Wheelsize Query

rsmaybury
rsmaybury Posts: 16
edited February 2014 in Road beginners
Hi,

I'm a newbie to road biking and have a question which may seem a bit dumb ? Just purchased a 56 cm Claude Butler San Remo 2013 Road Bike. The tyres on the bike are 700 x 23c.

I was a bit surprised about how hard the ride the bike is.......I've read some reports on the web that you can increase the tyre size to give you a more stable and comfortable ride - is this correct ?

If so, is there a limit I could increase the tyre sizes on the current wheels. For example 700 x 25 c - could I even go up to 700 x 30c ? Also would I need larger inner tubes ?

Many Thanks,

Comments

  • pinno
    pinno Posts: 51,301
    What make of tyres are you riding? Michelins/Continental ride more softly than some of the cheaper options - Vittoria twin thread for example.
    I think you would easily get away with 25mm but there is no substitute for decent quality tyres. Latex inner tubes help. I ride 25mm's with 700x20-22c latex inner tubes which fit just fine. You can also pump the 25's to 110psi and retain the ride quality.
    Aluminium frames can be a little stiff and the CB has a 'hefty' steel fork which is probably unforgiving and for a good upgrade, maybe think of changing them fir carbon one's.

    £60 on fleabay:

    !BmFjukwB2k~$(KGrHqEOKicEtkBE6jB0BLeWSORdp!~~_12.JPG

    or
    Ambrosio (£40.00):

    miBxZGT2HUxjkIml5Ow43XQ.jpg
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    Can you provide a link to these forks, I'm in the market for one.
  • Bobbinogs
    Bobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    OP, yes, there is a max size of tyre you can fit. This will be determined primarily by the internal rim width and also the bike geometry. This site explains the concept about rim size and also gives a helpful table but you may need to get a ruler out or callipers if there isn't a size stamped on the rim somewhere, e.g., 622x15 where 15mm is the rim width:
    http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html

    I would suspect you could fit 25 or 28 without much hassle but check your frame for clearance (which is where geo comes in).

    However, before you do all that... what tyre pressure are you running? That will be the biggest factor and is dependent on your weight. The tyres will have a min and max pressure stamped on them but you need go find the optimum for you...the lowest pressure for your weight before pinchflats.

    As a guide, I am 65kg and run 23 or 25mm tyres. Pressure is 85f/95r for 23s, about 5-10 lower for 25. Conditions have a factor too (little less pressure in the rain), I also go a little higher on the front on hilly routes, etc.

    Another thing to consider, sounds basic but are you wearing decent padded shorts? Padded gloves can also make a big difference.

    Carbon forks can make a small difference but they mainly smooth road buzz. You could also look at a carbon seatpost (ideally 27.2mm with a shim where needed)...but first and foremost check your tyre pressure.

    Oh, and inner tubes do have a range which is marked on them, like 20-28, to show the range of tyres they will work with.
  • pinno
    pinno Posts: 51,301
    sjmclean wrote:
    Can you provide a link to these forks, I'm in the market for one.

    e-bay.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • rafletcher
    rafletcher Posts: 1,235
    rsmaybury wrote:
    Hi,

    I'm a newbie to road biking and have a question which may seem a bit dumb ? Just purchased a 56 cm Claude Butler San Remo 2013 Road Bike. The tyres on the bike are 700 x 23c.

    I was a bit surprised about how hard the ride the bike is.......I've read some reports on the web that you can increase the tyre size to give you a more stable and comfortable ride - is this correct ?

    If so, is there a limit I could increase the tyre sizes on the current wheels. For example 700 x 25 c - could I even go up to 700 x 30c ? Also would I need larger inner tubes ?

    Many Thanks,

    The bit I've highlighted may also be pertinent. if you're not used to it, almost any road bike ride will be "hard" - it just chages by degrees with things like farme and fork materials and geometry, tyre sizes and pressures etc. You will find that, with more riding, the ride seems less hard. At leat I hope so! :)
  • Thanks all
    Tyres are kenda as supplied would you upgrade ?
  • In terms of pressures I have 70psi in back and 60psi in front. Tyre says max pressure
    Is 100psi kenda tyres. I guess they need pumping
    Up how much more thanks ?
  • Bobbinogs
    Bobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    errmmm, I think you completely missed the point :)
  • dj58
    dj58 Posts: 2,217
    Those pressures are at the lower end of the range for a 23mm wide tyre, if you pump them up the ride will become harsher, however unless we know your body weight you can't be advised of your options. Your bike has clearances for mudguards so should at least be able to take 25mm, maybe 28mm tyres , but again you need to know how wide the wheel rim is and what the frame clearances are before you can be given a definitive answer.
  • Ok height of 1.8m and weight 9 stone
  • dj58
    dj58 Posts: 2,217
    At your weight you may get away with those pressures, depends on the condition of the roads you ride on. Fitting larger section tyres will help with ride comfort up to a point, the pressures that you decide to use can only be determined by you through experimentation. To low and you risk pinch flats, to high a harsher ride.

    Is it your first road bike? If so as already highlighted, it may be a case of riding more to become accustomed to it.
    As to the maximum width tyre you can fit, again that depends on the width of the wheel rim and the available fork/frame clearances. If you are not sure about this and you purchased the bike from a local shop, go back and ask their advice.
  • Thanks all will do and yes it's my first road bike
  • Ok pumped up to 100psi changed saddle and invested in decent cycling shorts.
    Much better ride despite getting soaked this morning.

    thanks all
  • Bigger tyres (preferably 28+ if possible) at lower pressure (60-80psi) makes for nicer ride quality, as well as better traction. Changing forks is generally a waste of money, too - by the time you've bought fork, headset and paid to have it fitted, you still won't have got rid of the road buzz completely.