Waterproof gloves

earth
earth Posts: 934
edited January 2014 in Road buying advice
Short of wearing a pair of marigolds, do waterproof cycling gloves really exist?

I've had a few pairs of insulated 'waterproof' gloves and they all follow the same illogical formula.

The outer is showerproof at most. Beneath this there is the insulating layer - some foamed material generally. Beneath this is a waterproofing layer of PU (a plastic bag). Then the gloves inner liner. So rain gets through the showerproof layer and is soaked up by the insulating layer. Your hands may not get wet from the rain but they start to freeze because they are now surrounded by cold water instead of insulation.

Why don't they put the PU layer immediately beneath the outer so that the insulating layer stays dry? If the insulating layer soaks up sweat then put two PU layers in the glove - directly above and below the insulation.
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Comments

  • The only worthwhile cycling glove to get in wet situations is one made from neoprene. The gloves will get wet, and so will your hands but combined they keep your digits warm throughout the ride. A 'waterproof' glove on the other hand is IMO totally pointless.

    I went out today in the pi$$ing rain and freezing cold wind with my Assos S7 Rain Gloves on. Came home with warm (but damp) hands, turned the gloves inside out to dry and they'll be ready to go for tomorrow's equally wet ride. I don't use inner gloves with these btw. That just defeats the purpose of the material.
  • gethinceri
    gethinceri Posts: 1,575
    Endura Deluge, hands gets a little clammy with sweat but combined with a good waterproof (Gore-Tex for me) I have no regrets about weighing out for them.
  • earth
    earth Posts: 934
    The only worthwhile cycling glove to get in wet situations is one made from neoprene. The gloves will get wet, and so will your hands but combined they keep your digits warm throughout the ride. A 'waterproof' glove on the other hand is IMO totally pointless.

    I went out today in the pi$$ing rain and freezing cold wind with my Assos S7 Rain Gloves on. Came home with warm (but damp) hands, turned the gloves inside out to dry and they'll be ready to go for tomorrow's equally wet ride. I don't use inner gloves with these btw. That just defeats the purpose of the material.

    Agree, they are a bit pointless. Your hands are always wet through sweat. But if they are warm then no problem. Neoprene is a reasonable idea - same principle as a wetsuit but I read they take a long time to dry. Are the S7 gloves neoprene?
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    I tried quite a few in search of a waterproof/breathable glove that had good bar feel (for club rides etc.) but kind of gave up.
    Ended up with some Assos gloves and liners which I love, but they are not waterproof.

    I then got some Endura Strike waterproof gloves for commuting which are great. I ended up wearing them on a club ride and they seem breathable. They are a little bulky but mine fit well (another problem with gloves) and gear/brake control is not too bad.

    Has kind of got me thinking that a breathable,waterproof and rideable glove is possible, but I am happy with what I have for now.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    I have some real good neoprene one's from when I did my degree, great and have great responsiveness. I seem to have misplaced them. so This morning I went out and wore marigolds with some endrua mits over the top. works well enough.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    sjmclean wrote:
    I have some real good neoprene one's from when I did my degree, great and have great responsiveness. I seem to have misplaced them. so This morning I went out and wore marigolds with some endrua mits over the top. works well enough.

    :shock:
  • earth
    earth Posts: 934
    The gloves I am currently using are Endura's that are supposed to be waterproof. They are a good glove but not waterproof. I will try neoprene next.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    earth wrote:
    The gloves I am currently using are Endura's that are supposed to be waterproof. They are a good glove but not waterproof. I will try neoprene next.

    What ones are they?
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,878
    castelli neoprene ones are good, but i found even the largest size is a bit too small for me, gave them to the gf, she uses them as winter gloves
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • Castelli dilivio neoprene gloves. Worn mime today in that pouring rain for 3 hours and my hands were lovely and warm. They also don't have much bulk so operating levers etc is easy. Well worth the £20 or so quid you can pick them up for.
  • earth
    earth Posts: 934
    Carbonator wrote:
    earth wrote:
    The gloves I am currently using are Endura's that are supposed to be waterproof. They are a good glove but not waterproof. I will try neoprene next.

    What ones are they?

    The Strike ones. Quite good until they get wet, then they are freezing cold.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    earth wrote:
    Carbonator wrote:
    earth wrote:
    The gloves I am currently using are Endura's that are supposed to be waterproof. They are a good glove but not waterproof. I will try neoprene next.

    What ones are they?

    The Strike ones. Quite good until they get wet, then they are freezing cold.

    Well you must either have a duff pair or the water is going in the cuff.

    I have just had my hands (wearing a pair of the Strikes) under running cold water for 6 minutes and my hands are bone dry and warm.
    I directed the water at every seam and clenched fists to simulate gear changing and they are perfect.

    I only recommend something if it's good so it's not just because I have a pair.
    I feel they are bang for buck the best gloves I have ever bought.
    Part of that is because they fit me well though.
    Have had about 3 months and washed once. Wear for daily commute and on the odd club ride.
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    My Sealkinz gloves are waterproof. I know this cos I've kept them on when I've sponged the bike down after a ride. Hard to tell when you're riding as you sweat in them and end up damp that way.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    yes, could be sweat making gloves damp/wet.

    I have worn gloves that do not breath and you end up with wet hands, but the Strikes are nothing like those (IME) which is why I rate them.

    Not perfect but good for the money and worth wearing in heavy rain on a long ride.
    My hands will be a lot dryer/warmer than other options I have tried.

    Perfect for commuting though IMO.
  • Endura Windchill gloves are good in showers, even good for heavy showers, good for temperatures between 3-15 deg C.
    When its colder than 3 deg or torrential rain I switch to seal skins winter gloves which are totally waterproof but very warm.
  • When its colder than 3 deg or torrential rain I switch to seal skins winter gloves which are totally waterproof but very warm.[/quote]
    I hope they are better than these http://www.outdoorgb.com/p/sealskinz_al ... wwodP2YA4w cycled to work in the rain and a little sleet , finger were freezing.
    Where is the elusive glove ??
  • No such thing as a waterproof glove.

    You either have warm hands or not.

    I've got sealskin gloves and they not waterproof as you sweat and thus get very damp cold hands.

    I suffer from the cold badly, and atm consisting some lobster style gloves purely to keep hands warm, question is which ones ofc....

    Then again could get some castelli neoprene ones although I doubt claims they keep hands warm though esp when it gets cold.
    London2Brighton Challange 100k!
    http://www.justgiving.com/broxbourne-runners
  • Philly8mt
    Philly8mt Posts: 552
    No such thing as a waterproof glove.

    You either have warm hands or not.

    I've got sealskin gloves and they not waterproof as you sweat and thus get very damp cold hands.

    I suffer from the cold badly, and atm consisting some lobster style gloves purely to keep hands warm, question is which ones ofc....

    Then again could get some castelli neoprene ones although I doubt claims they keep hands warm though esp when it gets cold.


    My boy has Castelli Diluvio gloves and really rates them tbf ...
    Saw some Lobster style gloves on the Assos factory outlet site, bout £28.00 if I remember rightly, worth a look?
    Still thinking of something clever to say!
  • Camcycle1974
    Camcycle1974 Posts: 1,356
    No one has mentioned a wool based glove. They will get wet but also retain warmth in the same way a Merino base layer does. I have both woolen and neoprene gloves. Wool gets wet but keeps you warm. The neoprene ones are ok but they split at the seams.
  • Semantik
    Semantik Posts: 537
    Well, I have got a pair of Sealskinz winter gloves which claim to be waterproof but they are not.These ones:
    http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/sp/road-t ... ealzglo230

    I wore them today in 1 hour of heavy rain and the water got through after 20 minutes and hands were soaking wet and freezing by end of ride. I have worn them previously in persistent drizzle/light rain and they just about coped but they were a total fail today.

    I have reached the conclusion that if I want to keep my hands dry in heavy rain I am going to have to wear some (black) Marigolds over the top of whatever gloves I am wearing. So I'm off to Tesco tonight for the largest pair of heavy duty ones I can find.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    Are you sure its not going in the cuff or that its actually sweat and not water?
    Dry them out and wear them under a running tap for 5 min to see if they are waterproof.
  • Semantik
    Semantik Posts: 537
    No, I was wearing a decent jacket with cuffs that covered the wrist part of the glove completely. And my extremities run cold so sweating is not a problem inside these gloves for me even if the air temperature is warmer than it was today. The gloves were soaking wet inside. I will follow your tip but am fairly sure what the result will be.
    Maybe Sealskinz do another glove that is 'more' waterproof than this one?
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    Er - those are water resistant - not waterproof ?

    I have a version of these - http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/sp/road-t ... ealzglo220 and they are waterproof. As tested by dunking in a bucket.
  • I am intrigued by the marigolds idea. Given they are dirt cheap has to be worth a try. I will wear them under proper gloves however...
  • earth
    earth Posts: 934
    I just poured a bit of water on the Endura's and watched it soak into the outer within a few seconds. They were better when new so maybe I should wash them but I am not hopeful.

    When it comes to Marigolds I'm going for the pink ones. I'll write Rapha on them and if anyone pokes fun I'll just say I got them at the Giro.
  • good idea, might do the same, will be the first time I've ever worn such a stylish brand....!
  • Moonbiker
    Moonbiker Posts: 1,706
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    Freeezer gloves are insulated plus water proof. :o

    Used them for dry stone walling jobs, but not tried on bike.

    Or theese:

    $(KGrHqZ,!qIFHGMM)ybqBR3BFSzMj!~~60_57.JPG
  • DrLex
    DrLex Posts: 2,142
    I bought a pair of Pearl Izumi WXB P.R.O.Barrier gloves last year at a bargain £10 from Amazon. I checked their waterproofing quality by using them when washing apples during a weekend's cider making (about 750 litres, if you're interested) and my hands stayed lovely and dry. Only dampness was when I let water get over the cuff near the end of the day. Not particularly warm, but can fit a liner inside.

    (Annoyingly, skidded on some diesel in December and now have a small tear in the palm :cry: )
    Location: ciderspace
  • earth
    earth Posts: 934
    Looks like Pearl Izumi have taken the initiative and put the waterproof layer where it should be.

    750 litres of cider is interesting :)
  • BMKN
    BMKN Posts: 222
    You could always try a solution called neverwet