came with an RT3, on past experiences I wasnt all that impressed with this shock, they were ok and did the job but like my grandfather used to say - "I wouldn't travel for it"

The FTM has a funny/older i2i rear shock length of 195mm, except for a RP2 or DT XM there isn't a lot out there with that i2i length that I've been able to find. I might still switch to the rp2 or xm but want to know if the PUSH tuning is worth looking into.

Cheers!

Posts

  • DCR00DCR00 Posts: 2,160
    I havent had a Monarch pushed, but my RP23 on my last bike was

    I would argue that PUSH is nearly always "worth" doing as you get the shock tuned specifically for you. It will have a greater impact on say an aftermarket shock, that has a generic tune, versus one that has been tuned for that frame.

    Have you ridden the shock ?
  • Check they still offer Push tunes for Monarchs as Push themselves don't.
  • micedenmiceden Posts: 225
    According to tftuned's website they still do push tuning for 2008+ monarchs... And no I've not tried my shock yet as the bike isnt built, still need a few parts, my experience with rt3's are based on two friends bikes and a hire bike - not an ideal test bench I know but I did change air pressure, set sag on each.
  • miceden wrote:
    According to tftuned's website they still do push tuning for 2008+ monarchs... And no I've not tried my shock yet as the bike isnt built, still need a few parts, my experience with rt3's are based on two friends bikes and a hire bike - not an ideal test bench I know but I did change air pressure, set sag on each.

    Website might not be 100% up to date.
  • POAHPOAH Posts: 3,369
    it may be that TF still have some of the bits to push the monarchs but they will be the older shocks. if its a new 2014 one you are out of luck. however, the monarch uses a "simple" shim system so you can still tune it for your bike/weight etc. You can even do it yourself if you can be arsed.
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    Monarchs can still be tuned by TF. I spoke to them last week about getting my 2014 Monarch RCT3 tuned for more end stroke low speed compression. They told me that there's a lot they can do with a Monarch
  • micedenmiceden Posts: 225
    Time to have a chat with TF then... Thanks for the help and advice
  • DCR00DCR00 Posts: 2,160
    I spoke to them last week about getting my 2014 Monarch RCT3 tuned for more end stroke low speed compression.

    Just curious, why would you want that ?
  • POAHPOAH Posts: 3,369
    DCR00 wrote:
    I spoke to them last week about getting my 2014 Monarch RCT3 tuned for more end stroke low speed compression.

    Just curious, why would you want that ?


    maybe he means high speed
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    I want to stop it using full stroke in heavy compressions and landing big jumps. It's not too bad but I want it to ramp up a bit more.
  • isnt that high speed compression, big hits?
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    No. High speed compression takes care of the high frequency bumps, like riding over roots at higher speed.
    Jump landings and G out compressions are relatively low speed.
  • I'd say heavy landings is high speed though, maybe yoyr description is misleading.
    Low speed would be a landing perfectly onto a transition or riding "wavy" fast flowing trail as the stantions will move more slowly.
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    High speed compression does nothing for heavy landings. Usually jumps are on to a transition but they can still use a fair amount of low speed compression damping to keep the rear under control.
    Relative to hitting a root section fast the hit from a landing is pretty slow.
  • SRAM would disagree..
    "launched drop to transition landing = 6 clicks of high speed compression damping to maximise landing control and handling"
    "launched drop to flat landing = 10 clicks of high speed compression damping to maximise landing control and handling and minimise harsh bottom out"
  • DCR00DCR00 Posts: 2,160
    This is where the term "speed" is relatively confusing. High speed doesnt really refer to how fast the fork is moving. Reality is that high speed compression damping only really works towards the end of the stroke, where as low speed dampong is at the start.
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 15,247
    My CCDB seems to work the other way with high speed compression working more at the start of the stroke and low speed deeper in the travel. The advice that I need more low speed on my Monarch came from a suspension technician.
    I have very little compression at all in my Boxxers because I can't seem to get hold of a medium spring and the firm is too stiff.
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    The thing is there is low speed damping... high speed damping... and every speed of damping in between. This is what hopefully tuning will do for you. And of course it has to work in tandem with your suspension design and spring characteristics.
  • Kowalski675Kowalski675 Posts: 4,412
    supersonic wrote:
    The thing is there is low speed damping... high speed damping... and every speed of damping in between. This is what hopefully tuning will do for you.

    And you'll get to discuss what you need with somebody who actually understands suspension, rather than thinks they do...
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