Forum home Mountain biking forum MTB beginners

Just bought my first bike.

TheWheelsonthebusTheWheelsonthebus Posts: 15
edited April 2014 in MTB beginners
Hi, I just bought my first bike and was wondering if it was any good?

I have been given crappy bikes in the past for free, which have eventually just been worn out, one being a extremely heavy barracuda FS bike which was sadly stolen and recovered by police in a 2nd hand shop 6 months later ( not safe to ride )

I don't know much about bikes, but decided to purchase a Specialized hard rock sport disk ( I think it might be 2009 )
and was wondering if it was any good, it will be used every other day or so, mainly on flat terrain with the odd muddy rocky trail.

I can see already that a lot of people say that the forks are terrible, but surly they can not be half as bad as some of the free bikes people have just handed to me, as this bike has disk brakes is there anything I should be aware of since all my past bikes just had brake pads with the cables hardly pulling resorting into having to drag my feet to a standstill.

is their Any point buying expensive locks, since any junkie with bolt cutters can get through it like a bread knife can get through bread.

I don't have much money to do much and to be honest I would have no idea where to start, I still need to learn how to fix punctures :oops: I would normally just get a puncture and get a new tube fitted or give the bike to the next person.
:lol:

Also, as the bike cost me £200.00 ( not much compared to most peoples bike on this forum but a lot to me )what would be a good way to stop thief's from getting their mucky paws on it, my heavy bike had a U lock and 2 cable locks on it, the thief still managed to take it leaving me to clean up the locks, But I will be bringing the bike in-doors and would only need to lock it if I pop down to town for a few bits and bats.

I checked the serial number and it has no records of being stolen, I will register it when it finally get's delivered. how often do I need to clean it? can you jet wash it? as people said it will kill the bearings, do you really need those fancy chain cleaners, sprays or will a bucket of soapy water and a sponge do the trick, the same apply s with the oil can simple WD40 oil the chain? or is the expensive lubricant a must?

I plan on taking good care of her as long as it doesn't cost me an arm and a leg.

P.S I have about £100.00 left in my bank, that's w/o any food for the week.

Any help in appreciated.
«1

Posts

  • It's going to be a hell of a lot better than the Barracuda. Avoid jet wash as the high pressure will get into bearings. A bucket of hot water and a spot of fairy liquid will do for cleaning. Just rinse. Wd 40 is not really a lubricant and is best avoided .get it on disc brakes and it's not good news.

    Guides on this site under workshop and tech will help you with maintenance. I do all my own via links on the net and advice on here. It's not that difficult.

    The time bikes are nicked is when you have just popped to the shop and thinks it's fine. I would use 2 good d locks ( not cables as as you say they are easily cut ) good idea to get proper chain lube as it's fase economy not to. An old toothbrush works as well as as a special chain cleaning tool.

    There may be some who say the bike is rubbish , ignore , after all we can't all have an Aston Martin .
  • mak3mmak3m Posts: 1,469
    As above lube for the chain is a must keeps everything snappy and will increase the life of your kit.

    WD40 polarises people but everyone agrees keep it away from your brakes. When ive done a lot of road miles and built up some grease on chain etc I like to strip it off with wd40 give it a wash and relube, other peeps would probably recomend a proper chain degreaser but I find wd40 lasts longer and is cheaper, just keep it away from your other components.

    Muc Off is brilliant but a little washing up liquid, hot water and a bit of elbow grease gets the same result. I got a baby bottle cleaning kit from a supermarket, very cheap. Comes with a few brushes that are excellant at getting in all the nooks and crannies trail muck gathers in

    always rinse and dry your bike, dont be tempted to pressure wash your bike as you can get water in your bearings etc.

    I always have a can of gt85 for after the wash to displace any water that can sit in your components, nuts etc to keep them rust/tarnish free.

    With regards to security, you are perfectly correct a determined bike thief can get through anything, only thing you can do is slow them down, make them think of going for an easier target. A good d-lock is your best bet. They can cost a ridiculous amont of money, as much as your bike, but anything over the £20 mark should see you ok
  • Fixing a puncture..........

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pWZGMMZwaNs
    Paracyclist
    @Bigmitch_racing
    2010 Specialized Tricross (commuter)
    2014 Whyte T129-S
    2016 Specialized Tarmac Ultegra Di2
    Big Mitch - YouTube
  • Fairy liquid? I use that for taking grease off plate
  • Thank you for your reply's guys I appreciate it.

    I am not 100% sure if the bike is 2009 or not, it is a 19inch frame, hopefully that is suitable for me I am 5ft 10. ( Legs are much longer than my upper body ) looks good as new.

    As for security, I purchased a new D lock ( It's only about 1kg and 16mm thickness )
    Would I need a 2nd U lock? if so would I use the 2nd U lock on the frame and back wheel as-well.

    I picked up some cheap crappy cable combination locks, I plan to just fasten the seat post down with them ( If it is a quick release ) to prevent the opportunist thief.

    Also, my wife gave me her cable lock with a flat key ( she knows more about bikes than me :oops: I think her bike cost her about £900, it's been sat in the basement for years ( some how the back tire has become stiff )

    * Will a waterproof cover discourage thief's* or make them more likely to take a look under.

    I will take a look at the guides for beginners on the website this weekend.

    Is it illegal to ride on the pavement in England? I don't drive nor do I know much about the roads therefore being extra cautious on a busy round about would not only result in a danger for myself but other road users, if the road is quiet then no problem, I don't trust drivers especially ones who are running 10 min late for work on the phone to their boss whilst speeding.

    I won't be using wd40 then, I will dig deep and buy some lube :) is Wet or Dry recommended? bearing in mind I live in the not so sunny UK.

    I will steer clear from the jet wash, I like your idea of baby sterilizer equipment, I can steal my 11 months old :lol:
    Hopefully the wife wont notice it has gone, If she say's anything I will take her toothbrush and see how she likes that.

    What equipment is essential to carry in your backpack?

    Allen keys, pump,puncture kit, inner tube, ( those plastic things to take the tire off )

    I will stop there as it seems like I am writing a boring essay and no body will want to read it :lol:

    Thanks for your help.
  • P.S Should I avoid Halfords? heard this a-lot.
  • My experience with halfords has been fine. Pretty good for spare parts , chain lube etc. Having said that you could use a local bike shop, , it's handy developing a good relationship with them.
    Cycling on pavement is illegal. I often get off the bike at busy junctions .
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Read Parktools, link below, and all you need bike shops for is stuff. Most of which you can get online.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • mak3mmak3m Posts: 1,469
    Back pack contents look good, at some point you might want to get a small multi tool for repairs on the fly

    Wet or Dry really depends on your rides. As it says on the tin with the lube. I only tend to use wet during the heaviest winter months, most of the time I use dry, no expert but i seem to get away with with ;)
  • stubsstubs Posts: 5,001
    If your going to be doing lots of wet miles get a waterproof pouch to put your phone and wallet in. I have killed a phone during a ride didnt realise it was swimming about in a puddle in my rucsack.

    Your bikes not the worst and is a good solid frame that should last you years. The bits attached to it will wear out but they are easily replaced.
    Fig rolls: proof that god loves cyclists and that she wants us to do another lap
  • Thank you guy's, I have decided to name her referring to my bike Orianna ''Sad i know''

    I will purchase ''Finish line'' wet and dry lube. was surprised how small their lube was but after watching videos it seems like you only need to apply a very small amount to the chain, so I suppose it doesn't cost too much in the long run. I will buy some of that GT spray also I don't want to get rust on Orianna

    I will take a look at Parktools.

    If it rains really bad, I will have to cover my backpack in a bin liner, I will have a look on ebay for a waterproof pouch if not, mountain warehouse might have something similar and they are a few minutes walk from my house. mind due my mobile phone is about 10 years old and held together with Duct tape, isn't that stuff waterproof :lol:

    I have been watching some videos on youtube and noticed how careless some people can be( Bikers and cars) especially when it comes to opening their car doors w/o checking mirrors, is it OK to ride in the middle of the lane if there are parked cars as you never know, they could swing it open at any time, plus some of the gutter/drains are a pain to ride over with quite big drops where I live.

    It is my understanding that undertaking is overtaking cars on the left side instead of the right, I hear mixed feelings about this, should I as a cyclist be undertaking if approaching a red light or busy/stationary traffic? or is this a dangerous thing to do, maybe cars wont be able to see me. ( Hard to say, I don't drive )

    I am not sure if any of you cycle to work, if anybody does, do you know how to avoid turning up to work dripping in sweat, If the weather is bad I will be covered in waterproofs and most likely carry my work shoes in my backpack along with a dry pair of socks, I don't think it would be very nice to work with a sweaty co worker. :cry:

    I was thinking of the obvious, baby wipes and deodorant the fitter I get the less I will sweat but I haven't been on a bike for about a year and a half now,I quit smoking 6 months ago which might help. I miss the icy cold wind hitting my face, especially after a nice clean shave in the morning.

    Hargreaves Cycles is only a couple of miles away, has anybody used them before for parts or servicing?
    http://www.hargreaves-cycles.co.uk/

    I presume that the most efficient option is to buy spare parts online and fit them yourself. ( if you know how to of-course )

    Would you recommend removing specialized stickers and replacing them with personalized stickers to deter thief's.
    are Gps tracking systems worth the money and hassle? or would that only be an option for a bike over £1000


    Thank you for your help. btw has anybody else named there bike anything ? or am I the only weirdo.
  • Save yourself some money, use sealable sandwich bags instead of a waterproof pouch they work well for phones and money etc.

    I have given up with wet lube, it is much more sticky and so I always ended up with more censored on my chain, All chain oil is water-soluble anyway so I stick to dry lube and reapply after every clean.

    As far as cycling to work, try and leave as much there as possible. If you only use your work shoes at work then why transport them every day they are likely to be the heaviest thing you need at work.

    If your backpack doesn't have a rain cover why not just put the things that need to stay dry in plastic bags? Less annoying that trying to keep a bin bag wrapped around the outside of your backpack.

    I wouldn't leave my mountain bikes locked anywhere outside, does your place of work have a storage room or warehouse that you could use?
  • Thanks for the commute tips, sadly there is no where to store my back at work, the closest place is the railway station, they have cctv and bike stands ( but I do not trust them )

    Took the bike out for 10 miles ride today, it was so nice compared to my old heavy piece of metal, the only problem is, the wheels have quick release skewers and the seat post is also quick release :(

    Another major problem I am having is working out the LAST number of the serial code, I can not tell if it ends is the number 0 or the letter D. driving me crazy.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    Took the bike out for 10 miles ride today, it was so nice compared to my old heavy piece of metal, the only problem is, the wheels have quick release skewers and the seat post is also quick release :(
    Bolted options are readily available for both, the Halo bolted wheel skewers are very nice and not at all expensive, I have a few spare seatpost clamps in the 2 main sizes, PM me and I'll do you one for the price of the postage.
  • Get one of these, cheap but solid as a rock!

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/VALIANT-Motorbi ... chain+lock
  • Managed to get lock in skewers and seat clamp, it's getting fitted for free on Sunday however, they mentioned to open them up you need to use a key which is worrying.

    Also ordered Finish Line Dry Teflon Lube and it seems to be doing it's job very well.

    A Garden 8 ltr pump sprayer to clean my bike as I don#t have a hose and bucket(s) of water are not appreciated by my other half, I am either in or out of the house :P
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    A key or an 'allen key' which is a hexagonal piece of bar and works just like a socket on a bolt in reverse (the allen key is the male part, the allen bolt the female) readily available from practically anywhere.
  • I presume it is an Allen key, I can't imagine a set of keys to unlock a tire, By the shape of key and the bolt, it is quite funny that one is male the other female.

    Have been looking at cheap sets of Multitools then stumbled across a Park multitool for about £7-£8. is this a bargain? as most of their products seem rather expensive, any difference in a park multi tool compared to a pound shop Multi tool.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Parktools stuff is good, but my two most used tools was one on special at Sainsburys for £1.99 and a freebie from one of the magazines.

    But the Parktool will likely last longer and be made of better steel.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • thanks.

    just had my first accident whilst going to collect my parcel, wind was really strong and threw me into the other side of the road, lukily no cars, thought i broke my wrist as it has gone slighlty blue, but i can move it slightly.

    I took my gloves off because I was too warm and now have a cup of pure sea salt on the wounds, my brand new helmet is pretty scratched now :( and my chin/cheek has battle scars.

    Thank god the bike is ok, handle bars needed a quick adjust and the chain came off, other than that it seems good. I the worst part was having to carry a big box home with a sprained wrist, it was immpossible to zip up my bag :P

    I wonder if it is because I am used to heavy bikes and this bike is 2-3x lighter :s

    sorry for horrific grammer, typing with one hand and the other is salted ice.
  • Dang...

    My front Wheel is now not straight in line, it hardly spins now :(

    trying to work out how to repair, is it anything to do with the spoke nipples?

    :(
  • stubsstubs Posts: 5,001
    Dang...

    My front Wheel is now not straight in line, it hardly spins now :(

    trying to work out how to repair, is it anything to do with the spoke nipples?

    :(

    Yes and a bit of no. Take wheel to a bike shop and get it trued should cost between 10 and 20 quid. Or you could get yourself a spoke key watch a load of Youtube vids and read as much as you can on tinterweb and have a go yourself. As long as your not too hamfisted if you do censored it up the bikeshop should be able to get it back.
    Fig rolls: proof that god loves cyclists and that she wants us to do another lap
  • Thanks, I am suppose to collect lock-in skewers from the bike shop on Sunday, I will see how much it will cost, if it is going to cost a fortune I will have to have a go myself.

    They should be able to provide me with the right size spoke key,is it safe to ride 1 mile with the wheel out of place? or am I going to have to push it?

    Could there be another reason why the wheel is out of place other than the spokes? the wheel now jiltz side to side slightly, the handle bars were bent when I fell, not sure if that information helps or not I just don't want to fix one thing then end up finding another :(

    Very annoyed with myself that I have damaged the bike already.
  • Watching this video, it look's relativity simple, patience and time is required by the look's of things.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q6eOamGK2tY
    All that being said, I never seem to have luck fixing things so I am still in two minds what to do here.

    I will have to take a good look at the wheel with the bike on its back, if it is only a couple of spokes I may give it a go, if everything is all over the shot I will try both bike shops and accept the best price.

    :oops:
  • rbb1rbb1 Posts: 1
    halfords is really a good bike. what's good about is that you can find separate parts easily. I bought minbe on amazon it was a good experience to change my old bike that was notprofessional at all. About 1 year right now and still love halfords i got no complains.

    rubber band bracelets
  • buddy_clubbuddy_club Posts: 935
    rbb1 wrote:
    halfords is really a good bike. what's good about is that you can find separate parts easily. I bought minbe on amazon it was a good experience to change my old bike that was notprofessional at all. About 1 year right now and still love halfords i got no complains.

    rubber band bracelets
    :lol: Wtf
    Framebuilder
    Handbuilt Steel 29er https://goo.gl/RYSbaa
    Carbon Stumpjumper https://goo.gl/xJNFcv
    Parkwood:http://goo.gl/Gf8xkL
    Ribble Gran Fondo https://goo.gl/ZpTFXz
    Triban:http://goo.gl/v63FBB
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    buddy_club wrote:
    rbb1 wrote:
    halfords is really a good bike. what's good about is that you can find separate parts easily. I bought minbe on amazon it was a good experience to change my old bike that was notprofessional at all. About 1 year right now and still love halfords i got no complains.

    rubber band bracelets
    :lol: Wtf
    Either a bit weird or a pretty rubbish spammer.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • Chunkers1980Chunkers1980 Posts: 8,035
    What does the link do?
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    A blog or something in pidgin English about rubber band bracelets. What did you think?
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    For example:

    Useful for more than one purpose Rubber Band Bracelets

    Rubber Band Fashion

    - Wear usually band as bracelets or join them to make a necklace.

    - Tie them up to form a t-shirt. Simply join bands together to form a string then knit them together…or Just join them by tying the possibilities are endless. Off course you may need a lot of silly bandz to make a t shirt so this is something you can do if you have a lot of bandz and are not sure what to do with them.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
Sign In or Register to comment.